Top five tablets with octa-core processors


Over the past few years, mobile processors have gone from single-core designs to dual-core designs, more recently to quad-core architectures, and now even to octa-core architectures. While the raw processing power of a single core is really what matters the most towards providing the best user experience, there are cases when more cores equal better performance. Although the utility of octa-core processors on smartphones and tablets is still debatable, an increasing number of customers are now looking to purchase devices with as many cores as possible.

With that in mind, we've decided it's time to compile a list of the best tablets with octa-core processors. Interestingly, while octa-core smartphones are somewhat abundant, only a few tablet manufacturers decided to tempt tablet customers with octa-core processors, which is very interesting given that tablets are the mobile devices which are best suited for productivity work and serious number crunching. Furthermore, we have to note that all of the octa-core tablets currently available run on Android. 

Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4


To kick off our list of tablets with octa-core processors, let's talk about the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4, probably the best mid-sized Android tablet that money can currently purchase. The Tab S 8.4 is based on the Exynos 5 Octa, a mobile chip developed in-house by Samsung that integrates an octa-core processor which actually consists of four power-efficient ARM Cortex-A7 cores clocked at 1.3GHz and four high-performance ARM Cortex-A15 cores clocked at 1.9GHz. Depending on the use-case scenario, the tablet will go one or the other core group. This is possible thanks to an ARM technology called Big.LITTLE. 

The Galaxy Tab S series was launched with Android 4.4 KitKat, but the Wi-Fi only models have been updated to Android 5.0 Lollipop in the meantime.

Note that just the Wi-Fi only version of the Tab S 8.4 comes with an octa-core processor, the LTE version being powered by the quad-core processor featured by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 chip.

Aside from the Exynos 5 Octa, the Galaxy Tab S 8.4 also comes with a bright and vivid 8.4-inch Super AMOLED display with a resolution of 1600 by 2560 pixels, 3GB of RAM, either 16GB or 32GB of integrated storage space, a microSD card slot, an 8MP primary camera, a 2MP secondary camera and a 4900 mAh battery. For more details, read our Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 review.

The Wi-Fi only Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 with 16GB of integrated storage is priced at $399 at Amazon.


Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5


If the 8.4-inch version of the Galaxy Tab S leaves you wanting for more Super AMOLED screen real estate, then the 10.5-inch version is probably the octa-core tablet you're looking for. Like its smaller brother, the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 is based on the Exynos 5 Octa, comes with 3GB of RAM, an 8MP primary camera, and a 2.1MP secondary camera. To make up for the higher power consumption ratios of the larger display, Samsung fitted in a larger 7900 mAh battery. For more details on the tablet, head on to our full Galaxy Tab S 10.5 review.

The Wi-Fi only Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 with 16GB of internal storage is priced at $479 at Amazon.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014)


Back when it launched in October 2013, the 3G and Wi-Fi only versions of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014) were the first octa-core tablets in the world. The processor is the same Exynos 5 Octa that you can find inside the 8.4 and 10.5 versions of the Samsung Galaxy Tab S, meaning that customers get a four ARM Cortex-A15 cores clocked at 1.9GHz, and four additional ARM Cortex-A7 cores clocked at 1.3GHz. The Exynos 5 Octa is paired with 3GB of RAM.

The Note 10.1 2014 launched with Android 4.3 on board, but has since been updated to Android 4.4 KitKat.

Other specs include 3GB of RAM, a 10.1-inch LCD panel with a resolution of 1600 by 2560 pixels that also comes with stylus support, 16GB/32GB/64GB internal storage options, a microSD card slot, an 8MP primary camera, and a 2MP secondary shooter. All of these components are powered by an 8220mAh battery. Learn more about this tablet by reading our full Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 review.

The Wi-Fi only version of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 with 16GB of internal storage is priced at $494.99 at Amazon.


Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet


Moving on to tablets from other manufacturers, the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet deserves a spot on our list. At the moment, the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet is the only tablet that comes with a Snapdragon 810 chipset, which is the same chip that you're going to find powering flagship smartphones such as the HTC One M9. The Snapdragon 810 comes with four power efficient ARM Cortex-A53 cores clocked at 1.5GHz, as well as four additional high-performance ARM Cortex-A57 cores clocked at 2.0GHz. According to benchmarks, the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet is one of the fastest tablets currently available. The Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet runs Android 5.0 Lollipop.

Aside from the Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 chip, the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet also comes with 3GB of RAM, 32GB of integrated storage space, a microSD card slot, optional LTE connectivity, an 8.1MP primary camera and a 5.1MP secondary camera. The display is a 10.1-inch IPS-class panel running at 1600 by 2560 pixels. All of these specs are powered by a 6000mAh battery. Although one of the fastest tablets around, the Xperia Z4 Tablet also impresses with its design: at just 6.1mm in thickness, the Xperia Z4 Tablet is the slimmest octa-core tablet that you're going to find, and it's also IP68-certified dust and waterproof. If you're looking to use the Z4 Tablet for productivity work, Sony also offers a keyboard dock.

The Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet is not currently available for purchase in the United States. In Europe, pre-order prices range at about €559 for the Wi-Fi model without a bundled Bluetooth keyboard.


Cube Talk 9X


Although all of the previous four tablets mentioned above come, in theory, with octa core processors, you've likely noted that there are four speedy cores and four less powerful cores. In other words, you can think of these octa-core processors as two separate quad-core processors that work together to process tasks depending on the required level of performance. This changes with the Cube Talk 9X, an iPad Air clone that's powered by MediaTek's MTK8392, a true octa-core chip that integrates eight ARM Cortex-A7 cores clocked at 2GHz. 

