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Pair of Apple patents improves handwriting and touch recognition on mobile devices

Posted: , by Alan F.

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Pair of Apple patents improves handwriting and touch recognition on mobile devices
Apple has filed for a couple of patents with the USPTO for Heuristic based improvements that do a better job of representing digital handwriting on a mobile device and improve touch input to hone in on what the user wants, ignoring extraneous touches. The digital handwriting patent was originally filed in 2011 and uses a set of rules to capture digital handwriting on a touchscreen. The rules determine if two points on a touchscreen are to be connected by a line segment or curve. If it is a curve, another set of rules determines the characteristics of the curve. The result is a better reproduction of digital handwriting on as touchscreen.

Some third party apps allow for handwriting capture on the Apple iPhone

Some third party apps allow for handwriting capture on the Apple iPhone

If you've ever used the digital signature capture to claim a package by FedEx, for example, you can see that your signature is not reproduced smoothly. That's because the unit employed by delivery firms does not have the processing power to do so. Using the set of rules, Apple uses what processing power it does have on a mobile device to fill in the space between two points and can even make a curve in a smooth manner depending on the distance between the two points. Velocity and direction are used and measured together to determine if it will be a straight line or a curve between two points. The process will work for a fingertip signature or one using a stylus.

The second patent application deals with ignoring touch inputs outside of an "active region". In other words, users resting their palm on a touchscreen when using handwriting as an input method can accidentally set off unwanted "touch events". By defining an "active region" any touch outside of that region can be ignored. Lines, like a virtual notebook, can be used to indicate where the active region is. One the writing process is stopped, the writing can be saved for further use.

Both patents could easily find their way inside a future version of iOS

Both patents were originally filed in April 2011.

source: USPTO (1), (2) via AppleInsider

The two patents deal with digital handwriting capture (L) and extraneous touch inputs
The two patents deal with digital handwriting capture (L) and extraneous touch inputs

The two patents deal with digital handwriting capture (L) and extraneous touch inputs


15 Comments
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posted on 11 Oct 2012, 08:29 10

1. wendygarett (unregistered)


Not another patent :(

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 08:30 4

2. No_Nonsense (Posts: 826; Member since: 17 Aug 2012)


Where the hell is a working proto?

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 08:40 2

4. protozeloz (Posts: 5328; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


nowhere....

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 08:36 6

3. protozeloz (Posts: 5328; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


Galaxy Note.....

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 08:50 3

5. doejon (Posts: 311; Member since: 31 Jul 2012)


oh yeah on a 3,5 - 4,0 inch screen with the fingers lol have fun..

galaxy note rulez

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 09:03 5

6. AlexYouOC (Posts: 49; Member since: 19 Jun 2012)


Im getting so damn tired of Apple filing for patents on things that already exist smmfh....

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 09:04 5

7. fervid (Posts: 172; Member since: 22 Nov 2011)


Since when does the iPhone have a stylus? The only reason they are even doing this is because they see the success of the Note and want along for the ride without any actual innovation and investment in it. PTO needs to stop awarding things that are made up in people's minds or only on paper.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 09:28 3

8. Fallout09 (Posts: 409; Member since: 17 Oct 2011)


Why would Apple do that? Last year, Apple was saying that talking to Siri is the way of the future and all forms of physical input is antiquated and obsolete,

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 10:30 2

9. omacmagics (Posts: 42; Member since: 27 Dec 2011)


I've already seen the Note doing this but probably in a different way, I wonder if Sammy filed for a patent? Apple will suck a leech dry.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 12:09 2

10. ddeath (Posts: 152; Member since: 14 Apr 2012)


Apple... Here we go again... 'stealing' ideas. They probably had that sentence "Good artists copy, great artists steal." framed up in their offices.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 16:09 1

11. rusticguy (Posts: 2811; Member since: 11 Aug 2012)


Good so apple is trying to target Samsung's S Pen now. Best is Apple+Oracle+M$ should forma global alliance of Patent Trolls.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 16:11

12. GeekMovement (Posts: 1497; Member since: 09 Sep 2011)


This patent is awarded to the Galaxy Note & II. Apple can just shut it. They haven't even invented anything to do with a stylus or writing on screen.

Losers.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 17:24

13. loli5 (Posts: 76; Member since: 08 Oct 2012)


"Apple has filed for a couple of patents with the USPTO..."

Of course they did. Fresh and new.

posted on 11 Oct 2012, 19:15

14. gallitoking (Posts: 4630; Member since: 17 May 2011)


you guys have any ideas that just because it was patent doesn't mean it will get used.. Samsung has patents for flexible screens back in 2010 that have yet seen the light of day.. but I guess the hate for Apple is more important now than thinking..

posted on 13 Oct 2012, 22:17

15. Googlethis (Posts: 168; Member since: 05 Jul 2012)


whats the point of patenting it if you are not going to use it. I am sure samsung will use there flex screen technology (granted apple does not patent the use of (if i remember correctly they did)) If it isn't the companies developed technology then the why should another company have any right to patenting the use of it in any way. that goes for any company not just apple. quite frankly i believe you shouldn't be able to patent technology or at least not in the way our current patent system is working.

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