First thoughts: iPhone 11, Pro and iPhone Pro Max vs Samsung Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+

First thoughts: iPhone 11, Pro and iPhone Pro Max vs Samsung Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+
It’s insane to think where we’ve arrived in the smartphone world. In their aim to cover as many tastes and a wide variety of budgets, manufacturers have long abandoned the idea of having just The One flagship phone. Instead, they have a few sibling flagships — released at the same time and covering different needs and price ranges.

Just last year, Apple made the ambiguous customer’s life a living hell by releasing a total of 3 iPhones together. Then, Samsung followed suit by dropping three different Galaxy S10 phones (not counting the 5G model and don’t even get me started on the Note 10 series). Now, Apple is bombarding us with three new models yet again and you may be sitting there, wondering “Do I want one of these new iPhones or one of the Galaxy S10 phones?”. Either that or you are here for the unavoidable controversy, which ensues when a high-class Android phone clashes with the iPhone in a piece that’s supposed to be informative, but you know deep down inside that it’s probably riddled with opinions.

In any case — let’s talk about the new iPhones vs the fairly new Galaxies!

Hardware vs hardware, iOS vs One UI


Alright, so it’s always been a bit weird to compare hardware between iPhones and competitors. Apple, obviously, uses its own chips — the Apple A13 Bionic in the case of the iPhone 11 — and they’ve always been stellar in terms of performance. The Galaxy S10 series use a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855, which is also great… not “as” great, but a pretty powerful system-on-chip none the less. We don’t have any benchmarks for Apple’s new phones yet, but here’s how the iPhone XS’s chip compared to the Galaxy S10:

AnTuTu is a multi-layered, comprehensive mobile benchmark app that assesses various aspects of a device, including CPU, GPU, RAM, I/O, and UX performance. A higher score means an overall faster device.

Higher is better
Apple iPhone XS
358091
Samsung Galaxy S10
329546


We don’t know how much RAM the new iPhone pack just yet, but here’s some info from the past. The iPhone XR had 3 GB of RAM, while the iPhone XS and XS Max had 4 GB of RAM. Chances that they would get any big upgrade this year are slim. The Galaxy phones… well, they go big — 8 GB RAM on the starting tiers for all of them.

But here’s the crux of the situation — iOS and Android treat RAM very, very differently. So, it’s kind of hard to compare the raw specs as they are. But that segues perfectly into:

Software



Apple’s phones run on iOS. Of course — the exclusive software experience, which you only get if you have an Apple device. iOS is stable fast and fluid, yet not without its faults. It’s not big on customizability and it’s not really built for multi-tasking. Forget about picture-in-picture, split-screen, or rapidly switching between apps who happen to stay active in the background.

Still, the fact that Apple makes the software and hardware here allows it to squeeze out great performance and give app developers a pretty good platform to make great apps and games for. So, there’s pros and cons — some people love iOS, some hate it, and then there are those who are infinitely torn and always in flux — sometimes they drop it, sometimes they go back to it.

Samsung’s One UI is generously spread on top of Android 9 Pie on the Galaxy S10 series. That means Theme store, icon packs, split screen and PiP, insane customizability and a bucket-load of features. An Android phone is a poweruser’s playground and the Samsung devices just offer you all they can. Again, it’s a love-it-or-hate-it thing.

Let’s take a closer look at the different phones:

Apple iPhone 11 vs Samsung Galaxy S10e

Display

Display size

6.1 inches
5.8 inches

Resolution

828 x 1792 pixels
1080 x 2280 pixels

Aspect Ratio

19.5:9
19:9

Pixel density

324 ppi
438 ppi

Technology

IPS LCD
Dynamic AMOLED

Screen-to-body

80.04 %
83.35 %

Peak brightness

625 cd/m2 (nit)
 

Camera

Rear

Dual camera
Dual camera

Main camera

12 megapixels
12 megapixels

Features

Sapphire crystal lens cover, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus
Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus

Specifications

Aperture size: F1.8; Focal length: 26 mm
Aperture size: F1.5/F2.4; Focal length: 26 mm; Sensor size: 1/2.55"; Pixel size: 1.4 μm

Second camera

12 megapixels
16 megapixels

Features

Ultra-wide, Sapphire crystal lens cover
Ultra-wide

Specifications

Aperture size: F2.4; Focal Length: 13 mm
Aperture size: F2.2; Focal Length: 12 mm; Sensor size: 1/3.1"; Pixel size: 1 μm