Other specs include a 9.7-inch IPS display with a resolution of 1536 by 2048 pixels, 2GB of RAM, either 16GB or 32GB of internal storage, a microSD card slot, 3G connectivity, an 8MP primary camera, a 2MP secondary sensor, and a large 10000mAh battery. The Cube Talk 9X runs Android 4.4 KitKat.

While the four previous tablets are widely available in both the US and Europe, the Cube Talk 9X is a Chinese tablet that you'll have to import. Prices range at about $170 for 16GB model

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37 Comments

1. hunted

Posts: 403; Member since: Sep 21, 2011

Except Samsung everything is True Octacore?

9. TyrionLannister unregistered

What is meant by true octa core? Apparently, there are two meanings. One is associated with the mediatek marketing term. In that case, only mediatek processors can be named true octa core. But that makes even z4 tablet out of that. I don't think you meant that The other meaning is associated with running all 8 cores simultaneously. In that case, the Samsung tablets here don't support HMP due to their aged exynos 5420 chip. HMP was enabled from 5422. I hope you meant this. Though it has relation with the chip itself and not Samsung. For example, note 4 exynos and s6 can run all 8 cores despite being Samsung. What I mean by octa core is that an SoC should have 8 functioning cores. In that sense, all of them are octa core. Though some of them don't run all 8 cores together. Anyway, iPad air 2 with just 3 cores and nexus 9 with 2 cores can destroy these tablets without even working hard, both in benchmarks and in real life performance. So much for octa core LOL. Better cores > more cores.

11. hassoups

Posts: 473; Member since: Jun 06, 2013

let's be honest and not even associate the nexus 9 with performance.

13. Tritinum

Posts: 471; Member since: May 06, 2014

umm why? k1 isn't that bad

16. hassoups

Posts: 473; Member since: Jun 06, 2013

The nexus 9 lags... a lot.

17. Awalker

Posts: 1977; Member since: Aug 15, 2013

Yeah but it benchmarks high and that's what a lot of people on tech sites care about.

19. hunted

Posts: 403; Member since: Sep 21, 2011

Thank you Tyrion. Very good explanation :)

27. hound.master

Posts: 1044; Member since: Feb 27, 2015

I agree with you having more cores doesn't mean having more power and also having more power doesn't mean more capabilities these tablets are not that good compare to a Windows pro one.

31. alex3run

Posts: 715; Member since: May 18, 2014

Lol, Exynos 5433 wipes out Tegra K1 Denver in CPU performance. I don't even mention Exynos 7420 (btw it has GPU comparable to Tegra K1's one).

34. TyrionLannister unregistered

These tablets have exynos 5420. There's no 5433 here

35. alex3run

Posts: 715; Member since: May 18, 2014

Still there's no huge gap between e5420 and dual core Tegra. Strange that PA has forgotten Tab S Plus with e5433 inside.

22. Noonting

Posts: 135; Member since: Sep 19, 2014

Qualcomm S810 isn't true octa core too

37. alex3run

Posts: 715; Member since: May 18, 2014

No, it is. Two different core types do not mean they cannot work simultaniously.

2. g2a5b0e unregistered

Did anyone else have a "what the eff is this?" moment when they got to the Cube Talk 9X? I know I did.

3. mihai.a

Posts: 47; Member since: Apr 15, 2015

@hunted: No, the Cube Talk 9X is the only true octa-core tablet included in this list.

5. hunted

Posts: 403; Member since: Sep 21, 2011

Thanks Mihai

7. rf1975

Posts: 264; Member since: Aug 01, 2011

Yes, it is true octa-core. performance also good enough. but WiFi reception is bit floppy. other than that no other issue with the cube talk 9x.

4. anleoflippy

Posts: 596; Member since: Jan 03, 2013

The Galaxy Tab S 8.4 is a good tablet. My dad uses it everyday for business stuff and phone calls. Yes, his tablet is for phone calls too.

8. Awalker

Posts: 1977; Member since: Aug 15, 2013

Does he hold the tablet to his ear?

21. hurrycanger

Posts: 1761; Member since: Dec 01, 2013

Hint: the Tab S has speakers.

6. Sauce5 unregistered

cPad 9x.

10. Taters

Posts: 6474; Member since: Jan 28, 2013

I am just waiting for the tab s 2 to come out so I can buy it.

12. mio15

Posts: 38; Member since: Mar 21, 2011

Hi, just to let you know. The Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014) Gallery actually shows the predecessor the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. You can spot that by the "huge" screen bezel und front facing speakers. greetings

15. mihai.a

Posts: 47; Member since: Apr 15, 2015

Thanks for your observation ! We've updated the image gallery.

14. Cvagoc95

Posts: 19; Member since: Nov 28, 2014

The photos of Note 10.1 2014 Edition are wrong. These are the ones of the original Note 10.1, not the 2014 Edition ! ! !

18. Awalker

Posts: 1977; Member since: Aug 15, 2013

I want Google to release a Nexus 7 2015.

20. MDave

Posts: 210; Member since: Apr 09, 2015

Samsung tablets are laggy. Weak GPUs and heavy Touchwiz is a bad combination. We'll see if they manage to something about it when they release the Tab S2 later this year.

32. alex3run

Posts: 715; Member since: May 18, 2014

Weak GPUs? Dude, what are you smoking?)

33. MDave

Posts: 210; Member since: Apr 09, 2015

Yeah, weak-ass GPUs. Anandtech's review of the Tab S: The bigger problem really seems to be GPU performance. The Exynos 5420 integrates ARM’s Mali-T628MP6 GPU, which just isn’t competitive with Apple’s PowerVR Series 6 implementations. The bigger problem is that the GPU doesn’t seem quite cut out to driving the high resolution display. What, did that hurt your feelings?

36. alex3run

Posts: 715; Member since: May 18, 2014

They did no gaming tests. As usual...

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