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Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
The first generation Super AMOLED displays, as found on the Samsung Galaxy S, used a then new matrix arrangement called PenTile, which allowed for high resolutions on the tricky to manufacture OLED displays. For various reasons it degraded visibility in certain conditions, compared to the traditional RGB matrix. 

Since then many smaprthones, and even tablets, started using the PenTile matrix, in both AMOLED and LCD screens. Now that we are holding the first HD Super AMOLED display on a prototype Samsung Galaxy Note, we decided to check if things are advancing with the PenTile pattern on the new HD displays.


To PenTile or not to PenTile – where's my resolution?

Samsung's seed investment Nouvoyance, the company behind the PenTile matrix used in the HD screens of the Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus, informs us that the PenTile matrix technology complies with the accepted VESA standard for display resolution. 

While the PenTile creators say the technology is just different from the stripes we are used to look at with RGB matrices, but its subpixels are a third wider, thus increasing aperture, some argue about the "missing subpixel" paradigm. Others even go as far as cutting the default horizontal and vertical numbers by a third, and then calculating the density from a subpixel standpoint.

Nouvoyance says that the difference in pixel arrangement is clearly visible only when you look closer while displaying small details on saturated red for the RGBG PenTile in AMOLED displays, and when showing them on saturated green for the RGBW PenTile in LCDs, like the one on Motorola's qHD Droids. 

Moreover, the Android UI used some elements that exacerbated the PenTile pattern visibility, such as pixel-wide UI elements, and some fonts on saturated primary colors, where the matrix arrangement could make things appear fuzzy. The ATRIX, for example, used to have this solid green battery icon that showed RGBW PenTile pattern visibility when looked at from very close, so Motorola changed it with one of the software updates. With the new Roboto font in Android Ice Cream Sandwich, built from scratch for high-res displays, this should be even less of an issue.

The premise of the PenTile creators is that their invention is not inferior to the traditional RGB, but actually a different way to arrange a display matrix, where you lose some definition diagonally, visible at lower pixel densities, but gain brightness, ease-to-manufacture, contrast and power efficiency. For higher pixel densities you stand to gain from PenTile, they argue, and, since this novel arrangement is slowly creeping into both LCD and AMOLED screens of various high-end smartphones, starting with Samsung and Motorola, we'd better check if these claims hold water.


We test

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
The corporate Kool-Aid is neverending, that is why we were eager to explore the new HD Super AMOLED using PenTile against the Super AMOLED Plus with a traditional RGB matrix on the Samsung Galaxy S II. We threw in another new phone with huge display, but lousy WVGA resolution for its 4.7" size, the HTC Titan, and added the pixel density king to beat, Apple's iPhone 4, for good measure.

To save you the suspense we want to state clearly that at no point while using the 800x1280 pixels 5.3" screen on the Galaxy Note could we see any jaggies or the pattern of the pixels arrangement - even on individual letters at full zoom at the closest possible distance to our eyes we couldn't discern anything, let alone in normal use. Cold colors making white appear blueish ever since the Super AMOLED on the first Galaxy S - yes, that exists even in the new HD Super AMOLED , but details were the clearest we've seen on any AMOLED to date. 

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?

Left to right - Samsung Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, Apple iPhone 4, HTC Titan
Left to right - Samsung Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, Apple iPhone 4, HTC Titan
Left to right - Samsung Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, Apple iPhone 4, HTC Titan
Left to right - Samsung Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, Apple iPhone 4, HTC Titan

Left to right - Samsung Galaxy Note, Galaxy S II, Apple iPhone 4, HTC Titan


Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
This is somewhat visible in the pictures we took of the screens, but in reality the HD Super AMOLED screen fares even better. If you look at the zoomed in 100% crops of pics made from the same distance, the letter borders have deeper jaggies on the Samsung Galaxy S II, as opposed to the ones from the Galaxy Note display, which are closer to the smoothness of the iPhone 4's screen. 

If we follow the “cut a third” logic, then the Galaxy Note density should go down to about 190ppi from the official 285, and thus fare worse than the 217ppi on the Galaxy S II, which is not the case. Again, this is zoomed to a level that you will never encounter on the phones themselves. 

