x PhoneArena is hiring! Reviewer in the USA
  • Hidden picShow menu
  • Home
  • News
  • Galaxy Note 7R (FE) gets benchmarked once again, hints at more than acceptable performance

Galaxy Note 7R (FE) gets benchmarked once again, hints at more than acceptable performance

Posted: , by Peter K.

Tags :

Galaxy Note 7R (FE) gets benchmarked once again, hints at more than acceptable performance
You'll never guess the alleged benchmarks of what phone just got leaked out!

No, it's not the upcoming OnePlus 5, this one already got benchmarked a few days ago. 

We're talking about none other than the upcoming refurbished version of the Galaxy Note 7, which might have made a promising appearance on Geekbench, one of the larger benchmark databases. Depending on who you ask, the phone will be either called the Note 7R or the Note 7 FE (Fan Edition), but anyways, the important part here is that the upcoming safe handset is forming up to be a powerhouse that seems to have achieved some pretty high single- and multi-core scores.

Galaxy Note 7R (FE) gets benchmarked once again, hints at more than acceptable performance

From what we're seeing, the octa-core Exynos 8890 chipset inside the refurbished Note 7 is performing pretty similarly to the Exynos 8895 and the Snapdragon 835 chipsets that power the Galaxy S8 and S8+. In our tests, the Galaxy S8 clocked in at 2006 points in the single-core test and 6708 points in the multi-core exercise.

The Note 7R is rumored to come sometime this July, boasting the same Note 7 design and hardware specs, save for a smaller, yet safer (or so they say) 3,200mAh battery at the rear. This means a Gorilla Glass 5 protected 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display with a 1440 x 2560 QHD resolution, 64GB of native storage, IP68 certification, as well as a rear 12MP f/1.7 camera with OIS and phase-detection autofocus. One of the few things that will separate the refurbished from the original Note 7 is purportedly going to be a big letter R, printed on the lower-right side of its back.

As we know more, so will you.


source: PrimateLabs via GSMArena

11 Comments
  • Options
    Close





posted on 19 Jun 2017, 11:07 1

1. UglyFrank (Posts: 1906; Member since: 23 Jan 2014)


Single core on android is really stagnant (as per).
My S8+ gets 2011 and the S6 was getting ~1500, they really need to shake things up.

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 12:55 7

4. trojan_horse (Posts: 4167; Member since: 06 May 2016)


"Single core on android is really stagnant (as per)."

That's because Android doesn't prioritize single-threading... So there is no point in focusing more on single-core than multi-core.

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 15:53 1

7. clarity (Posts: 1; Member since: 19 Jun 2017)


I hope you understand that not all tasks can be split efficiently between multiple cores. That's why single core is more important than multi core and why iPhones usually get the lead over android in terms of speed and heavier tasks

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 16:58

9. crzykiller (Posts: 71; Member since: 03 Jan 2015)


iPhones are faster because the software is more optimized and has nothing to do with single core performance. Also nearly every android app that exists now uses 4 or more cores. Also the OnePlus 3T beats the iPhone in speed tests because it actually has optimized software.

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 18:58

10. trojan_horse (Posts: 4167; Member since: 06 May 2016)


"I hope you understand that not all tasks can be split efficiently between multiple cores"

Android automatically splits tasks to multiple cores depending on the load and priority. Even old apps which were developed to run on single-core would be multi-threaded automatically.

"That's why single core is more important than multi core and why iPhones usually get the lead over android in terms of speed and heavier tasks"

What you fail to understand is that iOS isn't Android. So, multi-threading is more important with Android.

In terms of speed and heavy tasks, there are other factors at play, such as Storage, RAM, and of course the OS itself.

Do you think iPhones alwayss get the lead in heavy tasks? Well, try playing 10-bit video file on an iPhone 6s (dual-core) then play it also on the Galaxy S6 (octa-core) and you'll see how much multi-core matters!

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 13:07

6. marchulya (Posts: 52; Member since: 18 Nov 2014)


mine too 2011 single & 6706 multi )))

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 12:23 2

2. ahmuzencab (Posts: 92; Member since: 12 May 2017)


Niiiceee!!!

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 12:51 2

3. darkkjedii (Posts: 23902; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


Glad to see such a bad ass phone, get another shot. Sans battery, it was the best phone for me, till the S8 Plus came along.

posted on 20 Jun 2017, 09:01

11. Flash (Posts: 416; Member since: 19 May 2017)


No it wasn't.

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 13:05

5. Nexus4lifes (Posts: 178; Member since: 13 Feb 2014)


hope they pit this (price wise)against the one plus 5.
i bet the Note 7 will have better screen, and based on this benchmark score performance on par with sd 835.

posted on 19 Jun 2017, 16:40 2

8. redmd (Posts: 1334; Member since: 26 Oct 2011)


Am i the only one who still love the Note 7 design?

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Latest stories