ABC News releases video clips of interview with Tim Cook discussing court order

ABC News releases video clips of interview with Tim Cook discussing court order
ABC News has posted a couple of video clips relating to an interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook that it will broadcast as an exclusive tonight. Cook will be talking to David Muir about the company's decision not to unlock the Apple iPhone 5c belonging to terrorist Syed Farook. The only way that Apple can unlock the phone, is to build a new version of iOS.

But Apple's CEO is quick to tell the country via ABC News that this is not a viable solution. "This is not something that we would create. This would be bad for America," Tim Cook said. "It would also set a precedent that I believe many people in America would be offended by." He added that it would have been better for Apple and the government to have had more "dialogue" between them before the issue became public.

Meanwhile, the New York Times is reporting that Apple is working on a new version of the iPhone that cannot be unlocked, even with a new, unique version of iOS. This new iPhone would force the government to come up with new ways to try to force Apple to get inside the device if law enforcement officials deemed it necessary to do so.

Despite Apple's refusal to unlock the phone used by the dead terrorist, the government is at fault for changing the Apple ID passcode belonging to the device. Had that not happened, Apple could have backed up the phone to iCloud using a Wi-Fi network, and would have been able to turn over all of the information requested by the court order.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

source: NYTimes, AppleInsider

FEATURED VIDEO

23 Comments

1. almostdone

Posts: 428; Member since: Sep 25, 2012

Respect to Tim Cook!

15. another1

Posts: 157; Member since: Dec 25, 2015

Can't wait to hear TechieXP's opinion!

17. yoosufmuneer

Posts: 1518; Member since: Feb 14, 2015

That'd be an article lol

2. mike2959

Posts: 693; Member since: Oct 08, 2011

First off, give the clowns at Mcafee any iPhone for gods sakes, to see If the retard can actually do it. 2nd, Apple don't you dare do it. Please. Is nothing private anymore? Sacred? Here we go managing down to the lowest level. Lowest pieces of trash.

5. abhinav.tella

Posts: 14; Member since: Jul 18, 2015

McAfee itself is owned by Intel, the founder was on the run earlier...

10. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

on the run? maybe he just abducted by FBI and forced to crack that phone

7. Arch_Fiend

Posts: 3948; Member since: Oct 03, 2015

Not the clowns at McaFee because It wasn't McaFee Antivirus (currently owned by Intel) that volunteered to decrypt the phone it. John McaFee himself (the founder of McaFee antivirus) offered to do it, probably using the resources at a company called Everykey that he is apart of. Honestly he could probably do it.

8. boucha26

Posts: 50; Member since: Jul 01, 2015

lol.... you give your all stuff to me and il keep it saftly... do u believe me???? you should keep your stuff yourself.... you never give it to someone right.... then how can apple believe Mcafee????

3. mike2959

Posts: 693; Member since: Oct 08, 2011

First off, give the clowns at Mcafee any iPhone for gods sakes, to see If the retard can actually do it. 2nd, Apple don't you dare do it. Please. Is nothing private anymore? Sacred? Here we go managing down to the lowest level. Lowest pieces of trash.

4. Mercedes-Benz

Posts: 403; Member since: Jan 18, 2015

Yeah i always liked apple products but not them as a company . Now i loved them as a company .

6. tbacba

Posts: 134; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

And now I hate them even more. What a lying sack of sh_t Cook is. They don't have to create a back door for the whole world. They wouldn't be creating "cancer" like he states. It's one phone and one phone only. Unlocking this one phone just might possibly prevent more terrorist murders. Cook could do this and he knows it, but the dollar rules at Apple.

12. MrElectrifyer

Posts: 3960; Member since: Oct 21, 2014

"They wouldn't be creating "cancer" like he states. It's one phone and one phone only" They clearly describe why that's a naive thought right here on their website, and I 100% agree with them: http://www.apple.com/customer-letter/answers/ It reads: "Could Apple build this operating system just once, for this iPhone, and never use it again? The digital world is very different from the physical world. In the physical world you can destroy something and it’s gone. But in the digital world, the technique, once created, could be used over and over again, on any number of devices. Law enforcement agents around the country have already said they have hundreds of iPhones they want Apple to unlock if the FBI wins this case. In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks. Of course, Apple would do our best to protect that key, but in a world where all of our data is under constant threat, it would be relentlessly attacked by hackers and cybercriminals. As recent attacks on the IRS systems and countless other data breaches have shown, no one is immune to cyberattacks. Again, we strongly believe the only way to guarantee that such a powerful tool isn’t abused and doesn’t fall into the wrong hands is to never create it."

