Google Messages leak hints at satellite messaging allowing you to text anyone, anywhere

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Google Messages leak hints at satellite messaging allowing you to text anyone, anywhere
A closer look at the latest Android 14 QPR3 Beta 2 release has got the tech world buzzing about the possibility of Android 15 bringing satellite messaging to the table. But guess what? Google Messages seems to be dropping some hints, too, suggesting that this satellite connection could be not only for messaging from anywhere but with anyone.

According to 9to5Google, a trio of explanatory strings in the beta version 20240329_01_RC00 sheds some light on how satellite messaging functions in Google Messages. Reportedly, these strings read:

  • To send and receive, stay outside with a clear view of the sky
  • Satellite messaging may take longer and can’t include photos & videos
  • You can message with anyone, including emergency services

The third string hints that you won't be restricted to just emergency services; you will be able to message "anyone" in your contacts via SMS. This could take the satellite connectivity capabilities of Android smartphones a step beyond Apple's Emergency SOS via satellite feature, which, as the name implies, only allows you to send distress signals when you are off the grid.

The smartphones with satellite connection support landscape is getting hotter as tech titans like Google, Apple, Samsung, and Huawei enter the cosmic connection race. With satellite connectivity anticipated to debut on Android phones through the release of Android 15, theoretically, all devices running on it could potentially support this feature.

Meanwhile, Huawei has already dived into the realm with its Mate 50 series, enabling you to make calls and send satellite messages even when you are not linked to cellular or Wi-Fi networks. However, there is a catch – it's currently limited to China.

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Unlike traditional smartphones, those equipped with satellite connection support break free from reliance on cell towers. Instead, they directly connect with satellites orbiting the Earth. When you make a call or send a message, the signal travels from your phone to the nearest satellite and then bounces to a ground station on the network before reaching its final destination. This setup guarantees connectivity even in remote areas without cellular coverage.

As we get closer to the rumored reveal of Android 15, possibly happening at Google's annual I/O conference on May 14, you can bet more leaks will start popping up. Keep your eyes peeled for updates!

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