Apple rumored to make switch to glass-film touch panels for Apple Watch Series 3

Apple rumored to make switch to glass-film touch panels for Apple Watch Series 3
When the Apple Watch Series 2 launched, it marked a change in the display used on the timepiece. Instead of using the two pieces of glass (G/G) touch panels employed on the original device, Apple switched to TOL (touch on lens) for the Series 2 version of its watch. This proved to be a hardship for supplier TPK Holdings.The company produced the panels and found that its yield rates were low and stayed low for TOL. The main issue was the curve in the screen.

TPK has been reporting losses thanks to the low TOL yields, and the company has apparently decided to stop supplying glass panels for the Apple Watch in the hope that it can return to profitability. Meanwhile, Apple has reportedly decided to move to a different form of panel for the Apple Watch Series 3. For the next version of the Apple Watch, the gang in Cupertino is said to be turning to G/F (glass-film). Possible suppliers will be General Interface Solutions out of Taiwan, or Hong Kong's Biel Crystal Manufactory.

Shipments of the G/F panels will start in the second half of the year, which dovetails with reports that the Series 3 Apple Watch will launch sometime in the Fall of 2017.

source: Digitimes

FEATURED VIDEO

9 Comments

1. Zylam

Posts: 1813; Member since: Oct 20, 2010

Daam, remember the Sapphire glass vendor that had to file for bankruptcy because they couldn't handle the volume Apple required. They also suffered from low yield rates. It seems that whatever component Apple requires is almost a double edged sword for vendors. The shear volume they need to produce is enough for them to put their company on the line.

3. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Because they were trying ot use a process call "seeding". It is use in the jewelry industry as a way to increase yields of rare stone. The problem with "seeding" is, they use a small about of the actual mineral and then use a articifical system to try to grown it bigger. The result is a sub-standard product that doesn't offer all the same benefits as the real thing. The yields are so very low because the machines are very expensive, and the process is very delicate and tedious. Basically it just doesn't work all that well. The only stones that have a high yield are artificial diamonds. Because with these, they aren't trying to achieve high quality. With Sapphire the quality needs ot be very high for the planned usage. In this case a glass for a phone. They filed bankruptcy because Apple tried to be cheap, and when the costs started going up because it ended up being more expensive than expected, Apple pulled out. Without funding you go out of business.

2. darkkjedii

Posts: 30972; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Series 3 needs to be a redesign.

5. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Round?!

6. darkkjedii

Posts: 30972; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

To me, round doesn't matter, but if it looks good....then cool. If the go round, the Digital Crown would be centered, so...why not. I actually prefer square watches, but round is cool too.

7. jack123

Posts: 278; Member since: Jan 07, 2013

Square is cool, round is more classy, but I hope they can make them thinner and have a good battery life.

8. darkkjedii

Posts: 30972; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

How do you define round as classy, but not square?

4. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

So basically using more "cheap" parts and yet still sell for a ton of case, with limited capabilities and (useful) features. Please add cellular and the ability to install apps from the app store. Without that, its a total waste of money.

9. batmite

Posts: 197; Member since: Jan 19, 2017

Apple Watch is the best smart watch ever created.

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.