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Smartwatches are getting banned by colleges and universities worried about cheating

Posted: , by Alan F.

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Smartwatches are getting banned by colleges and universities worried about cheating
First, it was the mini-calculator. Colleges and universities worried that students could possibly cheat on math tests using them. But because prices have allowed the device to become ubiquitious, most schools will allow students to use them on certain tests. Then came the smartphone, bringing Google in tow. And while those have been banned from exam rooms, along comes the smartwatch.

A couple of months from now, the Apple Watch is expected to be released which should send the popularity of connected timepieces soaring to a whole new level. One university out of London said last year that the Apple Watch would create "a problem in the examination hall from 2015 and beyond," mostly because proctors wouldn't be able to tell the difference between the device and your typical unconnected digital watch. Part of the focus on the Apple Watch is due to Apple's plan to make the device part fashion item, part tech device.

Universities around the globe have started banning all watches from the exam room since it really is not feasible to ask a proctor to examine each student's timepiece. City University in London now considers a smartwatch to be the same as a smartphone when it comes to students taking an exam. That means that students attending that University remove their smartwatch and smartphone and put them in a plastic wallet under the desk. Exam rooms at City University now have more large clocks hanging on the wall, and students can request a desk clock to check the time while taking an exam.

"Students are already asked to place mobile phones in a plastic wallet under their desk, so we adopted the same procedure for watches. Students either don’t wear them to an exam venue, or they remove the watch in the venue and place it in the plastic wallet...we also increased the number of large wall clocks available in the examination venues, bought small desk clocks for any student who requests one as well as a small quantity of RNIB-approved desk clocks for use by any student who needs one."-City University (London)

The next device for colleges and universities to worry about? How about the smartring?

source: BuzzFeed via MacObserver, SlashGear

55 Comments
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posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:10 1

1. Neros (Posts: 1016; Member since: 19 Dec 2014)


Just because certain universities in certain countries do that, it doesn't mean such devices are prohibited everywhere, PA.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:15 1

2. RebelwithoutaClue (Posts: 2796; Member since: 05 Apr 2013)


Where does it say everywhere?

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:20 3

3. Neros (Posts: 1016; Member since: 19 Dec 2014)


Just look at the title. It clearly implies a larger/more global approach.

Should've added "some" or "few" to the title.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 17:58

21. techperson211 (Posts: 1184; Member since: 27 Feb 2014)


I think it should be. Smart watches is an extention of our smart phone and sooner or later we don't have to pull it out. We just have to check the smart watch. I'm still in to conventional watches though.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:35

4. Evan_C (Posts: 146; Member since: 15 Dec 2014)


haha!

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:42 4

5. sherkhan (Posts: 33; Member since: 02 Oct 2014)


Already Two Cases in my College in India ...Both of them were copying from their Sony SW2..
Both of them got a Year drop and the Principal took their watches

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:48 5

6. Derekjeter (Posts: 829; Member since: 27 Oct 2011)


It's funny that the smart watch will be relevant now that Apple will make one. Just like NFC and large screen on the iPhone 6 plus. "It doesn't matter until apple makes it"

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 10:53 4

7. LetsBeHonest (Posts: 1392; Member since: 04 Jun 2013)


But Large screens are relevant but not because of Apple makes one IMO. There were plenty of large screen smartphones. It just forced Apple to follow them not the other way around.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 23:57

29. ardent1 (Posts: 2000; Member since: 16 Apr 2011)


Sorry, but Apple worked on the smartphone with "large screens" first. What Apple found was that these large devices would have to wait until the display technology, battery technology, processor technology (like 64-bit processing), etc was available.

While other companies introduced large screens into the market place to help differentiate themselves from Apple's 3.5" screen, these commercial introductions does not negate the simple fact that Apple had worked on the idea first.

In summary, Apple waited years for the technology to arrive as opposed to following the android competitors. Just ask yourself where are Samsung's smartphones with 64-bit processors that came out to match the iPhone 5S?