Of course, the best way to compare an HD screen with PenTile is to pit it against another HD one with traditional RGB matrix, but for now we are working with what we have.

Samsung Galaxy Note and Galaxy Nexus sport HD Super AMOLED - is the PenTile matrix bad for you?
Galaxy Note
Galaxy S II

Galaxy Note

Galaxy S II

We also ran the red test, and indeed the RGBG PenTile display on the Galaxy Note looks as if a fish net texture has been cast over, compared to the traditional RGB stripe matrix on the Samsung Galaxy S II, which shows lines. That, however, is not visible to the naked eye on the Galaxy Note, even if you stretch the picture at maximum in the Gallery.


Conclusion

To wrap it up we'd say that the fears about PenTile appear hugely overblown when it comes to the new HD Super AMOLED technology, which delivers higher pixel density. The folks from Nouvoyance seem to be open about the advantages and disadvantages of their  matrix arrangement, and never said flaws don't exist in certain conditions. Moreover, it seems that PenTile is here to stay, and Samsung is even prepping an RGBW LCD screen with 1600x2560 pixels resolution, resulting in 300ppi at 10.1-inch size.

In any case, if we nitpickers couldn't find anything troubling with the screen on our prototype Galaxy Note, then the average user shouldn't even care what matrix their smartphone or tablet display uses to bring them those entertaining YouTube clips of cats falling off TVs. 

additional info: OLED-A & PenTileBlog

56 Comments
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posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:03 13

1. Eingild (Posts: 203; Member since: 19 Apr 2011)


Nice article. People talk like having Pentile Matrix is a a bad thing. They haven't realize that they're just exaggerating claims, this and that. Bahh! Just enjoy the handset you prefer and live like a normal human being. +1 for the article.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:11 5

15. Synack (Posts: 666; Member since: 05 Jul 2011)


Yes the Galaxy Nexus will indeed be a damn good screen. Now if it were just in my hands RIGHT NOW.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:51

21. willardcw4 (Posts: 169; Member since: 01 Oct 2011)


+1.... ATT Plox =D

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:22 1

24. nak1017 (Posts: 328; Member since: 08 Jan 2010)


AGREED!
I wish this article was up before the other "freak out" articles got posted...

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:25 1

25. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


Yeah, what's PA's deal?
"Is PenTile on the Nexus a dealbreaker?!"
"Why PenTile on the Nexus is not a dealbreaker!"

They're of two minds...

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 17:48

43. RAIDERWILL (Posts: 22; Member since: 07 Aug 2011)


Does not convince me.. I still feel SuperAmoled *Plus* gives the best Visuals for 3D Games and Movie / Slingbox HD T.V... I Love My Droid Charge's Screen..

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 18:08 1

44. andro. (Posts: 1953; Member since: 16 Sep 2011)


pentile or not your right 720p on that size screen is unparalleled in the industry and with super amoled there's nothing not to enjoy!

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 17:02 1

51. ph00ny (Posts: 602; Member since: 26 May 2011)


Pentile is a bad thing on lower res screens and it's very noticeable. Obviously now that we're hitting much higher resolutions, it's starting become a non-issue

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:11

2. chuckyoo (Posts: 34; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


Great article. I wonder since the screen in galaxy note is HD, if the phone can still handle that much with the dual core on battery. I want the galaxy note and people say it is too big, but I want a phoblet, kill two birds with one stone.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:13

3. remixfa (Posts: 13906; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


thank you. tired of fear mongerers worrying about the pentile arrangement. If you look at the last set of pictures, the pentile Note took a better looking screenshot than the PPI king, iphone.

At such resolutions you will have to use a magnifying glass and strain your eyes to tell the difference.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 13:27 1

34. ayephoner (Posts: 837; Member since: 09 Jun 2009)


i think the note looks great. im really pumped to see a galaxy nexus in person.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:17

4. HTCiscool (Posts: 449; Member since: 16 Jul 2011)


Do you want fries with that?

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:20

5. arcq12 (Posts: 733; Member since: 13 Oct 2011)


in real world, pentile doesnt make sense. it's not in existence..

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:29 6

8. arcq12 (Posts: 733; Member since: 13 Oct 2011)


thumb down all you want but what I'm saying is true.. no one can differentiate those displays with their bare eyes unless you use a magnifying glass of some sort. both displays are sick whether it's pentile or not..

