85% of Galaxy Note 7 units replaced in South Korea, but does it really matter?

85% of Galaxy Note 7 units replaced in South Korea, but does it really matter?
Korean Agency for Technology and Standards recently announced that about 85% of faulty Galaxy Note 7 phones have already been replaced in the country. Considering the fact that Samsung sold around 456,000 units in South Korea, it means that 389,000 device has have been exchanged or refunded by the handset maker.

In fact, Samsung confirmed that 352,000 units have been exchanged with new, supposedly safe Galaxy Note 7 phablets, while 21,000 contracts have been canceled and the rest were refunded. Although there are still 70,000 faulty Galaxy Note 7 phones in the hands of customers, there's little chance that these will be replaced with new units.

At least two replacement Galaxy Note 7 units 'decided' to blow up in South Korea this week, but there are reports of similar cases in other countries as well. Although Samsung said that it can't issue any statements until it finishes its investigation, it's pretty clear that these replacement units aren't safer than the original Galaxy Note 7 phones that were sold before September 15.

On that note, Samsung is said to have stopped Galaxy Note 7 production and some carriers in the United States have already decided to stop offering these unsafe replacements. Customers who own a Galaxy Note 7 are now advised to exchanged them for other Samsung models or smartphones from other brands.

However, many have decided to ask for refunds and decide later on what to get instead. Suddenly, Google's new Pixel phones seem like interesting alternatives to the explosive Galaxy Note 7. The LG V20 is a viable solution as well for those who want some a bit uncommon (given the secondary small display).

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16 Comments

1. tiara6918

Posts: 2263; Member since: Apr 26, 2012

Even though pa keeps on saying the pixel phones might be an alternative to the note 7. Will google sell it if htc doesn't have an official branch in the country like korea,philippines..etc? Take for example, the nexus 9 was not officially sold in those countries

2. iluvsonynokia

Posts: 161; Member since: Aug 27, 2013

Recall all n7 ,replacing with new batch n7 is risky

7. LetsBeHonest

Posts: 1548; Member since: Jun 04, 2013

If the issue still persists even on new ones like the article says then they should recall them again or discontinue the whole note 7. If they made a mistake then they should surely pay the price.

3. LetsBeHonest

Posts: 1548; Member since: Jun 04, 2013

"It's pretty clear that these replacement units aren't safer than the original Galaxy Note 7 phones that were sold before September 15." It is bit too early to make such conclusions. Of course I do feel suspicious on Samsung. But I believe it is too early to judge on Samsung right now. Lets hear the official statement then compare study with those factors we already have and finally come to a conclusion rather than jumping mere assumptions so soon.

4. Derekjeter

Posts: 1466; Member since: Oct 27, 2011

They need to come out and say "we f**ked up, we're gonna stop selling it and we're moving on the S8". Just move on there's nothing they can do to salvage this. They should just concentrate on making the next phone a beast and make sure you test it. They should really stop making so many phones in one year. Just focus on two phones a year and make them epic and affordable. That will beat the iPhone.

8. Bankz

Posts: 2531; Member since: Apr 08, 2016

Yes but it will be made a lot more easy if the samsung knights can just RETURN. THEIR. DAMN. NOTE. 7. NOW!!!

11. Kumar123 unregistered

People will be scared of upcoming samsung phone wither it will be their flagship phones or low class entry level phone. That's how scared/paranoid people are about samsung phones. It's not just note 7 other samsung phones are also selling slower sells thanks to this explosion. Samsung will try really hard with S8 or whatever they call it but people will be reluctant to their phone at least initially.

12. iC-118

Posts: 260; Member since: Sep 29, 2016

Kumar why do you hate Samsung so much?

5. Bankz

Posts: 2531; Member since: Apr 08, 2016

Return. Your. Note7. That it's even a debate is ridiculous.

9. TerrellAmerica unregistered

It's hard to do, it's like your baby

16. kiko007

Posts: 7493; Member since: Feb 17, 2016

People return those all the time too...

6. legiloca

Posts: 1676; Member since: Nov 11, 2014

It does matter, explosion ratio has decreased dramatically, only media tends to blow it out of proportion :)

10. Wiencon

Posts: 2278; Member since: Aug 06, 2014

That's what you get when battery is non replacable by user. Somehow LG can keep this feature on high end phones

13. iC-118

Posts: 260; Member since: Sep 29, 2016

I'm so happy the Note7 was a fail. I hated that edge design, that they took and mixed it up with the Note series. I was really assured that the N7 would be flat design like it's previously. I've never missed not buy the Note of theirs. But this junk tall slim skinny and edged screen really put me off. The N7 is not wide like the N5.

14. piyath

Posts: 2445; Member since: Mar 23, 2012

Note 7 was a nice phone overall. Fanboys made me hate that phone so much. They tried to overhyped it and give it a place which it does not deserve. There are better phones than that for sure, at least according my standards. BTW here goes a nice phone in vain. RIP NO 7

15. iC-118

Posts: 260; Member since: Sep 29, 2016

I only see and have 2 garbage negatives about this N7. Hate tall skinny long phones. Nothing like the original Note Hate the shty 3500mah. Where others have 4000mah Hate the standard 4gb Ram. Where's 6gb Ram is great Hate the edge curved glass screen. Flat screen and flat rear

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