Google's Android 7.0 Nougat was slow to gather market share in its first three months


Since Google unveiled Android 7.0 Nougat back in August, there haven't been a lot of smartphones to get the new OS version or launch with it pre-installed. Aside from the LG V20 and the Google Pixel and Pixel XL, there are no other major smartphones in the US to come with Nougat out of the box. Furthermore, most of the popular Android smartphones of 2016 still run some version of Android Marshmallow. Sure, Motorola is breaking the pattern by launching quick Nougat updates to its latest phones, but at the market level, Nougat has yet to make an impact some three months since its unveiling.

Looking at the latest Android distribution numbers, published earlier today on the Android Developers Dashboard, these impressions get manifested into numbers. According to Google's own stats, Android 7.0 Nougat is running on just 0.3% of devices. Android 7.1 Nougat, which is the improved version of the OS that currently runs only on the Google Pixel and Pixel XL, doesn't even show up in the graphs as Google doesn't show Android versions with a distribution of less than 0.1 percent.

Lollipop remains the most popular flavor of Android at the moment, with a commanding 34 percent share of the market. Then comes KitKat with 25.2 percent and Marshmallow close behind at 24 percent.

In the next couple of months, Nougat's adoption is expected to get a significant boost. Samsung announced that it's planning to launch the beta version of Android 7.0 Nougat to the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge, the OnePlus 3 is about to get its own slice of Nougat, Sony has kicked off its Nougat beta program, and even the ZTE Axon 7 will get the new Android version in January.

We should also take the time to highlight that Marshmallow isn't doing too bad. Launched last year, Marshmallow was slow to gather market share at first. Back in the summer, it was installed on just 7.5 percent of active Android devices. As we now approach the end of 2016, Marshmallow rose to a share of 24 percent.

As far as the traditional fragmentation-centered conversation that Google's Android distribution numbers usually stir up, it doesn't look like the situation has gotten any better for Android in this regard over the past few years.

source: Google

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11 Comments

1. Plasticsh1t

Posts: 3094; Member since: Sep 01, 2014

Blame the OEMs and their crappy bloatware.

2. bucky

Posts: 3774; Member since: Sep 30, 2009

Android has to fix this. Lillipop was released over 2 years ago...

4. Finalflash

Posts: 4063; Member since: Jul 23, 2013

It's been fixed, apps update indeed independent to the system and support library brings most modern features to all versions. The remaining 10% of features will have to be waited for unfortunately.

6. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

"It's been fixed," According to that chart.....it hasn't.

8. Finalflash

Posts: 4063; Member since: Jul 23, 2013

Well there are apps which will change the version number it shows and if you want an experience like other platforms, say iOS, you can get an app that simultaneously reduces performance for no reason as well, takes a bit more work I guess.

9. joey_sfb

Posts: 6794; Member since: Mar 29, 2012

Finalflash is right! Google Apps app models is different from iOS. Apple app policy require app developer to update their app to support their supported iOS versions, Google does not. 99% of Android apps still run on Jelly Bean, an 2012 OS.

10. joey_sfb

Posts: 6794; Member since: Mar 29, 2012

Unlike iOS Google does not force developer to release or upgrade their apps to support only the official supported iOS versions. 80% of the Android apps would support a 2011 ICS release. So there really no pressure for user to upgrade their phone other than desire have a newer device or a latest Android OS release.

11. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

"80% of the Android apps would support a 2011 ICS release. So there really no pressure for user to upgrade their phone other than desire have a newer device or a latest Android OS release." That sounds like a security nightmare waiting to happen....congrats. And since my iPhone will get updates AT THE SAME TIME as other models and for longer, why would I care about any of what you've mentioned? I already knew this info.....

3. Tanii

Posts: 132; Member since: Apr 30, 2015

Lollipop wasn't that much great, even now a days many smartphones are being released with marshmallow instead of nougat, take example of honor 6x. Marshmallow has been so stable and full of features that oems aren't even taking interest in nougat although that is much much better.

5. Well-Manicured-Man

Posts: 664; Member since: Jun 16, 2015

I would say that the release cycle of the oems just didn't fit with google's release cycle. No special reason behind slow Nougat start.

7. IosDroid

Posts: 117; Member since: Dec 03, 2015

Well, if you hold back the best features it's no wonder!

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