Video recording

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD)
3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD) (960 fps)

Features

Optical image stabilization, Time-lapse video, Continuous autofocus, Picture-taking during video recording
High Dynamic Range mode (HDR), Time-lapse video, Hyperlapse, Picture-taking during video recording, Video light, Digital image stabilization, Video calling, Video sharing

Front

12 megapixels
10 megapixels

Video capture

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps)
3840x2160 (4K UHD)

Design

Dimensions

5.94 x 2.98 x 0.33 inches (150.9 x 75.7 x 8.3 mm)
5.60 x 2.75 x 0.31 inches (142.2 x 69.9 x 7.9 mm)

Weight

6.84 oz (194 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)
5.29 oz (150 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)

Materials

Back: Glass; Frame: Aluminum
Back: Glass (Corning Gorilla Glass 5); Frame: Aluminum

Resistance

Water, Dust; IP 68
Water, Dust; IP 68

Biometrics

3D Face unlock
2D Face unlock, Fingerprint (touch)

Hardware & Performance

System chip

Apple A13 Bionic APL1W85
Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

Processor

Hexa-core, 2650 MHz, Lightning and Thunder, 64-bit, 7 nm
Octa-core, 2840 MHz, Kryo 485, 64-bit, 7 nm

GPU

Apple-designed 4 core
Adreno 640

RAM

4 GB LPDDR4
6 GB LPDDR4

Internal storage

64 GB, not expandable
128 GB

OS

iOS (13.x)
Android (9.0 Pie), Samsung One UI

Battery

Capacity

3110 mAh
3100 mAh

Charging

USB Power Delivery
Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0, USB Power Delivery, Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging

Music playback

65.00 hours
 

Video playback

17.00 hours
19.00 hours


Obviously, these two will be compared fairly regularly. Not because they are incredibly similar but because they are the “cheapest option” in their respective group. However, they are very different beasts.

For example, the iPhone 11 is not the smallest iPhone you can buy — it sits between the iPhone Pro and iPhone Pro Max in terms of size, with a nice 6.1-inch screen, which is both comfortable and not way-too-huge. The Galaxy S10e, on the other hand, is Samsung’s compact flagship — it’s so small it’s cute and it’s so light you will love how easily pocketable it is (I am not implying you try to steal one, by the way).

Apple iPhone 11

Apple iPhone 11

Dimensions

5.94 x 2.98 x 0.33 inches

150.9 x 75.7 x 8.3 mm

Weight

6.84 oz (194 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10e

Samsung Galaxy S10e

Dimensions

5.6 x 2.75 x 0.31 inches

142.2 x 69.9 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.29 oz (150 g)

Apple iPhone 11

Apple iPhone 11

Dimensions

5.94 x 2.98 x 0.33 inches

150.9 x 75.7 x 8.3 mm

Weight

6.84 oz (194 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10e

Samsung Galaxy S10e

Dimensions

5.6 x 2.75 x 0.31 inches

142.2 x 69.9 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.29 oz (150 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page


In terms of screen quality — it’s an easy thing to call. The Galaxy S10e uses Samsung’s top-tier Super AMOLED panel, while the iPhone 11 has an LCD screen. And yes, Apple’s LCD is outstanding in terms of detail, color-reproduction, and viewing angles… but Samsung’s Super AMOLED is just amazing. The little S10e crams more pixels in its smaller display and it looks so, so sharp! The iPhone 11 will, presumably, have the very same screen like the iPhone XR. And previous experience tells us that it’s very good… but not extraordinary.

There is also the very different manner of how you unlock the devices — the Galaxy S10e has a fingerprint scanner embedded into its power button on the side while the iPhone 11 uses Apple’s Face ID, same as its more expensive brethren. Which one is more comfortable? It has to be Face ID, really — while it may have its quirks on rare occasions, it is generally very reliable and there’s nothing like having your phone unlock the instant you look at it. To top it off, Apple touted that it’s now upgraded and can detect your face at wider angles, which we are impatient to test!