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:51 3

20. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


The point is not that PenTile has no disadvantages, it's that those disadvantages disappear when the resolution jumps from 800x480 to 1280x800.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:26 3

6. SuperAndroidEvo (Posts: 4066; Member since: 15 Apr 2011)


Yes I am very excited about HD displays. To me the Samsung Galaxy Nexus looks like a real great phone. The 720p HD Super AMOLED screen seems to be a great choice. Also & to be honest who in their right mind will use a magnifying glass on their mobile phone anyway? The 4.6" 720p HD Super AMOLED screen IS beautiful. Can't wait to see this phone in action!

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:26 1

7. WirelessCon (Posts: 309; Member since: 11 May 2010)


How about comparing 720p video?

How much to the other displays degrade the image?

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:36

9. terabyteRouser (Posts: 419; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


Great article!

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:39 2

10. terabyteRouser (Posts: 419; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


The iPhone 4 is beautiful.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:46

13. kshell1 (Posts: 1143; Member since: 05 Oct 2011)


its also a broken phone waiting to happen. reference to the f'n glass chassis

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:52 1

22. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


The screen is beautiful, yes. But its days at the top are numbered.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 15:35

39. larryvand (Posts: 1; Member since: 21 Oct 2011)


Too small. I can't read it. I currently have an iPhone4 and honest to God, I can't read it without my glasses. And when I use my glasses it gives me a headache. Apple needs to increase the screen size. The Galaxy nexus with a 4.65" and 1280x800 res is the one I'll get. I had it with Apple and the iPhone telling me what I can and can not have. They freaking need a bigger screen. Period.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 10:40 1

11. PimpStrong (Posts: 310; Member since: 25 Jul 2011)


I personally do not like the skinny 16:9 ratio of the Sensation screen which means I won't like how the Nexus' screen will be equally skinny.

Thumb me down if u want but I'll take SAMOLED PLUS in 16:10 over this HD.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:27

17. Leodrade (Posts: 87; Member since: 26 Aug 2011)


16:9 is the best aspect ratio to watch movies but if you don't like it then you should look into the Galaxy Note that is 16:10

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 13:23 1

32. PimpStrong (Posts: 310; Member since: 25 Jul 2011)


I'm good I have the GS2

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:54

23. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


Also 8% of the screen will be for the menu buttons, so the useable space will be a 4.4" 15:9 screen.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 13:24

33. PimpStrong (Posts: 310; Member since: 25 Jul 2011)


So that makes it skinny AND shorter?

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 15:18

36. remixfa (Posts: 13906; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


not true. those buttons dissapear in context to what your doing on screen. watch the video, when your watching a video on the phone, the buttons dissapear and it becomes a giant screen. Im pretty sure individual apps will get control over that feature.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 15:22

38. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


We don't know yet how various apps will control the menu buttons. I'm going to assume the buttons may black out during certain apps but the bar area will only disappear during full screen video.

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 05:50

48. remixfa (Posts: 13906; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


they said during the keynote that a developer could blank out one, 2 or all of the buttons at his will. They are completely contextual to whats going on with the phone.

posted on 24 Oct 2011, 10:16

54. vette21man (Posts: 351; Member since: 06 Apr 2011)


I doubt they will give FULL control to the developer. Imagine a scenario where all buttons on the bottom are disabled, and there are no home, cancel, or done buttons coded into the app's screen? How do you leave the app, or bring up a "recent apps" screen?

There will have to be SOME limitations for the developers, Google still wants an accessible OS.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:07

14. Snapdude (Posts: 128; Member since: 27 Aug 2009)


pentile on the nexus is barely noticeable, i had to throw up screens of all primary colors and stare very closely to see the matrix underneath... and i have more than half decent vision... the brighntess of amoled washes out the pentile imperfections

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:49

27. terabyteRouser (Posts: 419; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


As long as it is not as bad as my Droid 3...

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 13:12 1

31. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


Trust me, it won't be. 316 ppi RGBG PenTile SAMOLED will make 275 ppi RGBW PenTile LCD look like 200 ppi RGB LCD.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:14

16. som (Posts: 768; Member since: 10 Nov 2009)


Galaxy Note new name SmarTab.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:40

18. McLTE (Posts: 699; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


This is a great article! Instead of a bunch of whining and speculating.. some real images to backup the talk!

