European group finds a way to get around the Touch ID on Apple iPhone 5s

European group finds a way to get around the Touch ID on Apple iPhone 5s
Saying that the hardest part about hacking the Touch ID fingerprint sensor on the Apple iPhone 5s was finding an iPhone 5s to use, the Chaos Computer Club has found a way to circumvent the new fingerprint sensor on the latest full-featured iPhone. The process requires someone to take a picture of a person's fingerprints at 2400 DPI and then print it at 1200 DPI. The image is used to make a latex sheet that is used to trick the Touch ID sensor.

The bottom line is not to count on the Touch ID sensor to protect your more important information such as the number of your secret Swiss bank account. Granted, this is not a quick 1-2-3 process, but on the other hand there are not enough hurdles to prevent someone from doing it. The actual process dates back to 2004 showing you how elementary it is to fool the Touch ID sensor on the Apple iPhone 5s.




source: ChaosComputerClub via Engadget

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iPhone 5s
  • Display 4.0" 640 x 1136 pixels
  • Camera 8 MP / 1.2 MP front
  • Processor Apple A7, Dual-core, 1300 MHz
  • Storage 64 GB
  • Battery 1570 mAh(10h 3G talk time)

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23 Comments

1. DukeX

Posts: 327; Member since: Aug 28, 2013

As i predicted. Thought of this earlier this week. Just not as intricate. A mistake on my part.

6. androiphone20

Posts: 1654; Member since: Jul 10, 2013

Is there a complete video from beginning to end? Without seeing the steps involved it's kinda pointless. Anything can be hacked. It's whether the time and effort to perform the hack are worth the end result (getting access to a phone). Creating a fake finger to open a safe or get access to a secure area might be worthwhile. I really doubt anyone would go through the effort to get the data that's on your phone.

23. jaychildz

Posts: 144; Member since: May 31, 2013

Crazy thing is, you can reset any iPhone/AndroidPhone without unlocking it so it's in a sense...your phone now!

7. androiphone20

Posts: 1654; Member since: Jul 10, 2013

Is there a complete video from beginning to end? Without seeing the steps involved it's kinda pointless. Anything can be hacked. It's whether the time and effort to perform the hack are worth the end result (getting access to a phone). Creating a fake finger to open a safe or get access to a secure area might be worthwhile. I really doubt anyone would go through the effort to get the data that's on your phone.

8. androiphone20

Posts: 1654; Member since: Jul 10, 2013

Is there a complete video from beginning to end? Without seeing the steps involved it's kinda pointless. Anything can be hacked. It's whether the time and effort to perform the hack are worth the end result (getting access to a phone). Creating a fake finger to open a safe or get access to a secure area might be worthwhile. I really doubt anyone would go through the effort to get the data that's on your phone.

10. androiphone20

Posts: 1654; Member since: Jul 10, 2013

Hmmm, This seems to be fake. Apple have already explained that the Touch ID cannot be fooled by a 2-D image because the sub-epidermal image it creates is 3-D not 2-D. Yet these Germans are claiming that a 2-D image on a thin transparent film fooled the Touch ID sensor Also Apple say the Touch ID sensor cannot be fooled by a dead fingerprint because it will only read the sub- epidermal layers of a live finger. SO HOW DID THEY FAKE IT? It looks very simple. Notice how the same finger used teach Touch ID the fingerprint was then used to pick up a thin transparent film and put it on the sensor WITH THE LIVE FINGER on top of the thin transparent layer.. It seems then that the Touch ID sensor, which uses capacitors and RF to see through the dead skin of a fingerprint to read the sub-epidermal layers to create the 3-D image, then looked THROUGH the thin transparent film at the SAME LIVE FINGERPRINT used to teach Touch ID the fingerprint pattern. In other words it was not reading the transparent film at all, but the real fingerprint touching the transparent film Let's see if I'm right. If I am how many millions of dollars do I get....LOL Any comments

11. hoekone

Posts: 9; Member since: Sep 22, 2013

You sure put a lot of trust into what Apple says, you know they could be lying to you? most companies do. And no they didnt use the same finger, they scanned the index finger then used the middle finger, watch it again.

14. Andrewtst

Posts: 696; Member since: Jan 25, 2009

You can trust whatever company said? Come on! Don't too easier trusting people!

19. DukeX

Posts: 327; Member since: Aug 28, 2013

The latex is probably forms around the scanner to fool it to make it appear 3d

2. Long1

Posts: 399; Member since: May 18, 2013

" Granted, this is not a quick 1-2-3 process" Yes, it is: http://i.imgur.com/thPcXxK.jpg If it worths

22. reckless562

Posts: 1153; Member since: Sep 09, 2013

LOOOOOLLLLL!!!!!!!

3. Nathan_ingx

Posts: 4766; Member since: Mar 07, 2012

Nothing...i mean nothing, is ever so secure, anymore. They'll build a retina scanner into your phone and that will still be hacked by someone.

12. VZWuser76

Posts: 4974; Member since: Mar 04, 2010

Hawkeye and Loki did it in The Avengers, albeit gruesomely.

21. reckless562

Posts: 1153; Member since: Sep 09, 2013

lols... nerd :D

4. stealthd unregistered

I like how they refer to doing a 2400 dpi scan of someone'se fingerprint as something you can do with everyday materials. TouchID is more about convenience. It is more secure than a 4 digit passcode (or no passcode). You still can't wipe the phone or turn off TouchID with just a fingerprint. The effort it takes here is still impractical for purposes of everyday theft. Unless there are state secrets on your phone I wouldn't worry about this (yet).

5. Credo

Posts: 749; Member since: Apr 19, 2012

lollllllllllll

9. GeekyGene

Posts: 88; Member since: Aug 25, 2013

"The process requires someone to take a picture of a person's fingerprints at 2400 DPI" Ok....

13. CX3NT3_713

Posts: 2347; Member since: Apr 18, 2011

Buhuhahhahahaaaaaaaa .. @tim Crook

15. Sniggly

Posts: 7305; Member since: Dec 05, 2009

You know, another user on here once mentioned that a possible reason, or at least a factor, in Motorola's decision not to continue with fingerprint sensors was because they could be fooled like this. At the time I couldn't find any material on it but now it might be time to admit I was wrong. (other factors would have been cost, limitations on design permutations that would allow for a scanner, and low consumer interest.)

16. xnview

Posts: 1; Member since: Sep 23, 2013

And how often do you get a 2400 DPI scan of your fingerprints? And how many of those scans are made by criminals? I'll still say the fingerprint sensor is the safest lock on a phone these days

17. Googler

Posts: 813; Member since: Jun 10, 2013

Quote in the article sums it up perfectly. If it's used to log into accounts more quickly, it still has a useful purpose, but deterring someone from stealing your phone isn't likely to happen.

18. nbringer

Posts: 180; Member since: Sep 11, 2012

I saw it on TV this morning, they bypassed the fingerprint scanner with a cat's paw... pathetic Apple...

20. good2great

Posts: 1042; Member since: Feb 22, 2012

the hell his hands shaking so much???

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