The Galaxy S10e’s side-mounted fingerprint scanner is fast and accurate, but not as comfortable to use. Consider this — if the device is on a mount or lying on a table, you’d almost always need to fidget with it, pick it up, or at least move it to hit that scanning sweet spot. This is why in-display fingerprint scanners are so highly-coveted — you can simply touch the front of your device to unlock it.



In the camera department, we have direct competition. Both phones are outfitted with a regular wide-angle and an ultra-wide-angle camera. They are fairly close in specs — the iPhone 11 has 12 MP sensors under both lenses, while the S10e has a 12 MP main sensor and a 16 MP one for the ultra-wide camera. The S10e also has slightly wider apertures on both sensors to provide a shallower depth of field and let more light in.

Really, we can look at the specs on paper all we like, but we will have to wait to get our hands on an iPhone 11 for this one. Apple talked a lot about camera improvements, but we all know that Samsung’s flagships are no slouches in the camera department as well. Needless to say, both phones will have great cameras… Which one is better? To be continued…

Apple iPhone 11 Pro vs Samsung Galaxy S10

Display

Display size

5.8 inches
6.1 inches

Resolution

1125 x 2436 pixels
1440 x 3040 pixels

Aspect Ratio

19.5:9
19:9

Pixel density

463 ppi
550 ppi

Technology

OLED
Dynamic AMOLED

Screen-to-body

80.37 %
88.66 %

Peak brightness

800 cd/m2 (nit)
 

Camera

Rear

Triple camera
Triple camera

Main camera

12 megapixels
12 megapixels

Features

Sapphire crystal lens cover, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus
Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus

Specifications

Aperture size: F1.8; Focal length: 26 mm
Aperture size: F1.5/F2.4; Focal length: 26 mm; Sensor size: 1/2.55"; Pixel size: 1.4 μm

Second camera

12 megapixels
12 megapixels

Features

Telephoto, Sapphire crystal lens cover, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus
Telephoto, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus

Specifications

Optical zoom: 2x; Aperture size: F2.0; Focal Length: 52 mm
Optical zoom: 2x; Aperture size: F2.4; Focal Length: 52 mm; Sensor size: 1/3.6"; Pixel size: 1 μm

Third camera

12 megapixels
16 megapixels

Features

Ultra-wide
Ultra-wide

Specifications

Aperture size: F2.4; Focal Length: 13 mm
Aperture size: F2.2; Focal Length: 12 mm; Sensor size: 1/3.1"; Pixel size: 1 μm

Video recording

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD)
3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD) (960 fps)

Features

Optical image stabilization, Time-lapse video, Continuous autofocus, Picture-taking during video recording
High Dynamic Range mode (HDR), Time-lapse video, Hyperlapse, Picture-taking during video recording, Video light, Digital image stabilization, Video calling, Video sharing

Front

12 megapixels
10 megapixels

Video capture

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps)
3840x2160 (4K UHD)

Design

Dimensions

5.67 x 2.81 x 0.32 inches (144 x 71.4 x 8.1 mm)
5.90 x 2.77 x 0.31 inches (149.9 x 70.4 x 7.8 mm)

Weight

6.63 oz (188 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)
5.54 oz (157 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)

Materials

Back: Glass; Frame: Stainless steel
Back: Glass (Corning Gorilla Glass 5); Frame: Aluminum

Resistance

Water, Dust; IP 68
Water, Dust; IP 68

Biometrics

3D Face unlock
2D Face unlock, In-screen fingerprint

Hardware & Performance

System chip

Apple A13 Bionic APL1W85
Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

Processor

Hexa-core, 2650 MHz, Lightning and Thunder, 64-bit, 7 nm
Octa-core, 2840 MHz, Kryo 485, 64-bit, 7 nm

GPU

Apple-designed 4 core
Adreno 640

RAM

4 GB LPDDR4
8 GB LPDDR4

Internal storage

64 GB, not expandable
128 GB

OS

iOS (13.x)
Android (9.0 Pie), Samsung One UI

Battery

Capacity

3046 mAh
3400 mAh

Charging

USB Power Delivery
Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0, USB Power Delivery, Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging

Music playback

65.00 hours
 

Video playback

18.00 hours
20.00 hours

Moving on to “actual flagship” land. These devices represent their respective lines best — they pack the full technological punch, no corners were cut, no features were omitted (*ahem* not counting the Galaxy S10 5G’s ToF camera). Interestingly enough, we see a slight role-reversal here — the Samsung phone is bigger than the Apple phone, as opposed to the previous category.

