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Liquid cooling or 'thermal spreader': check out the S7 edge heat pipe insides (video)

Liquid cooling or 'thermal spreader': check out the S7 edge heat pipe insides (video)
Back when the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge were announced last week, the first teardowns of the handsets revealed some sort of a heat pipe running around the processor area, presumably a tiny liquid cooling system, like the ones on Sony's high-end Xperias, or the Lumia 950. Samsung then confirmed that the phones do indeed feature this, when talking about its new Game Launcher setup: "the cooling system in these phones, with a very thin thermal spreader, keeps devices cool, so gamers can focus on winning."

There you have it, we definitely don't have liquid nitrogen running in your phone, being pumped by tiny goblins to swoosh elegantly around the CPU in clouds of frozen mist. What we do have, however, is flatter copper piping with a minuscule amount of liquid, often just water, that evaporates when it hits the CPU area, takes the heat away with the gas it forms, and condenses back into liquid when it runs further down the pipe, like on the scheme here:

Liquid cooling or 'thermal spreader': check out the S7 edge heat pipe insides (video)

Samsung itself calls it simply a "thermal spreader," instead of liquid cooling, though technically we likely do have a drop of liquid in there, and it's made on a very, very compact scale. Want to see how it actually looks like from the inside? Well, the video below comes to the rescue, from about 4:30 in, and you also get to see the other set of tiny goblins - the ones that are trying to hold the camera steady when you shoot video, or the so-called optical image stabilization. It's fascinating, check it out.



source: ZDNet & Celsia

29 Comments
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posted on 07 Mar 2016, 02:56 5

1. someone12 (Posts: 177; Member since: 28 Aug 2015)


I don't see any liquid, I call BS on that.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:12 4

4. NoToFanboys (Posts: 1022; Member since: 03 Oct 2015)


Google "vapor chamber"

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:21 2

5. vincelongman (Posts: 3979; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


Yep
I'd say heat pipe since its narrow, vapor chamber are usually wider
But they are the same thing, just difference in width

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:57 1

18. Aploine (Posts: 425; Member since: 24 Oct 2013)


Or vapor pipe :)) From outside it looks like solid but inside is filled with copper fibers and a another kind of metal aluminum or something. It woud be expensive to be solid copper I guess

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 11:45

28. engineer-1701d (Posts: 3214; Member since: 13 Mar 2014)


either way without having a fan to move medium over condenser its not going to dump much of the heat and turn back to liquid, i wonder what freon is being used

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 04:45 2

22. HonestRealist (Posts: 196; Member since: 25 Jan 2016)


I create vapour chambers in my car all the time... I vape. I vote. I lol.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:24 2

8. vincelongman (Posts: 3979; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


It has pressurized liquid/vapour, which would evaporate when cut open due to pressurize difference

The Sony heat pipe would have had a different liquid/vapour and different pressurize
Maybe lower pressurize since the 810 gets hotter, it doesn't need as high pressurize to reduce its boiling point
So not all the liquid in the Sony heat pipe vapourised

All the 950 XL's heat pipe also vapourised when Jerry cut it

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:32 2

11. vincelongman (Posts: 3979; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


Edit:

It has pressurized liquid/vapour, which would vapourise when cut open due to pressure difference

All the liquid in the 950 XL's heat pipe also vapourised when Jerry cut it

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 04:43 2

21. Nathan_ingx (Posts: 3605; Member since: 07 Mar 2012)


They guy was like, "Let me put it all back in and it will be as good as new". I bet that copper pipe he ripped will not mend on it's own!
It's amazing to see how people have managed to fit so many things in one small device! I won't be surprised to see a fridge in there. :D

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:33 1

12. kenfold (Posts: 16; Member since: 06 Mar 2016)


This site is a joke.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:38 1

14. kenfold (Posts: 16; Member since: 06 Mar 2016)


Checkout -samsung.com/global/in-depth-look-taking-mobile-ga​ming-to-an-entirely-new-level-the-new-gaming-featu​res-of-the-galaxy-s7-and-galaxy-s7-edge

Optimized for Better Performance

With a more than 30 percent faster CPU speed, a more than 60 percent faster GPU speed and 4GB of RAM, the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge have the power needed to satisfy the most demanding players, in the most intense games. With a very thin thermal spreader cooling system, these phones can run fast and cool.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:44 4

15. kenfold (Posts: 16; Member since: 06 Mar 2016)


How Samsung plans to keep the Galaxy S7 cool

Samsung hopes to address any overheating issues with the Galaxy

As hardware makers cram more power into smartphones, the heat produced by the CPU and GPU becomes more of a problem. Samsung hopes to address this issue with the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge by using liquid cooling.

"Whoa, liquid cooling?" I hear you scream at your screens. "Doesn't that mean pipes and radiators and water and so on?"

The sort of liquid cooling we're talking about here isn't like the liquid cooling systems that performance gamers use to cool their PCs. Instead, what we're talking about here is a closed-loop heat pipe technology.