20. j2001m

Posts: 3061; Member since: Apr 28, 2014

Sorry mate, but you wrong, when Apple make a software update and the same way why the fbi can not make there own software update like you can for android Is because Apple auths the software without that auth on there server the software will not update, so all they have to do is remove the auth and then there is no way even if this software gets out can it be used, the same way as older iOS can not be used on the iPhone 5c (Please install the software that cam with the iPhone 5 rom on any iPhone 5c and then get back to me

23. MrElectrifyer

Posts: 3960; Member since: Oct 21, 2014

"Is because Apple auths the software without that auth on there server the software will not update" And what makes you think the security bypass software code can't be later hacked from such firmware and implemented in new versions of iOS just like jailbroken iOS firmware used to be? It has been done before, and it can be done again. All it takes is a clever hacker like GeoHot with malicious intentions to achieve that. Again, it's naive to think creating it once and removing authentication for it would make it go away...welcome to the 21st century.

9. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

It can be used as marketing if they plan something like this... they make software to unlock iPhone 5c... but right after that, they offer iPhone 5se turn-in program to "save their consumers private data".. that turn-in program is for i5, i5s, and i5c, plus extra $300-$400 to get i5se (or free with 2 year carrier-contract) with that logic, i5se existense totally make sense o.O and they can sell some hundred million of i5se this way

13. sissy246

Posts: 7035; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

Agree that it can be done to this phone with out unlocking other. They designed this phone , they can crack this one phone. I also agree that part of why apple (Tim Cook ) won't because it will more then likely help sales.

19. greyarea

Posts: 267; Member since: Aug 14, 2015

This is how most people who don't understand technology think. With hunches and feelings. It just SEEMS like it shouldn't be this complicated. Apple is huge and rich and all smart and crap right? They made the damn thing they MUST be able to effect one single phone without risking effect to others. It's probably for sales, because I figured out they could use this as a excuse for sales somehow, therefore that's most likely what's going on. The real shame is when people keep believing their hunches and speculations even after the technical details are explained to them. Because clearly any information counter to your gut is probably propaganda for apple.

21. tbacba

Posts: 134; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

Simple question: if Tim Cook had a child or relative that was being held by terrorists, and the FBI needed to crack an iPhone to get info on their whereabouts, do you think his response would be the same? The answer to that question illustrates his true motives: $$$.

22. greyarea

Posts: 267; Member since: Aug 14, 2015

You fit the bill for my previous comment alright. Based on no evidence other than your hunches and feelings you've decided this ordeal is just being used as a money making opportunity? The whole, governments wanting keys past cryptography is...inconsequential? Whether or not the response is the same in your barely related hypothetical wouldn't make breaking the encryption any more appropriate.

24. tbacba

Posts: 134; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

My obviously missed point is, his response would likely be different. Yes that's a hypothetical, but I also assume Tim Cook is a human being, so I think it's a pretty good hypothetical. And if he had a different response, then that validates my point.

25. greyarea

Posts: 267; Member since: Aug 14, 2015

You're point wasn't obviously missed, it was obvious and acknowledged. You decided Cook would crack if it hit closer to home vs now where it's just an opportunity to make money. I don't think his potential different response validates that point though. He could still be being honest about his motives now, and crack when someone grabs his mom. That's just emotion tossing previous convictions out the window. It's not an AWFUL hypothetical, I don't know about 'pretty good'. You're talking about an active hostage situation who's whereabouts are located on the phone vs post mass shooting with the shooters dead.

26. tbacba

Posts: 134; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

My final comment: Thank you for validating my original argument. If the circumstances were different, Tim Cook would be doing everything in his power (successful or not) to get the info off that phone, instead of everything in his power to obstruct. That's not "tossing previous convictions", that's hypocrisy. Like I said originally, he's a lying sack of sh_t.

14. phoneye

Posts: 1; Member since: Feb 22, 2016

Can't they just import the new software into the phone through computer and the charging cable, unlock the phone, remove the software and give it back? I'm no software developer, coder, etc. but couldn't it be possible?

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.