Huawei P20 Pro and other models get delisted from benchmark app for inflating results (UPDATE)

Huawei P20 Pro and other models get delisted from benchmark app for inflating results (UPDATE)
Back in 2013, benchmarking firm 3DMark delisted the results from several devices. The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 (both Snapdragon and Exynos versions), Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014) tablet, HTC One (M7) and HTC One mini were removed from the 3DMark site for cheating. How did these devices game the system? Samsung and HTC allegedly included software on the aforementioned devices that had their processors run at maximum speeds when benchmark apps were run.

UPDATE: Huawei has issued a rather lengthy statement today.


Today, 3DMark has delisted several Huawei handsets (including one Honor model) after it reached the same conclusions as a published report. The latter called out Huawei for inflating the benchmark results on models like the Huawei P20 Pro, Huawei Nova 3 and the Honor Play. This has the effect of making these models appear to run faster than competing phones. Benchmark apps are designed to quantify the performance of certain aspects of a handset for comparison purposes. The 3DMark app in the Google Play Store measures an Android phone's CPU and GPU performance using different tests that are each designed specifically for low-end to high-end handsets.

Like it did with Samsung and HTC five years ago, 3DMark accused Huawei of including software on the P20 Pro, Nova 3 and Honor Play that recognized when a benchmark testing app was running, and pushed the processors on the phones to run all out. Usually, only phone enthusiasts even bother looking at benchmark scores. An even smaller number will consider the results when purchasing a new phone. Still, some manufacturers (usually not mainstream firms) do mention these scores when promoting a new handset.

Related phones

P20 Pro
  • Display 6.1" 1080 x 2240 pixels
  • Camera 40 MP / 24 MP front
  • Processor HiSilicon Kirin, Octa-core, 2360 MHz
  • Storage 128 GB
  • Battery 4000 mAh(25h talk time)
Play
  • Display 6.3" 1080 x 2340 pixels
  • Camera 16 MP / 16 MP front
  • Processor HiSilicon Kirin, Octa-core, 2360 MHz
  • Storage 64 GB + microSDXC
  • Battery 3750 mAh(23h talk time)

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160 Comments

1. Humanoid

Posts: 1226; Member since: Dec 11, 2017

No surprise

5. piyath

Posts: 2445; Member since: Mar 23, 2012

First Samsung, Then Huawei. They might have got this from the best (best in fraud).

11. BlackhawkFlys

Posts: 914; Member since: May 07, 2014

They should just feed those benchmark companies just like Apple instead of cheating on them.

17. Dr.Phil

Posts: 2366; Member since: Feb 14, 2011

Care to share evidence of that claim?

14. SmartPhoneMobiles

Posts: 187; Member since: Oct 16, 2016

U such idiot if u believe dis s**t...

2. bucky

Posts: 3785; Member since: Sep 30, 2009

Expected.

3. josephnero

Posts: 780; Member since: Nov 16, 2011

Is anyone really surprised?

4. Venom

Posts: 3573; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

Wow, as if I needed another reason to not trust Huawei.

9. BlackhawkFlys

Posts: 914; Member since: May 07, 2014

Huawei should just give a few dollars to these benchmarks companies just like Apple to keep their mouths shut.

13. chenski

Posts: 768; Member since: Mar 22, 2015

I trust them

86. cocoy

Posts: 457; Member since: Oct 30, 2015

Well, I don't buy phones because of their benchmark performance. I chose phones because I need them and the features that I want not because it's benchmark scores are low or higher.

6. TheOracle1

Posts: 2264; Member since: May 04, 2015

I barely even bother with benchmarks these days. The performance difference between high end phones is negligible because they're all very good now. Mid-range phones are superb too.

7. Foxgabanna

Posts: 597; Member since: Sep 11, 2016

Good thing Apple knows how to make quality hardware. Sept 12th!