There's still a liquid involved, but only a drop, and this is safely held inside metal tubes that are made of copper or aluminum. The liquid, which in this case is probably water or ethylene glycol, passes over an evaporator where it is exposed to the heat of the CPU of GPU. Here it is turned into a gas, and this vapor then makes its way along tiny tubes to a diffusion plate or radiator, where the heat is given off and the vapor turns back into a liquid and then makes its way back to the evaporator.

Note that the diffusion plate doesn't feature a fan or such, and there are no pumps inside the heat pipe moving the liquid and vapor about. It's a purely passive device, and its purpose is to take the heat from the CPU and GPU and dissipate it over a larger area, preventing the formation of hot-spots, and hopefully putting an end to overheating (which was a problem that Qualcomm had with the Snapdragon 810).

All of this sounds big and clumsy, but it isn't. Fujitsu has a heat pipe system designed specifically for smartphones where the pipes are only 0.1mm thick, and the evaporator and diffusion plates are only 0.6mm and 1.0mm thick, respectively.

And the Samsung Galaxy S7 isn't the first smartphone to feature liquid cooling. Microsoft's Lumia 950 and Lumia 950xl both use liquid cooling. Sony's use of the technology goes further back, to the Xperia X2, which was released in March of 2014.

Why use liquid cooling? It's probably being used for a number of reasons. First, Qualcomm had problems with the Snapdragon 810 overheating, a problem that resulted in Samsung passing up on the chip for the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. The liquid cooling would certainly help to prevent this issue from happening again.

Another reason is that smartphone makers are using more and more glass in their smartphones. Because glass is a poor conductor of heat, hot spots can form on the device, and even if the back is metal, these hot spots can make the device uncomfortable to hold when it's running demanding apps.

Also, let's not forget that "liquid cooled" looks good on the sales material. I have little doubt that by this time next year, every major smartphone manufacturer (with the exception of Apple) will be touting liquid cooling as a feature on high-end devices.

source: ZDNet

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 11:10 3

27. Subie (Posts: 436; Member since: 01 Aug 2015)


Techie, did you open a second account?

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 04:55 2

24. kumaran555 (Posts: 13; Member since: 07 Mar 2016)


iPhone arena is a Samsung hater site And f**ker site
( Apple's cowards). This site and its writers are apple-biased.

The exaggeration in this post. It's not really an issue. Read the source: ZDNet .What part of "you are a complete brainless f**king idiot" do you not understand?

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 20:49

30. Hypergy (Posts: 54; Member since: 24 Feb 2016)


This is actual technology used in spaceships. Get reckted m8

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:12

3. Aploine (Posts: 425; Member since: 24 Oct 2013)


Make it all out of copper

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:29 1

10. vincelongman (Posts: 3979; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


It was pressurized liquid, which uses evaporative cooling to transfer the heat more efficiently than just copper

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:37 2

13. Aploine (Posts: 425; Member since: 24 Oct 2013)


Rad. I was referring to the whole phone. Imagine shiny copper looks

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:59 1

19. vincelongman (Posts: 3979; Member since: 10 Feb 2013)


Oh sorry

That would be great in terms of thermals
But copper isn't as strong as magnesium alloy, might be heavier too

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 06:07

26. TerryTerius (Posts: 1441; Member since: 10 Apr 2014)


Do you frequent Reddit?

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:22 2

6. Quduz (Posts: 75; Member since: 18 Aug 2015)


better than nexus and sony liquid cooling.exynos 8890 throttles less than 5% cpu score 2195-2036 gpu onscreen 27-25fps.SD version gpu throttles lessential than 810 29fps-23fps

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 04:46 2

23. bur60 (Posts: 821; Member since: 07 Jul 2014)


Saying Sony and Nexus liquid cooler is worse while comparing different cpus? (810 is a dragon)

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:22

7. jamesbradley (Posts: 10; Member since: 29 Feb 2016)


nice post.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:24

9. Quduz (Posts: 75; Member since: 18 Aug 2015)


better than nexus and sony liquid cooling.exynos 8890 throttles less than 5% cpu score 2195-2036 gpu onscreen 27-25fps.SD version gpu throttles less than 810 29fps-23fps

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:50

16. RoboticEngi (Posts: 550; Member since: 03 Dec 2014)


If it wasnt for liquids, why make it hollow? If it was just using the copper as passive heat spreading material, why not make it solid? Please answer that iPA?

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 03:53 1

17. Tarox (Posts: 102; Member since: 17 Feb 2015)


oh my god phone arena... Please don't be THAT dumb... please...

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 04:24

20. Arschsalat (banned) (Posts: 158; Member since: 29 Feb 2016)


Rumors: Xiaomi Mi5 Users have overheating issues.

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 19:59

29. ibend (Posts: 3192; Member since: 30 Sep 2014)


the cheaper version wont have that problem since it have underclocked SD820

posted on 07 Mar 2016, 05:42

25. robertdenaro116 (Posts: 55; Member since: 07 Mar 2016)


Actual research from the hacks that write at this site is a stretch.

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