But not uncomfortably big… the Galaxy S10 is incredibly thin and light and just a joy to hold and use. Its 6.1-inch screen sits at that threshold of being large enough to enjoy media on, while not crossing into gargantuan land. It’s on the verge of being called a “big phone” but somehow manages to escape that category with its ergonomic design. Its fingerprint scanner is on the front — an ultrasonic scanner hidden under the display in that comfortable position.

The iPhone 11 Pro is almost the same size as the iPhone XS. It’s very, very slightly bigger and thicker, but we are talking halves of millimeters here. So, judging by previous experience, the iPhone 11 Pro is that super-pocketable, comfy-to-hold, one-hand-use iPhone. It’s not exactly a multimedia machine with that 5.8-inch screen, and it’s not the best for two-thumb-texting if you have bigger hands. Also, don’t worry, this one has an OLED panel now, which is gorgeous. It’s essentially the most powerful iPhone, squished into a fairly compact shell.

Apple iPhone XS

Apple iPhone XS

Dimensions

5.65 x 2.79 x 0.3 inches

143.6 x 70.9 x 7.7 mm

Weight

6.24 oz (177 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10

Dimensions

5.9 x 2.77 x 0.31 inches

149.9 x 70.4 x 7.8 mm

Weight

5.54 oz (157 g)

Apple iPhone XS

Apple iPhone XS

Dimensions

5.65 x 2.79 x 0.3 inches

143.6 x 70.9 x 7.7 mm

Weight

6.24 oz (177 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10

Dimensions

5.9 x 2.77 x 0.31 inches

149.9 x 70.4 x 7.8 mm

Weight

5.54 oz (157 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page


In the camera department, we have the same setup on both devices — ultra-wide-angle, wide-angle, and telephoto cameras all around. And, as stated earlier, we can’t say which one is “better” before we get to compare both phones directly. Needless to say, both will be great performers. Now, we have some different modes — the Galaxy S10 does have that Super Slow-mo… bu-u-ut, it seems that Apple has opened up the iPhone 11 Pro’s triple camera API for developers to accomplish amazing things. On stage, the makers of popular camera app Filmic showed how they can use the iPhone 11 Pro to record a video using all of the phone’s cameras simultaneously. Let me repeat — recording video from the wide-angle, telephoto, ultra-wide-angle, and selfie camera all at the same time.

This is powerful, to say the least, and is probably just the beginning of yet another age of crazy new camera apps coming out exclusively for the iPhone. iOS 13 is now also getting a native video editor, which is cool, although iOS had pretty good ones already provided by 3rd party developers on the App Store. Samsung’s Galaxy S10 is just now gaining up in that particular field thangs to Adobe’s Premiere Rush finally being available for Android. And it still doesn’t offer vital features, such as keyframes — something that iOS apps have.

In other words, image quality is one thing. But what you can do with said images on each platform is another… and iOS has been in the lead here for a while. Just saying.

Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max vs Samsung Galaxy S10+

Display

Display size

6.5 inches
6.4 inches

Resolution

1242 x 2688 pixels
1440 x 3040 pixels

Aspect Ratio

19.5:9
19:9

Pixel density

456 ppi
522 ppi

Technology

OLED
Dynamic AMOLED

Screen-to-body

84.52 %
88.63 %

Peak brightness

800 cd/m2 (nit)
 

Camera

Rear

Triple camera
Triple camera

Main camera

12 megapixels
12 megapixels

Features

Sapphire crystal lens cover, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus
Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus

Specifications

Aperture size: F1.8; Focal length: 26 mm
Aperture size: F1.5/F2.4; Focal length: 26 mm; Sensor size: 1/2.55"; Pixel size: 1.4 μm

Second camera

12 megapixels
12 megapixels

Features

Telephoto, Sapphire crystal lens cover, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus
Telephoto, Optical image stabilization, Phase detection autofocus

Specifications

Optical zoom: 2x; Aperture size: F2.0; Focal Length: 52 mm
Optical zoom: 2x; Aperture size: F2.4; Focal Length: 52 mm; Sensor size: 1/3.6"; Pixel size: 1 μm