61. Metalspy8

Posts: 148; Member since: Feb 27, 2012

Samsung chip

8. AbhiD

Posts: 803; Member since: Apr 06, 2012

That is some crazy cheating on benchmarks. ~100% artificial boost in benchmarks. So Kirin 970 is extremely underwhelming in reality as opposed to fake results of Huawei/Honor. A processor sold by Huawei in guise of flagship one while truly being the competitor of Snapdragon 6xx series ones. Whatta shame! No wonder their phones perform so poor in reality. No other manufacturer has been found cheating on such a massive scale in this day and age. It's like a car company duped customers by selling a 150HP car in guise of 300HP.

10. BlackhawkFlys

Posts: 914; Member since: May 07, 2014

My 2.5 years old honor 8 still runs smooth as butter with Kirin 950.

15. SmartPhoneMobiles

Posts: 187; Member since: Oct 16, 2016

Another pathetic naive person who believes everything crap says online.. Feel so sorry for you...

29. AfterShock

Posts: 4146; Member since: Nov 02, 2012

Check Anand tech website, disprove Andrei I'll be waiting.

48. Humanoid

Posts: 1226; Member since: Dec 11, 2017

One Plus was caught last year.

19. JCASS889

Posts: 539; Member since: May 18, 2018

The fact that you guys care about how fast someone else's phone is is truly sad, reavaluate your life, seriously do it. Nobody in thei real world gives a crap what phone you use

20. MarvzIsFallen

Posts: 646; Member since: Aug 11, 2017

This is what happens when they copied Samsung. Samsung cheats in their performance too to compete against apple. Just like their chips put in the iphones before. That’s why they lost it agaist tsmc.

28. Sammy_DEVIL737

Posts: 1529; Member since: Nov 28, 2016

And they still bought the display from Samsung. Rofl.....

53. Vokilam

Posts: 1201; Member since: Mar 15, 2018

No, they hired Samsung to build a display that Apple wanted.

99. Sammy_DEVIL737

Posts: 1529; Member since: Nov 28, 2016

In other words they saw potential of AmoLed screen & asked Samsung to make for iPX and bought it.

105. Vokilam

Posts: 1201; Member since: Mar 15, 2018

Yes, but not how you probably think. OLED allowed Apple to bend the screen back to allow it to reach all the edges. But Apple didn’t like the color calibration of Samsung designed panels - so they gave their own specs and design to Samsung to build. I believe the reason Apple chose Samsung is because of ability to fill the quota vs other manufacturers. Samsung can fill demand required by Apple. Because Apple designed and Cali I rated these screens different from Samsung stock process - Apple can name them their own way - resolution for a OLED had to be pumped up because of pentile arrangement - that’s why you see higher resolution on iPhone X than other iPhones. Pentile pixel arrangement isn’t as sharp as older LCD arrangement if kept at same resolutions. I had both OLED and non-OLED screens on my phones. And since 2012 all of them are the same to me.

134. Sammy_DEVIL737

Posts: 1529; Member since: Nov 28, 2016

Well I’m not talking about calibration. I know how Samsung saturates the colours of their display. I experienced it side by side on S7 and my Moto X 2(AMOLed display) and for surprise Moto X 2 had balanced colours in comparison to more punchy and aggressive colours on S7. I just pointed out the guy that even after all they still bought display from Samsung because of certain criteria.

140. Vokilam

Posts: 1201; Member since: Mar 15, 2018

That’s fair.

21. meanestgenius

Posts: 22072; Member since: May 28, 2014

My Huawei Mate 10 Pro runs fantastic. Smooth, consistent and stutter free. I trust in my real life usage, and that usage tells me that my Kirin 970 powered Mate 10 Pro is a beast, so I trust Huawei. It's always better to judge with your own usage cases and experience than to talk about what you've never used as if you can formulate a proper opinion with zero experience.

39. Venom

Posts: 3573; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

Haven't you criticized the Pixel and the Essential phone, never used either device? You just contradicted yourself.

40. meanestgenius

Posts: 22072; Member since: May 28, 2014

Haven't you done the same to BlackBerry, Nokia and Huawei smartphones, having never used, owned or purchased a martphone from any of those OEM's? Pot, meet kettle.

* Some comments have been hidden, because they don't meet the discussions rules.

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