Supposedly safe Galaxy Note 7 catches fire in China, Samsung tries to offer another as replacement


We're not sure if this should be considered incompetence, stupidity or a little bit of both, but it looks like Samsung wanted to cover up another episode of “Galaxy Note 7 catching fire.” Since these practices have become the norm for big companies like Samsung, it might not look so unusual if not for the way the company tried to handle this particular issue.

What's really surprising and baffles us to the point of filing the report under “hard to believe” is the fact that the person owning the exploding Galaxy Note 7 was offered another Galaxy Note 7 as replacement.

Apparently, a former firefighter in China recorded a video of his Galaxy Note 7 catching fire and then asked Samsung for explanation; which came in the form of two employees who showed up at his house later that day to offer him a brand new Galaxy Note 7 and around $900 in compensation.

However, in order to receive the money and the new Galaxy Note 7, Zhang Sitong would have to keep the video he recorded private, something that he did not agree.



Samsung has been the bread and butter of tech media for weeks now, but that trend doesn't seem to slow down at all as more and more reports show how the South Korean company is trying to handle the Galaxy Note 7 recall.

Despite the fact that Samsung announced it has permanently discontinued the production and sales of the Galaxy Note 7, the handset maker is now left to deal with the recall of 1.9 million units that were in the hands of customers when the second recall was issued last week.

On top of that, the South Korean company will probably have to deal with a fair share of lawsuits filed by disgruntled customers or companies seeking financial advantages.

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