x PhoneArena is hiring! Reviewer in the USA
  • Hidden picShow menu
  • Home
  • News
  • TSMC refutes 10nm delay reports, new Apple and Qualcomm processors on track

TSMC refutes 10nm delay reports, new Apple and Qualcomm processors on track

Posted: , by Luis D.

Tags :

TSMC refutes 10nm delay reports, new Apple and Qualcomm processors on track
Less than a week ago, a report from Taiwan suggested that local chipset production powerhouse TSMC may have skipped a beat on its 10nm fabrication process, potentially leading to delays for upcoming products such as Apple's rumored new iPads.

Thankfully, the company refuted said report and ensured everyone that the 10nm process is "totally on track." It also shared that the 10nm process will make up less than 1% of its overall revenue throughout the first quarter of 2017, despite high-profile orders by the likes of Apple and Qualcomm. TSMC will be producing the A10 and A11 chips to be used in Apple's iOS products of 2017, along with Qualcomm's premium-tier Snapdragon 835 processor. Hopefully, we can rest assured that these important chipsets will be ready just in time for the prolific product launches that await us next year.

Throughout 2017, TSMC will ramp up 7nm production proceeding with the 5nm process in 2019 and 3nm process by 2022. TSMC, along with fellow silicone slingers Intel and Samsung intend to take chipset geometries to an "effective" 1nm, using three-dimensional approaches to probe beyond the 10nm limit proposed by Moore's law. However, Intel believes its 10nm process, which will be used for the creation of ARM architecture-based mobile chips ordered by the likes of LG Electronics, can outperform its rivals.

ALSO READ

16 Comments
  • Options
    Close






posted on 27 Dec 2016, 22:33 2

1. domfonusr (Posts: 442; Member since: 17 Jan 2014)


At some point, the junctions will be small enough that quantum effects will overwhelm the voltage between switches, and barrier-tunneling will result in signals going to places they weren't intended to go. Once that limit is reached, there will be no way to usefully make the transistors any smaller, and so I wonder how close we are to that limit.

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 22:42

3. Unordinary (Posts: 2019; Member since: 04 Nov 2015)


TSMC is already testing 4nm production for Apple. Not sure it was reported here but it was news a few weeks ago on other sites

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 22:53

4. domfonusr (Posts: 442; Member since: 17 Jan 2014)


The article here said they are planning on having 1nm processes at some point. That is on the order of just 10 or so atoms thick! At some point, the ability of an electron to be at more than one location at a time, and to be able to be on both sides of a barrier with considerable probability (as the barrier potential falls with decreasing size), will overwhelm the separation between junctions, and electrons will leap across transistor switches that are not turned on - quantum effects will overwhelm the designed paths in the electronics at some very small scale. I just wonder at what scale they expect that to happen.

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 01:00 1

9. ctdog4748 (Posts: 763; Member since: 05 Mar 2016)


Here is a very interesting article on the subject;

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602592/worlds-smallest-transistor-is-cool-but-wont-save-moores-law/amp/?client=safari

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 15:00

15. domfonusr (Posts: 442; Member since: 17 Jan 2014)


Oh, that is wild! I wish they would talk more about the specifics of the technique that they've used, but still, very interesting indeed.

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 00:34

8. Ticklemyfancy (Posts: 144; Member since: 09 Oct 2016)


I guess it'll saturate at 1nm unless newer technologies and discoveries are made.

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 22:37

2. trojan_horse (Posts: 2569; Member since: 06 May 2016)


"It also shared that the 10nm process will make up less than 1% of its overall revenue throughout the first quarter of 2017, despite high-profile orders by the likes of Apple and Qualcomm"

What? Isn't the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 fabbed using Samsung's 10nm process?

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 23:11 1

5. vincelongman (Posts: 4671; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


Probably the Qualcomm Centriq 2400 (their server SoC)

When they announced the 835 they specifically said Samsung
https://www.qualcomm.com/news/releases/2016/11/17/qualcomm-and-samsung-collaborate-10nm-process-technology-latest-snapdragon

But for the Qualcomm Centriq 2400 they just said its 10nm
https://www.qualcomm.com/news/releases/2016/12/07/qualcomm-begins-commercial-sampling-worlds-first-10nm-server-processor-and
So it could be Samsung or TSMC, might not decided yet

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 01:01 1

10. trojan_horse (Posts: 2569; Member since: 06 May 2016)


Thanks for the valuable info, @vincelongman... I appreciate it.

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 02:19

11. vincelongman (Posts: 4671; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


You're welcome :D

posted on 29 Dec 2016, 08:18

16. AmashAziz (Posts: 497; Member since: 30 Jun 2014)


You have become much better since the last time I saw you......great work!

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 23:54

6. WPX00 (Posts: 367; Member since: 15 Aug 2015)


835 is to be manufactured by Samsung/GlobalFoundries, not TSMC.

posted on 27 Dec 2016, 23:55

7. Tizo101 (Posts: 507; Member since: 05 Jun 2015)


can't wait for 1nm, but there are many drawbacks at that point. After 5nm everything is gonna be extra hard to do.

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 06:04

13. Sidewinder (Posts: 456; Member since: 15 Jan 2015)


Yield issue along with current leakage from gates would be the technological hurdle to be overcome

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 02:54

12. xondk (Posts: 1674; Member since: 25 Mar 2014)


isn't it the same thing every year?

"Delays with next iphone"
"Iphone is out but short supply"

Making people rush to try to get one, and then later we find out the 'low' supply wasn't true, but simply a sale's method, nothing 'wrong' in it, but seems to be repeating?

posted on 28 Dec 2016, 06:19

14. Iodine (Posts: 1357; Member since: 19 Jun 2014)


10 nm better be matured to make up for a beastly 3-billion plus transistor A10X.

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Latest stories