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By the end of 2013, any mobile video chat app will work over cellular on AT&T

Posted: , by Maxwell R.

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By the end of 2013, any mobile video chat app will work over cellular on AT&T
You got to admit, AT&T has managed to allow this issue to remain a festering sore spot with its customers for some time, flying in the face of common sense and what its competitors allow.  Moreover, AT&T has never been upfront with its reasons for its restrictive policies about video calling over cellular.

Of course, we know the real underlying reasons, but AT&T’s boilerplate PR announcements about the issue have not helped the carrier’s image much. It has also fueled lawsuits and formal complaints to the FCC over the matter.

Whatever the issues of money and spectrum were (and believe us, those were the only drivers although spectrum/capacity was likely the more pressing culprit), it appears that AT&T has finally figured out the math and engineering to ensure that customers can utilize video calls over cellular using native apps by the end of 2013.  Soon, it will not matter what rate plan you are on or what device you are using.

By mid-June, AT&T will enable all native video chat applications to work on Samsung, Apple and BlackBerry devices as long as they are LTE capable hardware. Through the second half of 2013, all pre-loaded video chat apps will work over cellular no matter what device or plan the customer is on. Third party apps like Skype should already work for everyone.

According to AT&T, pre-loaded video apps use more bandwidth than third-party solutions (i.e. spectrum/capacity concerns).  This means that Google’s new Hangouts should work as well by the end of the year, which while good news, cannot have too many AT&T customers very thrilled given how long they will have to wait while their friends on competing carriers are not beset by such policies.

source: The Verge

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posted on 21 May 2013, 00:33 4

1. g2a5b0e (Posts: 1938; Member since: 08 Jun 2012)


I never understood why AT&T did this in the first place. As greedy as they are, you'd think they would have wanted you using video calls over cellular data from the beginning. That way you'd have to splurge for a higher data allowance, resulting in you giving them more money. I guess they're as stupid as they are greedy.

posted on 21 May 2013, 00:52 1

2. BadAssAbe (Posts: 434; Member since: 22 Apr 2011)


I really hate ATT and most big wireless providers.
Charge extra for
Tethering
WiFi hotspot
Must pay for data plans on a smartphone

Preferences for new customers over old loyal customers
Bloatware and more bloatware

Unfair data plans
20$ for 200mb
Or
30$ for 1GB
Must pick one

This list can go on forever

posted on 21 May 2013, 15:24

8. HDShatter (Posts: 1014; Member since: 17 Jan 2013)


Data plans are huge scams so the carriers can make billions off people.

posted on 21 May 2013, 01:42 1

3. Leo_MC (Posts: 394; Member since: 02 Dec 2011)


This is a violation of civil rights; one has the right to access whatever part of internet, whatever service, as long as one doesn't break the law.
I'm not buying the data ATT wants me to use, I buy the data I want to use.

This practice is illegal in Europe.

posted on 21 May 2013, 06:59

5. Nico85 (Posts: 10; Member since: 15 Dec 2011)


I love Internet lawyers.

posted on 22 May 2013, 09:03

9. Leo_MC (Posts: 394; Member since: 02 Dec 2011)


Don't be a smartass.

Readhttp://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32000L0031:EN:NOT

posted on 21 May 2013, 15:01 1

7. Zero0 (Posts: 561; Member since: 05 Jul 2012)


This practice is probably also illegal in the US of A.

posted on 21 May 2013, 04:13

4. darkkjedii (Posts: 9316; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


A step in the rite direction.

posted on 21 May 2013, 15:01

6. Zero0 (Posts: 561; Member since: 05 Jul 2012)


Awesome that AT&T is finally going to follow the law.

Seriously. No one questioned this on net neutrality grounds over the last, what, 3 years?

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