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 00:49 1

30. tedkord (Posts: 10884; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


That is out and out a lie. What Apple found was that, contrary to what they kept insisting, people did want a large screen, and Apple hopped on the bandwagon reluctantly (and half assedly, offering 760p and 1080p when the market had moved on).

In summary, Apple resisted the clear trend for years, and the tech not only arrived before Apple caved, it went even further, as evidenced by devices like the GS5 having a better screen than the 6 month newer iPhone 6.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:07

47. lyndon420 (Posts: 4124; Member since: 11 Jul 2012)


Steve was a brilliant visionary, but he refused to look past 3.5". Apple had little choice but to wait for him to pass before they could move on with fresh ideas.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 07:45

35. iushnt (Posts: 1592; Member since: 06 Feb 2013)


Such a pointless post.. It's not that Apple was waiting for technology improvement.. They had ipads with larger screen with similar hardware setup of iPhones.. Battery life wasn't a problem either.. They were just insisting.. Keeping the pressure so that when it explodes it will get massive openings..

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 08:13 1

36. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


I'd love to see a 3.5" screen on a phone with a non slide out physical keyboard or on a flip phone.

But let's say your right and Apple was first to a large screen phone, what did they do then? They stagnated until a tiny bump in size 5 years later, and then a more significant one 7 years later, and that just to keep them near what the competition was doing.

So yeah, they innovate, then stagnate for a few years, then innovate just enough to keep themselves close to their competition.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 11:54 2

9. RebelwithoutaClue (Posts: 2796; Member since: 05 Apr 2013)


Perhaps in the USA and UK, but NFC, larger screen and smartwatches were already relevant in many other countries. Smartwatches are already banned from exams in my country and NFC payments have been accepted in a lot of stores already.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 13:12

12. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Because Apple sets the trends and the standards

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 16:38 2

18. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


Because their user base will buy whatever product Apple puts out, so it's a guaranteed success. I've rarely if ever heard you say "No, I think I'll pass" when rumors or an announcement of a new Apple device come to light. It's usually something on the order of "My body is ready".

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 21:25

25. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Actually I wasn't too sure of the iwatch when it was first unveiled. That's just what you want to assume.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 21:41 2

28. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


Really, here's one of the first articles I found you responding to about the Apple Watch. It was only a fan render, which is funny when you read your first comment.

http://www.phonearena.com/news/iWatch-concept-render-based-on-patent-filings-could-be-more-than-just-fan-hype_id40016

The next article doesn't sound like you had any qualms about it, especially when you consider this was still in the rumor phase.

http://www.phonearena.com/news/Apples-iWatch-revealed-in-patent-application_id40060

And here's the third article you commented on the Apple Watch, again still in the rumor phase with nothing concrete except for the fact that they were working on a smart watch.

http://www.phonearena.com/news/Analyst-Apple-iWatch-could-be-6-billion-business_id40459

Yup, you really sounded hesitant to purchase the Apple Watch, with absolutely nothing concrete to go on.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 01:03 1

33. tedkord (Posts: 10884; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


Yeah, he's never been "not too sure" about any Apple product. If they were to release the original iPhone exactly unchanged next year as the iPhone 6s, he'd proclaim it the best phone ever.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 13:02

41. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Tedkord let me know when you plan on removing your head out of your rear end.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 13:01

40. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Actually those comments were before Apple unveiled it. Good effort but not good enough.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 14:53

44. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


OK, so you waited a whole month before jumping back to your previous stance, wow you are a mountain of hesitation. And these devices haven't been released yet and you're all in. I wait until I can see them myself before I decide to make the plunge. I've found most professional reviewers and many end users have some bias that colors their judgement.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:47

51. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


It took me a little more than a month to be convinced of the iWatch. What are you trying to prove anyway?

