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Motorola a "longtime love story" for Lenovo, courting reportedly started in 2011

Posted: , by Chris P.

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Lenovo may have well bought themselves Motorola Mobility's devices division in what looked like a lightning quick deal, but the story apparently goes back a few years. According to TechCrunch, Lenovo was among the competitors bidding for Motorola back in 2011, but it obviously lost out to Google's $12.5 billion offer and more attractive brand cache. 

Lenovo chairman and CEO, Yang Yuanqing, is cited in a WSJ report, corroborating the idea that this was long due. Apparently, the executive approached Google's Eric Schmidt after Google acquired Motorola in 2012, expressing Lenovo's continued interest in the symbolic handset maker: 

"I told him if they really want to run a hardware business they could keep it," Mr. Yang told the WSJ. "If they are not interested in the hardware business, they could sell Motorola to us."

It's not at all surprising, then, that the Google chairman was the one to approach the Lenovo chief just before Thanksgiving in 2013, testing the waters. As we now know, Lenovo was obviously still quite interested, especially since rumors have it that it was in unsuccessful talks with BlackBerry not long before that. Mr. Yang was apparently quite enthusiastic, too: "And I said yes", he told the WSJ. "This was a longtime love story." This actually means that Lenovo has been looking for a shortcut to the global market pretty much as early as its smartphone division came into existence. This hopefully means that the Chinese giant is not messing around, and has been preparing for this moment for quite some time now.

But it's not a done deal just yet, at least as far as US regulators are concerned. The deal still needs to be approved, and it is likely to go through the scrutinizing gaze of the US Committee on Foreign Investment, a body that looks at transactions that it considers to entail potential national-security risks. Lenovo is said to be unconcerned, however.

source: WSJ via TechCrunch

16 Comments
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posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:26 4

1. ihavenoname (Posts: 1243; Member since: 18 Aug 2013)


Hopely Motorola keeps that innovative spirit they got from Google. Moto X and G are awesome.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:44 3

5. Tsoliades (Posts: 206; Member since: 22 Dec 2012)


The only tech companies I like are T-Mobile and Motorola. If stupid Lenovo screws them up or slows down updates, I'm seriously going to be angry.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:29

2. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 3213; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


So what was the point of Google buying them in the first place?

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:34 2

4. Droid_X_Doug (Posts: 5527; Member since: 22 Dec 2010)


Ummm. How about the patent portfolio? Also, Team Google probably had an attack of hubris and thought they could re-invent the hardware business.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:44 2

6. IliyaBeshkov (Posts: 240; Member since: 09 Jul 2012)


Patents...

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 10:50 4

7. Antimio (Posts: 125; Member since: 11 Nov 2013)


The real question, my friend is, what was the point of Apple bidding for Nortel and creating the Rockstar Consortium? There's your answer :)

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 11:55

8. corporateJP (Posts: 1515; Member since: 28 Nov 2009)


Ha ha ha...hit him with an analogy he can understand!

Stay thirsty, my friends...

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 09:32 1

3. Droid_X_Doug (Posts: 5527; Member since: 22 Dec 2010)


Lenovo better be concerned with the Committee on Foreign Investment. Moto has a non-trivial supplier relationship with the U.S. government. Either that business will be spun-off or fire-walled, or the deal won't get done.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 12:17 1

10. lsutigers (Posts: 696; Member since: 08 Mar 2009)


Most of the government business was with Motorola Solutions which was spun-off separately from Motorola Mobility. Motorola Mobility was the division Google owned and main whose business was mobile phones.

www.motorolasolutions.com

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 11:56 3

9. corporateJP (Posts: 1515; Member since: 28 Nov 2009)


And in other news, China buys another healthy slice of Americana...

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 12:30

11. marbovo (Posts: 580; Member since: 16 May 2013)


lol, that is really nice... lol

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 13:11

12. domfonusr (Posts: 281; Member since: 17 Jan 2014)


Yep. I have previously heard that Lenovo was looking to become active in the US mobile tech market. Buying Moto is a big boost in those plans, and gets them in the door quicker and more easily.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 17:13 1

13. jiezel91 (Posts: 56; Member since: 28 Jul 2011)


I like this news really. Lenovo produces phones with great build quality and I can attest to that since I currently own a Lenovo P780. Very solid device with very good battery life! Probably, they would merge Lenovo's P Series and Motorola's Maxx series since both series focus on longer battery life.

Anyway, good to see that Lenovo are very determined to be successful.

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 22:38

15. WindowsiDroid (Posts: 105; Member since: 22 Jul 2013)


I also have that phone and it does have better quality than any international phone brand in the same price except Nokia of course.

posted on 31 Jan 2014, 00:18

16. fireblade (Posts: 629; Member since: 27 Dec 2013)


The OS in Lenovo sucks. The update is just a dream like typical random Chinese phones, they will forget the owner of old phones. There are only few available custom ROMs and most of them are crap & flaw. Most of Lenovo phones use mediatek which has poor performance & crappy GPS. I'm done with Chinese phones. (This is a true story from Lenovo user because I'm the owner of a Lenovo phone too)

posted on 30 Jan 2014, 21:11 1

14. TechBlue (Posts: 62; Member since: 06 May 2010)


oh man thats like a Chinese Restaurant serving apple pie

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