Samsung's Galaxy S9 sales hit record-lows in South Korea, iPhone X too

Samsung's Galaxy S9 sales hit record-lows in South Korea, iPhone X too
A new report claims the latest flagships from Samsung and Apple are seeing record-low sales in South Korea. It has previously been reported a number of times that Apple has been forced to cut iPhone X orders due to lower-than-expected demand, and this appears to have spread to South Korea. Unfortunately for Samsung, however, its brand also appears to be tackling weak demand.

According to the data obtained by ET News, Apple managed to shift just 475,000 units of the iPhone X via the major South Korean carriers over the course of its first four months, with a peak of 163,000 devices in December and a low of 70,000 in February. The latter figure of which is very weak when the lack of rival launches is taken into account over the tracking timeframe. Also, the total number of units over the period marks the lowest-ever sales figures for an iPhone launch in the country. 

In regards to Samsung, the brand certainly faired better than Apple, managing to ship a total of 707,000 Galaxy S9 and S9+ units via carriers since the line’s March launch. However, despite the higher numbers, it’s worth noting that South Korea is the brand’s home country, a territory where its flagship devices tend to perform extremely well. Unfortunately for the giant, though, the sales of its new devices have also set a new record-low for the brand. In fact, for reference, last year’s Galaxy S8 line managed to ship a respectable 1 million units over the two-month period.

Coinciding with a number of previous reports, the cause of the weak demand is once again said to be the higher pricing of the new flagship devices, and the latest report goes on to warn that the slowing sales could potentially become a long-term trend in the premium smartphone market.

source: The Investor via: Patently Apple

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46 Comments

1. torr310

Posts: 1659; Member since: Oct 27, 2011

Mid range CPU with high end camera selling at $350 should attract more sales.

19. Cat97

Posts: 1892; Member since: Mar 02, 2017

They know this and that's why they don't build such phones.

34. piyath

Posts: 2445; Member since: Mar 23, 2012

"cause of the weak demand is once again said to be the higher pricing of the new flagship devices" The thing is iPhone is $999 where as S9 is just $720. That means S9 is not that pricey at all compared to the iPhone and still manages to flop like a mother. And also S9 released just 2 months a go, so which has the upper hand in terms of fresh factor? S9 again. Another point is that Apple released another two devices (8/8 plus) along side the iPhone X, so......... once again S9 is proven to be a flop in their own country compared to iPhone X. Android market as a whole is so divided lately due to so very powerful feature rich value smartphones from OEMs like Oneplus, Nokia, Motorola, Huawei, Xiaomi and Vivo.Samsung is a rough spot in the mobile buisiness no matter how you look at it.

36. USuck

Posts: 76; Member since: Apr 07, 2018

And the joke is that most major apps still run in 32bit on Android. Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, and even "Samsung Internet" that comes preloaded on Sammy's 64bit flagships. ROFL.

38. worldpeace

Posts: 3133; Member since: Apr 15, 2016

And what's wrong with 32-bit apps? it's not like 64-bit apps is better than 32-bit anyway.

39. BlackhawkFlys

Posts: 914; Member since: May 07, 2014

S9 is the competitor of iPhone 8, not the iPhone X. iPhone X's competitor is S9+ moron.

40. Sammy_DEVIL737

Posts: 1529; Member since: Nov 28, 2016

Lmao never saw you commenting in that article where PA stated that Galaxy S9/S9+ are the top selling flagship in India. Where were you is#eep?

45. deleon629

Posts: 461; Member since: Oct 04, 2014

After visiting South Korea, I noticed that the domestic market is still saturated with Note8 phones, the resell of the note 7 FE not too long ago, and mid-range devices taking full advantage of the top-notch nationwide connectivity. People generally have a hard time getting rid of old phones there b/c the connectivity and customer service is superb. When you use a phone in a place where there's no such thing as "illegal throttling," you don't need over-the-top specs

2. haruken

Posts: 306; Member since: Nov 06, 2013

Everyone is waiting for the S10. The iPhone X on the other hand is already the 'omg 10y anniversary'.

6. midan

Posts: 2869; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

Actually the problem is that people are waiting other than Samsung phones, S10 won't make any difference.

9. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

What? I can barely make sense of your sentence. People wanting to buy other smartphones is not something new, it's called competition and everyone is affected by it, and it definitely seems to affect Apple. Samsung isn't really affected by it any more than usual, their market share is pretty consistent, even with the increasing competition from Chinese manufacturers, which is undercutting everyone's prices, especially Apple's. Samsung still has the highest market share out of every smartphone brand out there. Lastly, the Galaxy S10 is Samsung's anniversary phone. An anniversary phone brings a lot of excitement and hype, as they're bound to be something special. You were very hyped by the iPhone X yourself, as it was an anniversary phone, so it's ridiculous for you to assume that other wouldn't feel the same about another anniversary phone. I have the Galaxy S9, and yet i'm still excited for the Samsung Galaxy S10, as it's an anniversary phone from one of the innovative smartphone companies. It would be weird to not be excited when the biggest smartphone manufacturer is building an anniversary phone, which is why every enthusiast is interested and intrigued.

11. NateDiaz

Posts: 1088; Member since: Mar 03, 2018

My university professor would have rated you 10/10, she loves reading stories.

12. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

It's literally lass than 200 words, which is even far below elementary school levels, so if you have an issue with reading something that short, then i really don't know what to say. The average person reads 300 words per minute, so it would literally take around 35 seconds to read.

16. NateDiaz

Posts: 1088; Member since: Mar 03, 2018

I don't think anyone bothers reading 189 words and 206 words paragraphs on a site like PhoneArena. The more you say, the less people remember. And, reading and comprehending are two different things. Someone reading 300 words/minute might not grab that all.

23. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

300 words per minute is the average for an adult, while also being able to comprehend and understand what they're reading. I didn't think it was necessary to specify that, as that would take more words to explain, and you hate when people use words to be precise.

26. NateDiaz

Posts: 1088; Member since: Mar 03, 2018

300 words per minute is actually a lot for someone not native.

35. rouyal

Posts: 1582; Member since: Jan 05, 2018

TechSceptic could power a hot air balloon with all that hot air.

3. NateDiaz

Posts: 1088; Member since: Mar 03, 2018

iPhone X is 6 months old now, S9 launched last month.

4. cncrim

Posts: 1588; Member since: Aug 15, 2011

No cheap phone getting good.

46. deleon629

Posts: 461; Member since: Oct 04, 2014

Let's be honest with ourselves, here: A 6-month old iPhone is practically only 3 years young in terms of resell value, updates, and the engine power required to run the restricted, boring'1-trick pony' known as iOS.

5. imkyle

Posts: 1115; Member since: Nov 18, 2010

It's also hard dropping $800-$1000 for a phone when companies like Oneplus and Essential are doing amazing phones for half of the price.

28. JohnR

Posts: 151; Member since: Sep 08, 2017

It's also harder not to hold on to your current phone until something truly enticing comes along. Especially if your current phone perfoms they way you like. Samsung and Apple are victims of their own success. Last generations phones aren't worth upgrading yet

7. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

I think we're just seeing an overall downward trend for premium flagships, as people aren't really racing out to buy a new smartphone ever year anymore. I will say that the Galaxy S9 doesn't seem too far off target, as it sold 707000 in 1.5 months, as it was released the 16th of march. If we assume it's going to sell at the same pace, then it's going to hit about 950000 devices sold at the 2 month mark, which is quite close to the 1 million mark of the S8's. I think there is also an argument to be made for the Galaxy S9, but it's difficult to make for the iPhone X. The Galaxy S9 is the generation right before the anniversary edition Galaxy S10, so it would be somewhat realistic to assume that some consumers are choosing to wait a single generation, as they're very interested in buying the anniversary smartphone for Samsung, the Galaxy S10. The iPhone X is the anniversary smartphone, so it already is as exciting as it possibly could be, so the lower sales numbers might just be a trend that Apple has to get used to. It will be interesting to see how well the Anniversary Galaxy S10 smartphone sells.

10. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

If you honestly believe that they (Samsung) will have an “anniversary” edition series, let alone one that the average consumer will care about, more power to you. Maybe South Koreans will care (homegrown products yada yada) but the majority of the world doesn’t consider the S series worthy of such celebration. Hell, the first edition of said series was a 1to1 iPhone clone. You have also seemed to have forgotten that despite this “decline” in sales, the iPhone X has still outsold every phone on Earth by a pretty substantial margin.

15. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

Ah yes, because anniversary phones have proven to not be exciting for the average consumer at all, right? No one cared about the iPhone X, right? Anniversary phones clearly bring hype and excitement, just like an anniversary typically does. It's something special, not just within the smartphone world, and people are familiar with anniversary products and events. "Maybe South Koreans will care (homegrown products yada yada) but the majority of the world doesn’t consider the S series worthy of such celebration." This is just beyond biased. Has Samsung hurt you or something? Are you okay? Sure, South Koreans will obviously care, just like Americans care about their American brand (Apple), but the rest of the world cares as well. Android has 80-85% of the smartphone market share, and Samsung has the highest share out of every brand. People are definitely intrigued when the largest smartphone manufacturer in the world launches an anniversary phone. "the iPhone X has still outsold every phone on Earth by a pretty substantial margin" When a company only launches 3 smartphones a year, then you're obviously going to sell a lot, especially to Americans, because of "homegrown products yada yada". Companies like Samsung launches a hell of a lot more products a year, which is why they sell the most, even though they don't have the best selling model.

20. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

People didn’t care that the iPX was an anniversary edition variant. They did, however, care that it had a different form factor than the previous generation. And no, I have nothing against SK or their citizenry. Its simply fact that governments in that part of the world ACTIVELY PUSH NATIVE BRANDS towards consumers. Nearly a quarter of SK’s GDP comes directly via Samsung for crying out loud. Lastly, you don’t seem to understand your own message. If all it took to make waves in this industry was a small selection of products, Google would be thriving with their Pixel series, would they not? But that isn’t the case, is it? There are numerous factors as to why Apple is the juggernaut it is at selling premium devices, and product selection size does play a role. However, to account all their success to said selection alone is asinine and dismissive.

25. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

"And no, I have nothing against SK or their citizenry." If you say so, but i'm remaining sceptical. "Its simply fact that governments in that part of the world ACTIVELY PUSH NATIVE BRANDS towards consumers" They do, but not as much as the US push native brands towards consumers. South Korea doesn't ban other companies from entering their market, while the US regularly bans major Chinese brands from even entering the market. The US and China are the worst offernders when it comes to pushing their native brands above every other brand.

27. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

Let me stop you right there: The United States government may do a lot of s**tty things, but pushing native products is NOT one of them. If anything, they want people buying less iPhones as they have harder encryption to crack than your run of the mill Android phone. Most people carry an iPhone of their own volition, just like ordinary android users.

29. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

Oh really? Please tell me how the Chinese brands are doing in the US? It seems they're having some trouble selling them there, it's almost like government level agencies told the US to not buy Chinese phones. Oh right, they did.

33. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

You understand that alienating foreign brands is not the same as promoting domestic ones, don’t you?

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