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Micron delivers phase-change memory to market, super fast smartphone storage nearing

Posted: , by Nick T.

Micron delivers phase-change memory to market, super fast smartphone storage nearing
Ever wondered how your smartphone magically stores your stuff? Well, inside it is a little piece of silicon – a NAND memory chip, where all the data is being safely kept. A new technology, however, is likely to emerge as an alternative to silicon-based memory chips. It is called phase-change memory (PCM), and the first mass-produced samples are already available from Micron.

The chips that are currently in production are 1Gb (128 megabytes) in size, with an additional 512Mb (64 megabytes) of volatile memory included, which makes them suitable for use in feature phones. Future models, however, will be of greater capacity and might end up being used in smartphones and tablets. What makes the PCM chips better than conventional NAND flash memory is that they can theoretically reach read speeds of 400 megabytes per second. As the technology evolves, it might even replace the kinds of RAM modules that smartphone makers currently use. Last but not least, PCM memory is energy efficient, which should help prolong the battery life of devices it is used in.

For more info about PCM and the way it works, check out the demo video that we have embedded below. 

source: Micron via Engadget



Press Release

8 Comments
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posted on 19 Jul 2012, 08:06 3

1. kamil (Posts: 115; Member since: 07 Feb 2012)


I predict in the future that the PCM would be used on high to low and feature phones since is faster and more energy efficient than the current flash memory silicon chips.

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 09:19

2. QWIKSTRIKE (Posts: 864; Member since: 09 Mar 2010)


great technology advancement for mobile phones

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 09:42

3. casbah70 (Posts: 16; Member since: 21 Jun 2011)


I'm a bit confused about "1Gb (128 megabytes)" and "512Mb (64 megabytes)". 1GB does not equal 128MB and 512MB does not equal 64MB. Some information MUST be missing.

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 10:03 1

4. wumberpeb (Posts: 431; Member since: 14 Mar 2011)


Not sure if there's sarcasm in that statement, but that's not gigabyte or megabytes. Megabits and gigabits. 8 bits in a byte

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 12:05 2

5. Sparhawk (Posts: 75; Member since: 10 Mar 2012)


Capitalization is very important.
"Gb" (lower-case b) = gigabit.
"GB" (upper-case B) = gigabyte.
1 GB = 8 Gb.
1 GB = 1024 MB.
1 Gb = 1/8 GB = 1024 MB/8 = 128MB.

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 12:22

7. noim1 (Posts: 297; Member since: 15 May 2012)


I think it means the Transfer rate of 1GB is 128MB & 512mb is 64mb.

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 13:37

8. Sparhawk (Posts: 75; Member since: 10 Mar 2012)


@noim1: Did you read the article?
"The chips that are currently in production are 1Gb (128 megabytes) in size, with an additional 512Mb (64 megabytes) of volatile memory included,..."
These are clearly storage sizes, not transfer rates.

posted on 19 Jul 2012, 12:12

6. axllebeer (Posts: 265; Member since: 05 Apr 2011)


This is a great advancement in mobile technology. Some time will pass before we see it put to practical use, however with current battery tech reaching it's limits, this is a logical step.

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