Judging by these images, I think the PRIME display will be more than adequate. Yes, I'd probably prefer RGB if given a choice.. but I'm feeling confident that the PRIME display will be awesome! Hope we even get a little battery savings from the screen too! :)

The other thing to consider is that the Galaxy Note display is significantly larger than the Primes.. this will only make the PRIME screen that much better!!

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 11:50

19. superguy (Posts: 271; Member since: 15 Jul 2011)


I'll need to see the screen before I make a call. People were saying the PenTile on the Bionic wasn't a big deal and not that noticeable, but I thought it looked like crap. It was very noticeable to me. I'll have to see it in action to see if the blockiness is there. The note looked good in some ways, but saw the blockiness in the red wavy pic.

I'll wait and see. Shouldn't be a big deal as long as it looks better than my Fascinate.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:28 1

26. roldefol (Posts: 2865; Member since: 28 Jan 2011)


People who said PenTile on the Bionic wasn't a big deal and not that noticeable were making excuses for the phone. "So the screen isn't that great... it's the BIONIC! The best phone ev-- ooo look, Droid Razr!"

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:52

28. terabyteRouser (Posts: 419; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


The Bionic's PenTile is different than the AMOLED PenTile. The Bionic uses RGBW PenTile - which is an exrtra white pixel. And the AMOLED uses RGBG PenTile.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 12:54 1

29. protozeloz (Posts: 5375; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


if this is the huge galaxy note then this may look even better on the Nexus whereas the screen is much smaller

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 13:08 1

30. c1985 (Posts: 10; Member since: 21 Oct 2011)


"We also ran the red test, and indeed the RGBG PenTile display on the Galaxy Note looks as if a fish net texture has been cast over, compared to the traditional RGB stripe matrix on the Samsung Galaxy S II, which shows lines. That, however, is not visible to the naked eye on the Galaxy Note, even if you stretch the picture at maximum in the Gallery."

Do they not realize that the 'fishnet texture' is on the screen itself and not the picture? Zooming in on a picture will not zoom in on the fishnet texture that you see on the screen. Pen-tile is not a deal breaker but I do prefer standard RGB LCDs.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 15:19

37. remixfa (Posts: 13906; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


lol. nice catch. lolol.

a good pentile screen hides its faults well. the naked eye cant tell the difference at regular usage distances.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 14:46

35. AppleConspiracy (Posts: 629; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


With super high pixel densities PenTile screens should not have problems with graininess and similar issues, but I think they allways suffer from inaccurate color reproduction, especially in white, because they have to compesate for different surface areas of subpixels. That's why white balance is disturbed and generally they like to go on the bluish side. I don't even want to think what's going on with other colors if white is already a problem. However, I support AMOLED technology even with PenTile configuration because it offers something more significant for handheld use - extreme contrast, vibrant colors and easy readability overall. Phone users are not graphic designers and professional photographers and that's not their primary workstation, we could live without exact color reproduction on phones as long as we have crystal clear images.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 15:59 1

40. pegasus912 (Posts: 1; Member since: 21 Oct 2011)


Thank you for posting this balanced article. I just came from Engadget and saw that awful article about the Galaxy Nexus' screen being a minus, so it's nice to see someone actually doing some side by side comparisons instead of a short opinion piece.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 16:06 1

41. RORYREVOLUTION (Posts: 2985; Member since: 12 Jan 2010)


I cannot wait for the Galaxy Nexus, ICS is going to be amazing.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 16:22

42. taz89 (Posts: 2014; Member since: 03 May 2011)


i know how you feel have not felt this excited over a phone and os since the iphone 4 the nintendo ds lol...got the gs2 so the only thing i want is ICS and thankfully am in the UK where samsung phone get regular and quick update

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 20:41

45. cncrim (Posts: 503; Member since: 15 Aug 2011)


Who care ..... the screen looking awesome to me I would buy Nexus. I don't think the average people can tell the diffirence.

posted on 21 Oct 2011, 21:38

46. NeXoS (Posts: 278; Member since: 03 May 2011)


How the hell is Samsung able to make a1600x2560 pixels resolution, 10.1-inch size screen for a tablet, but I can't find a 13" laptop with a 1080p screen? And have it be IPS or even better, Super AMOLED Plus?