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 18:10

53. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


What am I trying to prove? If you can't see it you're dumber than I thought, and that's saying something. I'm saying that Apple could sell herpes in a box and you'd say "My body is ready". Of course you wouldn't be sure about it at first, right?

I mean they've already said that it would get a full day of battery life, then less than a full day of battery life, and then said it would be depending on how much you use this feature or that. And yet, you have no qualms about it, you're ready to dive headlong into it. And let's be real, manufacturer battery estimations are always generous, so figure less than what they're figuring. But that won't affect you, even though you were hesitant for what, a month and a half then? Is that what it was? I mean FFS. For someone who thinks he's smarter than everyone else in the room, you can be pretty thick.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:10

48. lyndon420 (Posts: 4124; Member since: 11 Jul 2012)


'Take my money' is a common term as well.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 19:14 2

22. Slammer (Posts: 1515; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


Technology started to advance at an alarming rate a little more than 60 years ago. Apple was not around then. Apple as others, took ideas and capitalized on them, "helping" leapfrog advancements. Only the original iphone can be considered monumental in the day of bridging the UI experience of smartphones. Everything else is revolutionary; not evolutionary.

You need to sit down and study the history of technology and its advancements. You would be surprised of past and present unknowns that had more of an impact of where we are today. Sales is not a technological advancement. It is a profit driven component mastered by cunning sales pitches and subliminal mind tactics.

John B.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 21:26

26. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Really? Before the iPad, was there really a market for tablets? I'll wait for your ridiculous answer.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 01:00

32. tedkord (Posts: 10884; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


There was a market. It wasn't huge, mostly because the tech wasn't there for such portability then, and the used full blown operating systems, not mobile ones.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 08:17

37. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


Correct. Things like tablets, or even laptops for that matter, where the used more for work than entertainment back then. Before the smartphone boom, no one was streaming music, and the only video services around was YouTube with about 1/50th of the content it currently has. High tech gear was for work, not play back then.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 13:04

42. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


No there wasn't. There was no consumer market for tablets like there is now. It was pretty much a niche market before the iPad changed things.

Checkmate

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 14:47

43. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_tablet_computers

Like he said, while the non business tablet market was limited, there were products available. But at that point, there was no subsidy in place for people to buy these at reduced rates, and with the higher cost of these devices, as there always is in the initial offerings, most people couldn't justify the price.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:03

46. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


And you do realize, first you said, there was no consumer market for tablets, then it was a niche market. A niche market is a market. No market is no market.

It wasn't the device itself that really made the market, but what you could do with the device. Streaming audio and video, and web browsing with a high speed connection is what made these devices. Take that away and these devices wouldn't be what they are today.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:45

49. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


You can spin it in whatever way you please. My original point still stands.

It takes a brand name to go out there and set an example. You're in a bad state of denial if you think Apple hasn't set a standard.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 18:16

54. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


What point, that there was no market for tablets, when we've shown there was, however small. And you're comparing trying to sell people a $2000+ device vs a $400 device? Gee, that's hard to figure out isn't it?

But just humor me here, if there wasn't streaming audio, video, or high speed connections to which to consume that content, would the iPad sell? Because that's the era the first tablets existed in. Think back to the early to mid 90s, what could've been done on a tablet back then? And would that be been worth $2000+?

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 17:47

50. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


I don't think you know what a subsidy is. There's no subsidy for a tablet sold unless you get one via the many promotions floating around at different carriers or authorized retailers.

A $400 iPad bought isn't subsidized.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 18:02

52. VZWuser76 (Posts: 4026; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


Yes, I know what a subsidy is, which is why I also clarified about the cost of production going down from the original devices that were offered pre iPad. People who bought their iPads subsidized through a carrier did so because they couldn't afford the full price of the iPad.

