Verizon's leftovers after consuming Alltel are now in the hands of AT&T

Verizon's leftovers after consuming Alltel are now in the hands of AT&T
After Verizon Wireless completed its acquisition of Alltel, there were some obvious leftovers seen after the whole process made Verizon become the largest carrier in the country – dropping AT&T down to the runner-up position. Although it may have been viewed as a blow to AT&T, it looks like the carrier is picking up the pieces left after the incident. Both Verizon and AT&T have finally come to a decision in completing a $2.35 billion deal for the transfer of Verizon assets in 79 service areas across 18 states. Essentially it looks like AT&T will be making out good on their part as the carrier's presence will become more prominent in mostly rural locations thanks to some former Alltel properties plus assets from both Rural Cellular Corp and Verizon. Now AT&T is in the process of performing some network transition work to enable 1.6 million subscribers to experience the joys (we hope) of AT&T's mighty 3G mobile broadband network. AT&T Mobility CEO and president, Ralph de la Vega said, “We’re excited that with this acquisition, AT&T will bring the benefits of mobile broadband to new subscribers. We mobilize everything for our customers by delivering the best 3G experience, the fastest 3G speeds nationwide, the most popular smartphones, an array of emerging devices like eReaders and netbooks, the ability to talk and browse the Web at the same time and access to more than 225,000 apps.”

source: Business Wire

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18 Comments

1. omarc26

Posts: 360; Member since: Dec 05, 2009

does this mean at&t will improve coverage in places were there is no at&t coverage like the grand canyon? when i went there only verizon worked there... t-mobile ,sprint n at&t didnt get any service only verizon ..

2. E.N.

Posts: 2610; Member since: Jan 25, 2009

I don't think that covering the Grand Canyon is on top of AT&T's list

8. omarc26

Posts: 360; Member since: Dec 05, 2009

well i think it wud be good if they did put at&t coverage in the grand canyon becuz imagine if u get lost or something n u have at&t u cannot call anyone for help becuz i have at&t and when u have no service u cannot call 911 its impossible

10. upublications

Posts: 2; Member since: Jun 23, 2010

If Verizon has service there, Sprint does too. You know, They kinda have a nationwide roaming agreement.

16. pingpong

Posts: 145; Member since: Mar 28, 2010

How many people get lost in the Grand Canyon enough for this to be a financial benefit to adding millions of dollars worth of towers to that area? lol

3. BlackberryUser

Posts: 609; Member since: Jun 26, 2009

So this means that AT&T is taking over the remaining portions of Alltel? AT&T will still have to invest in the hardware for its new areas.

4. elandrumiii

Posts: 109; Member since: Mar 20, 2010

Some of those areas out west for Alltel are already GSM

5. BlackberryUser

Posts: 609; Member since: Jun 26, 2009

Really? How did that work, I didn't have a GSM radio in my alltel phone?

11. majicc07

Posts: 28; Member since: May 07, 2009

They had a gsm network from when they bought Western Wireless. They only used it to gain roaming revenue which was a very smart idea. All in all Alltel might not have been the largest company but they sure knew how to make money and stay afloat way longer in a merger happy era than anyone thought they would. This new property will be a huge bonus for at&t and give them a larger rural presence: which now a days is really the only place left to gain subscribers..

15. WirelessCon

Posts: 311; Member since: May 11, 2010

The hardware is already in the towers, basically just shut it down, reboot and GSM takes over. There maybe some slight changes for data backhaul, but the hardware is in place. AT&T could everything converted to GSM in a month if they wanted.

6. lovebuzz

Posts: 76; Member since: Oct 21, 2009

I love that they used the word "leftovers". That's the only way AT&T can even get coverage. Like a vulture.

9. networkdood

Posts: 6330; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

Actually, this a FCC mandated sale that VERIZOn had to abide to as this will open up new areas of coverage for AT&T in many rural areas - like minnesota, WYOMING, etc.

7. bossmann20

Posts: 38; Member since: Mar 23, 2010

at&t coverage still sucks compared to sprint and verizon hands down!!!!!

12. networkdood

Posts: 6330; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

Not for me - maybe if you live in a hospital or the gGRAND CANYOn :-)

13. networkdood

Posts: 6330; Member since: Mar 31, 2010

Here is a better article for FIERCEWIRELESS.com on this subject - no wonder PHONEARENA is searching for a new U.S. EDITOR - I would be happy to do the job for 120,00 a year: The FCC approved AT&T's (NYSE:T) $2.35 billion purchase of former Alltel assets that Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) was required to divest, bringing to a close a transaction first announced in May 2009. In unanimously approving the deal--essentially an asset swap between the two mammoth wireless carriers--the five-member commission said the voluntary conditions proposed by AT&T for the deal are "likely to result in transaction-specific public interest benefits." Most of the conditions involve deals with smaller operators and roaming agreements. AT&T Mobility will net 1.6 million new subscribers in 79 service areas spread across 18 states. Most of the assets are from the former Alltel properties Verizon was required to divest due to its blockbuster $28.1 billion acquisition of Alltel that closed in January 2009. Also as part of the transaction, Verizon will get around 120,000 subscribers in five service areas in Louisiana and Mississippi that AT&T was required to divest as a condition of its $944 million acquisition of Centennial Communications, announced in late 2008. AT&T said that over the next 12 months it will launch service on a market-by-market basis across the new territory as it converts the CDMA properties to GSM. The carrier said that, for now, there will be no changes to customers' phone numbers, rate plans, network coverage, customer service contacts or bill payments. AT&T said that during the network integration, customers will be able to get a devices comparable to their existing device at no additional cost.

14. WirelessCon

Posts: 311; Member since: May 11, 2010

This is a huge acquisition for AT&T there's a lot of excitement in those 18 states, lots of rural coverage which means lots of government grants to expand and upgrade. Most of the Alltel towers are CDMA/GSM; to convert to GSM is not as easy as pushing a button, but it's pretty easy. The process is going to take 12 months and that's more for customer conversion strategies than the actual switch to GSM. AT&T also inherits the same data backhaul agreements; put that on top of AT&T's pre-existing wired network in those regions and the data backhaul, in theory, should be very efficient.

17. corporateJP

Posts: 2458; Member since: Nov 28, 2009

"... of AT&T's mighty 3G mobile broadband network. AT&T Mobility CEO and president, Ralph de la Vega said, “We’re excited that with this acquisition, AT&T will bring the benefits of mobile broadband to new subscribers. We mobilize everything for our customers by delivering the best 3G experience..." That entire part of the excerpt is a joke. These clowns don't run 3G anywhere outside of metro areas. AT&T have always been liers and scammers, that's why I bounced mid-contract. Keep spewing those lies, boys.

18. cellgeek82

Posts: 518; Member since: Dec 20, 2009

Those poor former Alltel users, going to get an even crappier network! Have fun with your dropped calls and spotty network coverage. AT&T: Rethink Impossible

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