Third camera

12 megapixels
16 megapixels

Features

Ultra-wide, Sapphire crystal lens cover
Ultra-wide

Specifications

Aperture size: F2.4; Focal Length: 13 mm
Aperture size: F2.2; Focal Length: 12 mm; Sensor size: 1/3.1"; Pixel size: 1 μm

Video recording

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD)
3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps), 1920x1080 (Full HD) (240 fps), 1280x720 (HD) (960 fps)

Features

Optical image stabilization, Time-lapse video, Continuous autofocus, Picture-taking during video recording
High Dynamic Range mode (HDR), Time-lapse video, Hyperlapse, Digital image stabilization, Video calling, Video sharing

Front

12 megapixels
10 megapixels

Video capture

3840x2160 (4K UHD) (60 fps)
3840x2160 (4K UHD)

Design

Dimensions

6.22 x 3.06 x 0.32 inches (158 x 77.8 x 8.1 mm)
6.20 x 2.92 x 0.31 inches (157.6 x 74.1 x 7.8 mm)

Weight

7.97 oz (226 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)
6.17 oz (175 g)
the average is 6.1 oz (173 g)

Materials

Back: Glass; Frame: Stainless steel
Back: Glass (Corning Gorilla Glass 5); Frame: Aluminum

Resistance

Water, Dust; IP 68
Water, Dust; IP 68

Biometrics

3D Face unlock
2D Face unlock, In-screen fingerprint

Hardware & Performance

System chip

Apple A13 Bionic APL1W85
Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

Processor

Hexa-core, 2650 MHz, Lightning and Thunder, 64-bit, 7 nm
Octa-core, 2800 MHz, Kryo 485, 64-bit, 7 nm

GPU

Apple-designed 4 core
Adreno 640

RAM

4 GB LPDDR4
8 GB LPDDR4

Internal storage

64 GB, not expandable
128 GB

OS

iOS (13.x)
Android (9.0 Pie), Samsung One UI

Battery

Capacity

3969 mAh
4100 mAh

Charging

USB Power Delivery
Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0, USB Power Delivery, Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging

Music playback

80.00 hours
 

Video playback

20.00 hours
22.00 hours


Well, this iPhone definitely wins the “longest name ever” award. That aside, how does it compare to the Big Galaxy?

They are incredibly close, actually. In terms of dimensions, they are very comparable, with the iPhone 11 Pro Max being slightly wider. But do you know where the iPhone definitely, undoubtedly loses? It is so heavy!

The iPhone 11 Pro Max is listed as weighing 228 grams. That’s 18 grams more than last year’s iPhone XS Max and a whopping 51 grams more than the Galaxy S10+. And 50 g may not sound like a lot on paper, but it actually is — especially when handling your 6.5-inch, glass phone.

Apple iPhone XS Max

Apple iPhone XS Max

Dimensions

6.2 x 3.05 x 0.3 inches

157.5 x 77.4 x 7.7 mm

Weight

7.34 oz (208 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10+

Samsung Galaxy S10+

Dimensions

6.2 x 2.92 x 0.31 inches

157.6 x 74.1 x 7.8 mm

Weight

6.17 oz (175 g)

Apple iPhone XS Max

Apple iPhone XS Max

Dimensions

6.2 x 3.05 x 0.3 inches

157.5 x 77.4 x 7.7 mm

Weight

7.34 oz (208 g)

Samsung Galaxy S10+

Samsung Galaxy S10+

Dimensions

6.2 x 2.92 x 0.31 inches

157.6 x 74.1 x 7.8 mm

Weight

6.17 oz (175 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page


In other words, in terms of ergonomics, the Galaxy S10+ nails it here, as it’s thin, light, and a pleasure to hold. Last year’s iPhone XS Max was already a bit meaty, the iPhone 11 Pro Max will definitely be a challenge to use without a case.

In terms of camera? See above… verdict is still out. No doubt the iPhone 11 Pro Max will take some awesome photos, but we don’t know if they will be better than the Galaxy S10+ yet. What we do know is that external video-editing apps are better… and that’s kind of sad.

Expectations


We still need to get our hands on some iPhone 11 units, take them out to the streets and compare them to the Galaxies in daily routines. But iOS is iOS and the iPhone experience has been pretty solid and predictable year after year. Apple promised some insane battery life boosts, which we are eager to see — the iPhone 11 Pro Max was touted to be able to last 5 hours more than an iPhone XS Max. Pretty big commitment there! But if it turns out to be true, Samsung will be in trouble.

