New useful feature being tested for Android version of Google Maps

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New useful feature being tested for Android version of Google Maps
Over the years we've watched as the Google Maps app has grown. Instead of just giving you turn-by-turn directions getting you from point "A" to point "B" safely and on-time, Google Maps now helps you decide what places you'll visit and where you'll dine when you arrive at "B." And Google Maps has added several features related to driving. For example, the speed limit in the current area you are driving through now appears on the map and accidents, speed traps, and other incidents can be reported so that other Google Maps users can benefit from your experience.

According to Droid-Life, Google is now testing the addition of traffic lights to the app. The icons for the traffic lights are small but appear larger while navigating. We should point out that Apple has added stop signs and traffic lights in Apple Maps. On iOS, Siri will point out both when you make a turn by one of them.

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The traffic lights were found by an Android user running Google Maps build 10.44.3. Frankly, we wouldn't be surprised to see Apple and Google battle each other with their navigation apps. Apple has been working hard at removing the stench that spilled all over its Maps app when it was first launched in 2012. If you aren't old enough to remember this fiasco, countries and cities were mislabeled-when they were labeled at all. Police in Australia called Apple Maps "potentially life-threatening" when it navigated unsuspecting motorists to an area of the Outback with poisonous snakes, very little water, triple-digit temperatures, and spotty phone reception.


Many iOS users still prefer to use Google Maps although we must let you know that the traffic lights are being tested on the Android version of the app only.

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