Both the EO Personal Computer and the Compaq Concerto cost over $2000, which might explain why people didn't buy them in droves. As the cost of production goes down, it also lowers the cost of the product itself. So, like I said earlier, the initial offerings are going to keep most people away. Google Glass is another example, subsequent versions will likely be less expensive and sell better than Glass did.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 08:26

38. j2001m (Posts: 2881; Member since: 28 Apr 2014)


It's clear there was a market due to how small the iPhone screens was and now they got bigger the iPad if now sold for new would not sell going by what happening right now on there sales

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 11:39

39. Slammer (Posts: 1515; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


There were numerous designs back in the 70's to introduce a thin computational, mobile product that resembled tablets. Check out the Linus Write-top. While it was not as celebrated or recognized as the iPad, it was a modular tablet housed in a desktop base that could be removed for mobility. It also didn't have the marketing to blaze the consumer base.

Again, you really need to back down and recognize achievements developed by little unknowns that larger companies said:

"Wow, what a great idea". Steve Jobs was notorious for panning field trips to places where he heard things were in concept.

If you love technology, explore the history. If not, then you are just another blind Apple lover that thinks there is nothing else.

John B.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 00:50

31. tedkord (Posts: 10884; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


In the case of everything he listed, Apple hopped on the bandwagon and adopted the standards set by others.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 17:50

20. Taters (banned) (Posts: 6474; Member since: 28 Jan 2013)


I think sad or pathetic is a more accurate word than funny. Sigh...Humanity...

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 11:24

8. InspectorGadget80 (unregistered)


Man seriously people are getting lazier.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 12:50 1

10. darkkjedii (Posts: 20566; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


Got my AppleWatch in the mail last night, loving it so far, then I woke up. Hurry up Apple, get this thing out.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 13:12 1

13. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Lol I was about to be insanely jealous.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 15:37

15. darkkjedii (Posts: 20566; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


Man, I wish it were April. Head to the Moto chief article, meanestgenius is on our jock today.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 21:27 1

27. Mxyzptlk (Posts: 12486; Member since: 21 Apr 2012)


Oh lord. I better go get some cheese first.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 13:55

14. Neros (Posts: 1016; Member since: 19 Dec 2014)


Get the Chinese knock-off and troll other sheep :D.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 19:30 2

23. willard12 (Posts: 1619; Member since: 04 Jul 2012)


The battery must have died during your dream to make you wake up. You must be tired after only 3 hours of sleep.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 13:08 2

11. Cyberchum (Posts: 668; Member since: 24 Oct 2012)


Where is brighttjedii?

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 15:38

16. darkkjedii (Posts: 20566; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


How about you look him up. Good luck finding him.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 16:30 1

17. nctx77 (Posts: 1858; Member since: 03 Sep 2013)


Good thing I finished college back in the 90's. APPLE, TAKE MY MONEY!

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 17:02

19. darkkjedii (Posts: 20566; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


+1 bro, mine too.

posted on 07 Feb 2015, 21:21

24. techloverNYC (Posts: 601; Member since: 20 Nov 2012)


If we are able to cheat based on the tiny info on the smartwatch screen. Maybe the subject you getting tested on in the college is not that important. Anyone ever notice that most hour long college lectures can be explain in 10 mins on google? College need to maybe like cut down some major departments, most students learn nothing from college studies showed.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 03:11

34. Chamarahcd (Posts: 10; Member since: 01 Feb 2015)


Fortunatly I end my school time.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 15:44

45. DillWeed (Posts: 149; Member since: 14 Mar 2014)


Holy hyperbole, PA! But then again you never claimed to have anything to do with journalism.

posted on 08 Feb 2015, 21:00

55. ambrown (Posts: 33; Member since: 06 Sep 2012)


Is this really surprising? I've already thought about the looming bans on smartwatches, especially since there are some varieties that have cameras, can call and text, and yes, even Google things. Not to mention having access to notes or other documents. It may take some schools a while to catch on, and it will no doubt be a random slew of cheaters who bring this issue to the forefront, but eventually smartwatches will receive the exact same welcome as smartphones in the classroom.

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