Samsung Galaxy Note 9 price speculation ramps up with yet another credible leak

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 price speculation ramps up with yet another credible leak
With Samsung’s official Galaxy Note 9 announcement still a little over a week away, we’ve reached a point in the pre-launch buzz-building campaign where it’s simpler to wonder what we don’t know about the “next big thing.”

One very important puzzle piece that hasn’t technically been revealed yet is the phone’s recommended price point in the US, although it’s certainly not hard to make an educated guess based on history, general market trends, as well as rumored numbers for regions as diverse as Western Europe and Southeast Asia.

Yet another leaked promotional poster seems to reveal the Galaxy Note 9’s pricing structure for Samsung’s homeland of South Korea today, largely aligning with our expectations and previous speculation of a similar nature.

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 price speculation ramps up with yet another credible leak

Once again, we’re seeing just 128 and 512GB variants mentioned, strongly suggesting there will be no configurations accommodating 64 or 256 gigs of data internally. The “entry-level” SKU is tipped to cost 1,090,000 won, roughly equating to $970, while that digital hoarding-friendly 512 gig model could fetch as much as KRW 1,350,000 ($1,200).

There are also three dates listed under the two price tags, and although this writer is not particularly fluent in Korean, one can safely assume Samsung is preparing to kick off pre-orders on August 10, close them on the 20th, and start shipments, as well as make physical inventory available in regional brick and mortar stores on August 24. That also falls largely in line with existing rumors about the phone’s global release. So, yeah, this puzzle is almost complete, despite that glitzy Unpacked event only taking place next week.

source: Weibo via Slashleaks

Related phones

Galaxy Note 9
  • Display 6.4" 1440 x 2960 pixels
  • Camera 12 MP / 8 MP front
  • Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 845, Octa-core, 2800 MHz
  • Storage 512 GB + microSDXC
  • Battery 4000 mAh(29h 3G talk time)

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17 Comments

1. torr310

Posts: 1619; Member since: Oct 27, 2011

The price of Note 9 would be a push for S9+ and Note 8 sales.

7. izim1

Posts: 1591; Member since: Feb 04, 2013

It never has been. S-pen has pretty much always been about 100 more than galaxy+ model. Doesnt seem to bother anyone.

2. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

I want the 16.9 screen back 8gb Ram or 12gb Ram Get rid off this ugly POS tall skinny narrow TV remote.

4. AmashAziz

Posts: 2873; Member since: Jun 30, 2014

6.4 inch 16:9 phone will be too big. And 12GB RAM?? You stupid???

5. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

The more RAM your CPU has access to, the easier its job becomes, which enables a faster computer. If you do not have a sufficient amount of RAM than your CPU has to work much, much harder to transfer data, which severally damages the computer's performance. Random access memory also helps your system support software." So you would prefer to live and stay in a house with less space? Maybe to you it's big others would prefer.

8. AmashAziz

Posts: 2873; Member since: Jun 30, 2014

Phones hardly need 6GB RAM, and you are doubling down on that. Phones and PCs are totally different things and the latter need 12GB more. And for your kind information, 12GB RAM chips for phones aren't available yet. Please..... increase your knowledge.

11. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

8gb +4gb together Or 6+6gb

15. AmashAziz

Posts: 2873; Member since: Jun 30, 2014

JUST WHY???? Didn't u read already that smartphones don't need even 6GB? Grow up.

13. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

nother issue is that Android does not use native apps, it uses a JVM (Dalvik or ART). For the most part, Android apps are not native machine code, they are a special intermediate code (Dalvik bytecode) that is compiled at install or run time. The JVM is a fairly heavy bit of code, providing tons of services to apps that a typical PC OS does not. The use of a JVM means that Android apps run more resource heavy than most PC apps which are optimized, self-contained native code. Granted, if you use Java JVM or a similar virtualized/interpreted language on PC it will be RAM heavy too, it's just that the JVM is a separately installed program rather than a core component of the OS.

14. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

nother issue is that Android does not use native apps, it uses a JVM (Dalvik or ART). For the most part, Android apps are not native machine code, they are a special intermediate code (Dalvik bytecode) that is compiled at install or run time. The JVM is a fairly heavy bit of code, providing tons of services to apps that a typical PC OS does not. The use of a JVM means that Android apps run more resource heavy than most PC apps which are optimized, self-contained native code. Granted, if you use Java JVM or a similar virtualized/interpreted language on PC it will be RAM heavy too, it's just that the JVM is a separately installed program rather than a core component of the OS.

6. Y.S.L..

Posts: 232; Member since: Jul 03, 2018

Most iFans don't know what to do in between the yearly iRapture events. For some of them, perhaps those whose iFaith is faltering, there is a need to make all these mockups of the upcoming iHolyDevices, to tide them over until their patron, Saint Ive, brings down the real thing from iHeaven. Says the Apple iWorshiper

17. torr310

Posts: 1619; Member since: Oct 27, 2011

Yes I also prefer 16:9. With 16:9 ratio, 6-inch would be plenty of viewable area already. No need to be 6.4 inch!

3. BLUEBLASTER

Posts: 908; Member since: Feb 23, 2014

So happy to see 512GB. When will we get 1TB in phones?

9. AmashAziz

Posts: 2873; Member since: Jun 30, 2014

Why do you even need that?

* Some comments have been hidden, because they don't meet the discussions rules.

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