The number of Nokia phones on US carriers grows to four with the 3.1 A and 3.1 C

The number of Nokia phones on US carriers grows to four with the 3.1 A and 3.1 C
While the entry-level Nokia 2.2 is not officially scheduled for a commercial US release (at least not yet), the revived and rapidly growing brand already has a couple of other Android handsets headed to American carriers. Technically, the Nokia 3.1 A and Nokia 3.1 C are one and the same phone, the lone difference being the former will exclusively come to AT&T soon, with the latter model set for Cricket Wireless support only.

As the names suggest, these are slightly higher-end devices than Verizon's Nokia 2V, settling for a smaller screen and humbler specs however than Cricket's Nokia 3.1 Plus (hence the absence of the Plus moniker). That also means the number of Nokia-branded smartphones available on US carriers will soon be doubled, including two Cricket-exclusive products and a single model on sale at both AT&T and Verizon. 

Unsurprisingly, the design and features of the Nokia 3.1 A and 3.1 C are nothing to write home about. You get super-thick screen bezels rather than the discreet waterdrop notch of the international Nokia 2.2, as well as a cheap plastic construction, a relatively modest Snapdragon 429 processor under the hood paired with 2GB RAM, and 2,990 mAh battery capacity that the manufacturer says should be enough for two days of autonomy.

While two whole days sounds like a bit of a stretch, we don't doubt these low to mid-end handsets are capable of above-average running times, given their frugal chipsets and 5.45-inch displays with HD resolution, which shouldn't drain your power very quickly. Other specifications include 32 gigs of internal storage space, single 8MP rear-facing shooters, single 5MP selfie cameras, USB Type-C ports, 3.5 mm headphone jacks, and predictably enough, no fingerprint recognition technology.

Silky smooth software is likely to be a key selling point, even though the Nokia 3.1 A and 3.1 C are not technically part of the Android One program. Be that as it may, they still run Android 9.0 Pie out the box, promising better than average support for their price bracket. By the way, while the exact price tags haven't been revealed yet, we can probably expect the two devices to circle the $100 mark, launching June 10 on AT&T and four days later on Cricket Wireless.

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17 Comments

1. 7thlvl

Posts: 60; Member since: Dec 09, 2018

I've missed Nokia. I'm glad they are coming back to the market.

2. VariableCheapskate

Posts: 196; Member since: May 29, 2019

Glad they are too, I'm not really bothered by all the basic/cheap options, as they seem more reasonably designed than most flagships. At this price it isn't about the SOC or RAM, it's about not having a ton of pre installed garbage on the home screen you can't get rid off on a prepaid-locked smartphone.

5. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

Totally agree. It’s great to have Nokia branded smartphones on the market.

3. poopypants78

Posts: 30; Member since: Jul 13, 2017

They really need more VZW-compatible phones. This GSM-only s**t sucks.

4. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

GSM is the most widely used network in the world for smartphones (much to the chagrin of some people that just don’t seem to understand or want to accept that), so it only makes sense that most OEM’s cater to it. However, the Nokia 2V is currently available on Verizon. Perhaps their will be a version for the Verizon with the Nokia 2.2.

7. Venom

Posts: 3821; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

I agree. They need to offer more band support for carriers like Verizon. Of course you are going to have some detractors who are going to aggressively say that GSM is the standard even though LTE is technically based on GSM and is the standard now. It doesn't make sense when Motorola has devices similar to Nokia and are compatible with all carriers.

11. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

How is it aggressive to say a fact? GSM is still the world standard, as there are parts of the world that don’t have LTE, so it makes total sense. It’s not like HMD doesn’t have a smartphone on Verizon network. First, you complained about HMD not having enough smartphones in the U.S., now you’re complaining about support for Verizon’s network when they do have a phone on Verizon’s network. You’re just complaining for the sake of complaining now.

15. Venom

Posts: 3821; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

LTE is GSM technology. You're just trying to find fault with what I said just because you don't know what you are talking about. I'm not complaining at all. That's just you not wanting to see anything but your own opinion. You are incredibly short sighted.

16. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

LTE isn’t available everywhere in the world. I find fault with misinformation. Stop getting so defensive because it’s me that’s posting the correct information simply because you don’t know what you’re talking about. You’re always complaining for the sake of complaining. You think your complaints are gospel, but they aren’t. You prove how short sighted you are daily by refusing to acknowledge any other opinion but your own.

12. Paximos

Posts: 283; Member since: Jul 26, 2012

Ditch Verizon

6. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

Great to see HMD’s plan to slowly enter the U.S. market via carriers is paying off, despite what some have previously said. With the presence of Nokia branded smartphones growing on carriers, albeit with the low end first, it may not be long before we see some of HMD’s mid-range to upper mid-range smartphones start to make their presence felt on U.S. carriers, and then go higher from there. Great strategy.

8. Venom

Posts: 3821; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

How many of these foodstamp phones are they going to continue releasing? It's like they are releasing the same variation of a phone under slightly different names. Where's the higher end models like the 7 Plus?

9. VariableCheapskate

Posts: 196; Member since: May 29, 2019

You're not the focus market, so why does it matter?

13. Venom

Posts: 3821; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

I never said I was. It's an open forum for all to comment.

10. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

They are going to release as many low end smartphones as they need there is demand for. Android OEM’s get the bulk of their sales from such. That’s the basics. Let’s not talk about same variations when that’s all the Pixel line has been, lol.

14. Venom

Posts: 3821; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

The Pixel line has all been the same variations? Lol, go home meanest. You are drunk. That can kill more brain cells.

17. meanestgenius

Posts: 22487; Member since: May 28, 2014

The Pixel XL is just a bigger Pixel, lol. You’re just as drunk as you claim I am if you don’t understand that carriers demand different variants. Your brain cells are clearly in beta, just like the entire Pixel line lmao.

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