Then, there’s The Ecosystem argument. See, Apple doesn’t just sell you the iPhone. It’s selling you a part of a bigger puzzle — the Apple ecosystem puzzle. MacBooks, iMacs, the Apple Watch, the HomePod, the awesome AirPods, and — of course — services, such as Apple Music, TV+, and Apple Arcade. An established spiderweb of great products, which happen to play off of one another seamlessly. Samsung is still a bit behind on that aspect, but if you are dead-set on staying away from Apple’s Walled Garden, fret not — there’s hope for you! Samsung’s own Galaxy Watch series is probably the best watch to get on the Android side (technically, they run Tizen), the Galaxy Buds are pretty good, and it’s awesome that you can charge them wirelessly with your Galaxy phone. Sammy has been building towards a partnership with Microsoft and the end result is integration between One UI and Windows, which allows screen mirroring and the upcoming PlayGalaxy Link for game streaming. And Samsung does have its own plethora of household items that can connect through your Galaxy.

So, in other words, while both series of phones are pretty great… this battle extends to more than just them. Each choice makes a bunch of other products available to you, which further complicates the choice. Which ecosystem would you invest in?

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56 Comments

1. cheetah2k

Posts: 2288; Member since: Jan 16, 2011

So the new iphones lack 5G options, still base 64gb Storage (wtf!) and no UFS 3.0, no 90/120hz screens.. After seeing all the 2019 phones so far this year, the Apple notch is totally hideous! For the money, I have no doubts the Oneplus 7 Pro is the better value handset...

4. sgodsell

Posts: 7514; Member since: Mar 16, 2013

The S10+ has two front facing cameras. Which Phonearena didn't mention it's depth sensor camera.

6. Phullofphil

Posts: 1828; Member since: Feb 10, 2009

Oops move on

9. ramdroid

Posts: 138; Member since: May 21, 2016

Hard to say that with the crazy low price for s10 at the moment. Plus asus rog has 120hz, UFS 3.0, better in every way hardware wise and for 500$ !!!

12. midan

Posts: 3097; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

Apple doesn't use UFS. Apple storage is already super fast. Typical android user, looking one spec and makes his conclusion. For example one site just did speed comparison by converting long video with note 10 (UFS 3.0) and XS Max. With iPhone it took 40s and with note 10 1 m 20 s. There's your UFS ;)

34. worldpeace

Posts: 3135; Member since: Apr 15, 2016

So.. What is that "one site" that did that test.. Since in every speedtest I know, any SD855 powered smartphone BEAT XS Max in video encoding test. note10 vs XS Max speed test that I've just check, and Note10 beat XS Max. Phonebuff youtu.be/tqxA222ljFc XEETECHCARE youtu.be/gfWVLwRv6LU

41. Vancetastic

Posts: 1698; Member since: May 17, 2017

Translation: "WAHHHH!! HIM NO LIKE IPHONE MORE BETTER!!!". It's just the internet, and opinions. Jeez.

22. QuantumRazer

Posts: 153; Member since: Apr 27, 2019

On iPhone Apple uses their own NVMe storage which is already ridiculously fast on its own. And as for the high refresh rate OLED display, I think Apple is waiting for the technology to mature, just like Samsung held back and used the conventional 60Hz display on Note 10 series.

30. dimas

Posts: 3394; Member since: Jul 22, 2014

And here I am, waiting to get my hands on galaxy a90 5g for a lower price.

2. JCASS889

Posts: 594; Member since: May 18, 2018

I like how you guys put sapphire crystal lens when it been proven to scratch just as easily as regular glass. Gotta make the iPhone sound fancy huh?

3. Fred3

Posts: 574; Member since: Jan 16, 2018

As I was reading it I was trying to figure out why would it be considered as a feature

7. Phullofphil

Posts: 1828; Member since: Feb 10, 2009

Oh yeah. Mine has not. But that being said it did not claim either way. That’s a selling point though and Samsung’s phone does not have it.

11. almostdone

Posts: 449; Member since: Sep 25, 2012

Real sapphire is more resistant but Apple uses regular glass with 1% infused sapphire and claim it's sapphire.. Apple will market any crap to the sheeps and they will believe it.