And laptop manufacturers wonder why laptop sales are slowly dropping?

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 03:25

47. AppleConspiracy (Posts: 629; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


Laptops belong to the PC paradigm, not the new handheld paradigm introduced by Apple, and they can't be viewed with same criteria.
There are number of reasons why PC screen resolutions are "low" and with small pixel densities. The main reason is gaming industry, which utilizes state-of-the art real-time graphics, followed by graphic card manufacturers, who adapt performance according to standard display resolutions. For instance, at this moment, most advanced consumer graphic cards are able to give satisfying performance on 1080p resolutions. However, they will choke on higher resolutions, say 2560x1440, which are obligatory if someone wants to have near-300ppi density on 10-inch tablet... that's why tablet gaming industry is still on 2D graphics with 3D on a 1999-level... It is generally accepted that in PC industry simple anti-aliasing can provide adequate compensation with gain in performance.
The second reason is adaptation on 72 (Mac) and 96 dpi (Win) standards - pixel densities on computer monitors are around that number (although they can vary) - with high pixel densities typefaces and UI elements would be extremely small as they don't have scalable dimensions. In early 2000s IBM developed extremely high-resolution monitors, but they were impractical and graphic cards were too weak for demanding applications. Besides, PC and laptop monitors are mostly viewed with different distances in comparison to handhelds, so even 150+ pixel density would be sharp enough for the human eye from that distance, while smartphone or tablet demand over 250+ density - at least!
The other reasons are historical develoment of standards with various technical parameters, which could change in the near future as tablet market is conquering the world. I'm sure we wil soon see the change it that paradigm as conditions of consumer market is adapting on different approach and as hardware is becoming more and more capable, but it's not an easy task - it never is with changing of standards.

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 05:52

49. remixfa (Posts: 13906; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


another reason would be shelf life. PC monitors need a much longer shelf life than phones. If i remember correctly, a Super Amoled screen only has an average shelf life of 3-5 years of usage, where a PC monitor of course can go for probably a decade or longer.

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 06:05

50. AppleConspiracy (Posts: 629; Member since: 18 Oct 2011)


OLED technology has a problem with lifespan in general, are you sure you didn't mix that with LCDs?

posted on 22 Oct 2011, 19:50

52. glos7777 (Posts: 4; Member since: 22 Oct 2011)


btw galaxy note have to NFC support ?

posted on 24 Oct 2011, 09:31

53. vette21man (Posts: 351; Member since: 06 Apr 2011)


GREAT ARTICLE!! I especially love the photo that shows each screen close up in its own quadrant.

However, it still bugs me about the advertising, I know we nerds are the only ones that care about the advertised ppi vs perceived ppi.

I'm just wondering what a Super AMOLED "PLUS" 720p display would look like. Would we notice a difference between the pentile version and the "plus" version on a 4.65" screen? Further, wondering if Samsung, etc. would market it like crazy as the next best thing..."Super AMOLED+ HD" if pentile is truly "good enough."

If nothing else, I tip my hats to the genius marketers that cater to the general public that don't care about such details. At the same time, it angers me that it basically feels like lying.

posted on 24 Oct 2011, 16:48 1

55. bananakid (Posts: 7; Member since: 24 Oct 2011)


Like many had pointed out, non-pentile still has an edge over pentile in terms of sharpness, hands down - for now. I own the original pentile N1 and comparing to the later SLCD variant of it, pentile clearly sucks. But with the introduction of 720p mobile screens this year, their gap apparently got a lot closer. Next year, when they pump it up to 1080p, the remaining gap will be insignificant, if not gone. Together with the fact that pentile matrix costs less and easier to manufacture, pentile is the future.

posted on 25 Oct 2011, 23:29

56. denney (Posts: 98; Member since: 20 Oct 2011)


Does anyone else notice that the text pixelation closeup makes the HTC Titan's display look better than the others when it has the lowest resolution and PPI of them all? SLOGAN!: "Microsoft- Better... even when it's not."

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