Google snags Apple engineer to help with company's rumored production of in-house mobile chips

Google snags Apple engineer to help with company's rumored production of in-house mobile chips
Google is said to be in the early stages of developing its own line of mobile chips that it can deploy on future Pixel handsets and other mobile devices. To help Google produce top quality components, the company has lured chip designer John Bruno away from Apple. According to a recently published report, Bruno was in charge of Apple's silicon competitive analysis group. This team made sure that the chips used inside Apple devices like the iPhone and iPad were topping those used by competitors.

Prior to joining Apple, Bruno worked at Advanced Micro Devices, where he was head engineer. He worked on development of the Fusion line of chips, and also handled chip design at ATI. Now listed as a "System Architect" for Google, Bruno is one of several engineers that have left Apple for Mountain View. Among the most important engineers that made the switch was Manu Gulati, who worked on Apple's A series chipsets used to power devices like the Apple iPhone, Apple iPad, Apple iPod touch and the soon to be released Apple HomePod smart speaker.

After going after big name engineers from firms like Apple and Qualcomm with a fervor, we could see Google introducing its own line of chips as early as next year.


source: TheInformation (paywall) via SlashGear

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41 Comments

1. Jrod99

Posts: 714; Member since: Jan 15, 2016

Sounds good but should work on your quality control. The Pixel line this is year had way too many problems.

5. Peacetoall unregistered

I guess future pixel phone will throttle too.

7. lyndon420

Posts: 6737; Member since: Jul 11, 2012

Solid state batteries. They're coming.

15. bucky

Posts: 3776; Member since: Sep 30, 2009

Lol you are trying too hard.

2. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Should be one helluva chip then. Apple kills it in the chip game.

4. guest

Posts: 371; Member since: Jun 13, 2012

That's because they essentially run it overclocked for the first year and after that it sucks ass

6. Peacetoall unregistered

This guest get's it

8. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Tell that to someone who cares dude. Apple does what it does, as a precaution, not to force upgrades. They should’ve been more transparent about it, but it is what it is. Apples A series chips are better, and that’s that.

12. Peacetoall unregistered

No doubt about that apple do design better processors

17. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

That’s all I was speaking on bro...nothing more. I do think they should’ve been open about the battery related throttling though, I can see why they do it, but to the user, it’s just an inexplicable slowdown with no explanation.

36. cmdacos

Posts: 4105; Member since: Nov 01, 2016

If it was truly a precaution there would be user facing notifications of battery degredation like on the Mac.

38. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Maybe, maybe not. Apple has its way of doing things.

37. Back_from_beyond

Posts: 1377; Member since: Sep 04, 2015

Except it's not a precaution, it's to hide the fact that the iPhone was designed to only last 1 year at normal use. People that buy iPhones expect them to last at least two years but the strain the A series SoCs put on the battery makes them last less than 500 charge cycles, which for most is around 18 months before the battery degradation dips below the expected 80% max capacity. So to hide the fact that their high performance SoC has degraded the battery to a point it can't handle it's maximum anymore, Apple reduced the performance with the intention to make it seem as if nothing was the matter. That's not a precaution, that's hiding an intentional design characteristic/flaw. Apple could have opted to simply reduce the maximum performance of their A series SoCs from the start to reduce the strain on the battery and allow the batteries to last longer. Instead they opted to reduce maximum performance when the battery can no longer support it and it becomes noticeably slower. So performance wise they may be better for a time, but overall Apple's A series SoCs are not better by design. A SoC that kills your battery much quicker than the competition does, can't by definition be better. I used to own an Xperia Z1 and after 3,5 years of use, charging it daily, it's performance did not diminish. Yet a 1 year old iPhone is in need of reduced performance because the battery can't handle it. That's poor design or intentional design.

39. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Dude, I honest didn’t even read past the first 5-6 words. I just don’t care enough to do so. I scrolled to the bottom, and saw it was to me.

21. BuffaloSouce unregistered

Only for the 1st year, that hilarious...what about the millions of older iPhones that are running without issues?

30. guest

Posts: 371; Member since: Jun 13, 2012

Without issues at less than half of the advertised speed. Ok sure. I gave up my year and a half old SE because doing basic things like launching the camera app took 5-10 seconds which is ridiculous when trying to take pictures of your toddler. That update absolutely rendered my phone useless.

40. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

It took you 5-10 seconds to launch the camera? Hmmmm...

25. Ralph.

Posts: 249; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

Lol Apple is using a larger die while Android is using smaller die. Obviously A11 will win. If Exynos was build as same as A11, Exynos will win. Also A11 is using 8mb cache while Exynos and Sd835 is using 3mb cache, just imagine Android had 8mb cache , Android Cpu you will always kick assss apples a11.

3. guest

Posts: 371; Member since: Jun 13, 2012

Why?? I don't want my phone to throttle down to 40% performance after 2 years

9. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

The messed up thing is, even at 40% performance, the iPhone was still faster than the majority of Android flagships, up until iOS 11 that is.

10. kryme

Posts: 468; Member since: Oct 24, 2013

Maybe but after two years it’s kinda use less... I’m worried about my iPad Pro 10.5 cause I wanna keep it for atlease 3 years while doing what I have been doing since day one...

11. Arch_Fiend

Posts: 3951; Member since: Oct 03, 2015

Pay to have a battery replacement after two years then, it's only $105.

16. Jrod99

Posts: 714; Member since: Jan 15, 2016

My Air 2 and 6s plus still runs smooth enough minus the occasional stutter.

22. BuffaloSouce unregistered

And they will continue to run smooth. People on this site want to blow everything out of proportion and make it as every single Apple product is affected

18. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

My Air 2 never had any slowdowns. It ran lights out fast, up to the time I sold it.

19. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

My Air 2 never had any slowdowns. It ran lights out fast, up to the time I sold it. I hope my X doesn’t experience them, but it might. I upgrade every year tops though, so I’m good.

24. Jrod99

Posts: 714; Member since: Jan 15, 2016

Did you get another x Dark?

29. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Yes sirrr. A 256 gig on Craigslist for $600. AT&T space grey.

31. Jrod99

Posts: 714; Member since: Jan 15, 2016

That’s a good deal. Easier pill to swallow.

33. darkkjedii

Posts: 30966; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Much easier.

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