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Qualcomm's Snapdragon Glance app for Android lets you see information from the lock screen

Posted: , by Alan F.

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Qualcomm's Snapdragon Glance app for Android lets you see information from the lock screen
We've told you before about Qualcomm's Snapdragon BatteryGuru app which works on Android handsets powered by Snapdragon processors (of course) to extend battery life. We just installed this on an HTC DROID DNA, and while we are still evaluating it, so far we have to say that the app works exactly as advertised. It won't turn your power chomping LTE enabled Android phone into the Motorola DROID MAXX, but we are seeing a rather noticeable improvement in battery life on the phone.

What brings up BatteryGuru is the new app that Qualcomm has for Android users. The Snapdragon Glance app (in Beta) requires you to install BatteryGuru first. That is because the battery saving app learns how you use your phone, and this information helps Snapdragon Glance with its tasks. The latter is actually a Lock Screen information app that launches when you turn your phone's screen on. You could bypass it by hitting the back button, but then you would miss the information that it collects for you, and puts on your lock screen.

The app will show you your next calendar event without having to unlock the handset. Missed calls, text messages and app notifications, they are all here. And based on your past usage, the app will even suggest contacts to call or apps to open. The current weather is also displayed. The only drawback, at least right now, is that the app requires you to be running Android 4.3 or higher. BatteryGuru, on the other hand, works on Snapdragon powered Android phones running 4.0 or higher, so you might want to check out that app until your phone is updated to Android 4.3 or higher.

Screenshots from Snapdragon Glance
Screenshots from Snapdragon Glance
Screenshots from Snapdragon Glance

Screenshots from Snapdragon Glance


source: SnapdragonGlance via IntoMobile

11 Comments
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posted on 10 Feb 2014, 03:35 1

1. TechBizJP08 (Posts: 495; Member since: 25 Mar 2013)


i don't see the reason of having a lock screen. might as well remove it.

as far as security is concerned. a thief can access all of your data while its locked. too bad

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 03:42

2. XperiaOptimusOne (unregistered)


+1 Lock patterns are tedious work.

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 04:41 3

4. xperiaDROID (limited) (Posts: 5577; Member since: 08 Mar 2013)


But where's the +1?

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 05:43

6. ScottSchneider (Posts: 319; Member since: 06 Dec 2011)


U get it though... +1

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 07:36

9. boosook (Posts: 1033; Member since: 19 Nov 2012)


and exactly how? ;)

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 04:00 2

3. PapaSmurf (Posts: 8665; Member since: 14 May 2012)


Eh no thanks. I let people see my phone often, so I don't want them to see the the notifications I get.

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 05:05 2

5. kaikuheadhunterz (Posts: 748; Member since: 18 Jul 2013)


It's weird how there are loads of lockscreens available for Android, but I still haven't found the perfect one. Worst part is I don't know what the perfect lockscreen is (for me, that is)

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 06:56

7. dratomic (Posts: 464; Member since: 09 Oct 2013)


so basically they will turn the lockscreen into another home screen by adding features to it. whats next? making a lock screen for the lock screen?!

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 07:26

8. rodneyej1 (Posts: 3556; Member since: 06 Jul 2013)


WP already has this.

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 10:16

10. dratomic (Posts: 464; Member since: 09 Oct 2013)


no NOKIA has it

posted on 10 Feb 2014, 11:17 1

11. Augustine (Posts: 738; Member since: 28 Sep 2013)


I tried Battery Guru, and was not impressed. While not quite a placebo, I could have achieved almost the same results myself.

This app seems to achieve its results by limiting the background refresh of seldom used apps, at least after it learns which apps are seldom used.. The problem was that it limited the refresh of apps that are important to me, which I do indeed seldom use them, but they monitor important, though infrequent, stuff that I need to know. For example, it deemed a weather alert unimportant, since there had been no alert in the period it was learning about my usage patter, so the "guru" disabled background refresh for it.

Much of the savings came from the app shutting off WiFi, which is fine, enabling it in lieu of data. However, I'd rather not use the WiFi at work unless I really need to. Perhaps it could offer the option to specify which WiFi network it could use to save power.

In conclusion, when I enabled the refresh of important apps and disabled its management of WiFi, this app saved zilch extra battery life compared to before I installed it.

And why, why does it need to read my texts and access my accounts?

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