14. midan

Posts: 3097; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

iPhone camera lens is very durable, i owned 4 iPhones and use them average 2-3 years and ll of them camera lens looks like brand new while the phone itself doesn't.

16. wickedwilly

Posts: 740; Member since: Sep 19, 2018

Just because you have not got any scratches does not mean it is pure saphire glass. I have seen these tested and the glass scratches at a level below that of proper saphire glass. Just like Apple says the glass used on the screen and body of an iPhone is the strongest glass on any phone it is all marketing bullshxxxt.

29. midan

Posts: 3097; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

I don't know if it's proper sapphire or not, but the fact is that it's lot more durable than regular glass on the iPhone or any smartphone. Everyone here who owns iPhone can look their camera lens and i would say those look just like new. Because i have never even used case with any of my iOS devices and yet camera lens is always perfect condition while the devices itself shows marks from years usage.

40. wickedwilly

Posts: 740; Member since: Sep 19, 2018

It is not proper Saphire and it gives you no more protection than other comparable phones. It scratches at a level 6 on Mohs Scale the same as glass used on its peers. If you think you can look at your lense and feel better because Apple tells you its Saphire, you a very gullible.

25. mackan84

Posts: 609; Member since: Feb 13, 2014

Welcome to the smartphone-business. Haven’t they all market ai with marketing mumbo jumbo. Computational photography, screens, camera set ups. They all have fancy names for their latest gimmick and that’s what you see on display in the store. Yes Apple is probably the founding father of this but the rest of them ain’t no better.

13. midan

Posts: 3097; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

This here is pure crap! I have never had any scratch on any of my iPhone camera lens. While the phone itself has very tiny scratches there and there the camera lens looks perfect after years. It's not same and it doesn't scratch as easily. Especially now with the camera bump you would then expect the camera lens part look by far worst after use, right?

42. Vancetastic

Posts: 1698; Member since: May 17, 2017

It's what they call it. Why be upset?

5. wickedwilly

Posts: 740; Member since: Sep 19, 2018

Why is the IPhone 11 biometrics more comfortable? It is slower than the S10e version, more secure yes but then you can use the more secure FPS on the Samsung. As for using it on the table, you have to lean over the get the fact in the correct position then swipe. On the 10 e just look at the phone, remember it has two options a far better solution. When holding there is no competition the FPS or face scanner is easier to use than Face ID. Add in all the other user scenarios and the Samsungs biometrics are far more convenient and flexible and no need for a butt ugly notch that takes away valuable screen estate.

8. Phullofphil

Posts: 1828; Member since: Feb 10, 2009

I don’t know my s max works great and is easy for me. I like my iPhone. I don’t mind the “notch” buy what you want. There both nice phones you bunch of crybabies

17. wickedwilly

Posts: 740; Member since: Sep 19, 2018

I am talking about whether they are "nice phones" or not. I am disputing the point the author claimed the IP11 biometrics are more comfortable. Both FPS and face readers have their own benefits and weaknesses, so having both is clearly the best option. This is not crying, it is pointing out the error in the article. The ones that are crying are those trying to defend yet another mediocre update.

31. midan

Posts: 3097; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

"As for using it on the table, you have to lean over the get the fact in the correct position then swipe." iPhone 11 face ID works from greater angles, propably no leaning anymore. Also you don't need to wait to swipe, you can swipe before you use face ID.

43. Vancetastic

Posts: 1698; Member since: May 17, 2017

I've used faceid a lot, and you're making it sound way worse than it is. I, too, prefer a fingerprint unlock, but faceid is pretty solid, and quite easy to use.

10. drflint4u

Posts: 20; Member since: Mar 01, 2015

I stopped reading when he said face id is more convenient than s10e side fp. Like can you unlock the iPhone from your Jacket's pocket?

21. gadgetpower

Posts: 283; Member since: Aug 23, 2019

Can you unlock your phone without touching it?

26. bouraak

Posts: 4; Member since: Sep 11, 2019

Of course, by Bixby ^^

44. Vancetastic

Posts: 1698; Member since: May 17, 2017

Can you? No. Still gotta swipe up, genius.

23. QuantumRazer

Posts: 153; Member since: Apr 27, 2019

What about when you want to unlock your phone when it's placed on a table? Side facing FPS forces you to pick up your phone with rather awkward finger positions, with Face ID you just need to look at the display.

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