HTC is making a blockchain phone

HTC is making a blockchain phone
HTC has just confirmed that it is making the "world’s first major blockchain phone", a mysterious device that is likely to cost around $1,000 and that allows the user to own their digital identity.

The upcoming device bears the HTC "Exodus" codename, but details about it are covered in mystery and the only thing that we have about this phone is a blueprint drawing. HTC has previously said that it is working on such a phone, but just recently confirmed the details and now commits to releasing it by the end of the year and revealing further details about pricing towards the third quarter of this year.

HTC has even created a weird chief crypto officer position in the company and here is what this new CCO says about the upcoming phone:


The phone will be all about the unique approach to user data that is available in the blockchain and the security and protection that come with it. Here is the whole appeal of this new phone, summarized in one sentence:

“We envision a phone where you hold your own keys, you own your own identity and data, and your phone is the hub.”

The upcoming phone will be available all throughout the world with one important exception:

"I want to say it will be available definitely everywhere outside of China," the executive further clarifies. "China has different rules, everywhere from regulations to how Android even works in China."

Will this be the mass-market phone that will save HTC and bring it back to its glory? It does not sound so, as the upcoming HTC Exodus sounds like a niche device aimed at a particular group of users, but we're yet to see whether it will have any mass-market appeal.

To help with that aspect, HTC has also partnered with popular game Cryptokitties where you digitally trade cats, a fun way of exploring the blockchain.

source: HTC

FEATURED VIDEO

19 Comments

2. Bozzor

Posts: 248; Member since: May 02, 2012

This strikes me as hype based around the word that many people have heard, but few truly understand from a technical perspective. Is a blockchain phone truly of benefit to consumers? If so, how? And how is it different/better than current security solutions...or have we got it all wrong, and the blockchain phone is just an indication all its components were sourced from materials and transformed in a way that is legal, ethical and environmentally friendly?

3. NexusX

Posts: 613; Member since: May 16, 2013

The article says nothing about what a blockchain phone is. Maybe the author should do a bit more research before posting this. Is it a phone with a built-in blockchain based application or a wallet for cryptocurrency. A blockchain only works if you have huge network of users sharing their conputing power. Makes zero sense if HTC is selling 10 of these phones. HTC is so desperate that they are just throwing buzzwords around to see what sticks

4. cmdacos

Posts: 4114; Member since: Nov 01, 2016

Not sure why HTC is making any phones at this point let alone a blockchain phone that nobody wants...

5. tokuzumi

Posts: 1870; Member since: Aug 27, 2009

They'll do a great job with the hardware, but carrier support in the US will be non-existent. Also, they will probably do a 6"+ screen, and won't do any type of s-pen. HTC likes to make niche devices, but for some reason, they won't try to cut into the note market. If HTC undercuts Samsung by ~$200, and their software is on point, they could put a dent in the phablet market.

6. andrewc31394

Posts: 290; Member since: Jun 23, 2012

Most people don't have a stylus, and don't care about one coming with their next phone.

15. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

I don't think the margins at Samsung are large enough to support those kind of cuts for another OEM to undercut Samsung by that much. It will cost HTC more to make the equivalent parts because of a lack of scale that Samsung and others enjoy, and HTC will have to underprice it significantly to get it to sell over its competitors, but I just don't think the margins are large enough for HTC's creation to survive in the market today after all that extra cutting and costing...

16. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

I don't think the margins at Samsung are large enough to support those kind of cuts for another OEM to undercut Samsung by that much. It will cost HTC more to make the equivalent parts because of a lack of scale that Samsung and others enjoy, and HTC will have to underprice it significantly to get it to sell over its competitors, but I just don't think the margins are large enough for HTC's creation to survive in the market today after all that extra cutting and costing...

17. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

I am so sorry for all of these double-posts... I type on my keyboard, and then have to wait for five minutes or more while my typing slowly appears in the window letter by letter, space by space, and then I press the "post comment" button, and the screen goes blank for like another fifteen minutes, and when it suddenly re-appears, if I don't have to reboot the computer first in order to stop it from crashing/freezing, if it re-appears at all, and by the time I find my way back to PA, I find that I have multi-posted anywhere from twice to six or seven times for absolutely no reason at all. This trouble has kept me from posting at all a number of times, and keeps coming back to haunt me.

7. JimmieCrakCorn

Posts: 143; Member since: Nov 20, 2017

Pure gimmicky hype as usual. HTC will fail as usual.

10. Humanoid

Posts: 1226; Member since: Dec 11, 2017

Notch is gimmick.. Almost all are using

11. andrewc31394

Posts: 290; Member since: Jun 23, 2012

it's not really a gimmick, its just making more screen space

18. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

That depends on how you look at it. If you are a "screen should be the height of the top pixels" person, then yes, the notch may seem like an encroachment on what could have been a larger screen; however, if you are, instead, a "screen doesn't have to be as high as the top pixels" person, then the 'real' screen ends at the bottom of the notch, and any space above that line is bonus real-estate that the OEM did not really have to give you...

9. lyndon420

Posts: 6743; Member since: Jul 11, 2012

They might be on to something here. Time will tell.

12. krauser1

Posts: 19; Member since: Jan 19, 2012

“We envision a phone where you hold your own keys, you own your own identity and data, and your phone is the hub.” There is no way in hell I would trust HTC with any of that.

13. Zylam

Posts: 1813; Member since: Oct 20, 2010

Another flop in the making.

14. xtroid2k

Posts: 601; Member since: Jan 11, 2010

So, wouldn't everything else have to support blockchain?

19. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

More than ever, HTC is a great acquisition target for a larger competitor like Apple to take over before they can really ruin themselves by going this 'blockchain' direction with the company. Apple could use HTC as a way to undeniably compete directly with all other Android OEM's, making a cheaper Android Go product than others that still works well for what it is. Apple could limit it, optimize it, and give it some stylistic flair... maybe fork away from the original Android Go a little... but keep it lite... and people in the emerging markets would clamour to own one even at a (relatively) high price. And they would get rid of all this 'blockchain' nonsense forthwith. Think of it... with the kind of scale of economy that Apple has, they could make the phone for less than $50, and turn around and sell 'em for $200-a-pop. They could call it the "iPod Flip", and market it alongside the "iPod Legacy", a retooled traditional iPod Touch for 2018, for $300-a-pop. For once, Apple would not just control 13% of the worldwide smartphone marketshare - they would control more and more of the Android marketshare, and hence even more of the worldwide smartphone pie!

20. domfonusr

Posts: 1083; Member since: Jan 17, 2014

… and if that's not enough, there is always the fact that HTC's patents for smartphones, which go way back to the early 2000's or so, could be very useful to Apple. They would be able to defend themselves from Samsung without any problems (in the event that Samsung tried to get their litigation money back from Apple, by some stretch of chance), and they could patent-troll their little hearts out in order to get arrangements made with Android OEM's all over the place, or even Google directly. Imagine what would happen if Apple got an arrangement like Microsoft did with Android: if, for every Android handset that was manufactured, Apple got like $10 or $15 or more? Imagine what that would do to the smartphone landscape. Apple would be guaranteed profits from Android sales, and Google would have to shell out precious resources to Apple... Android phones would become more expensive, or else Google and OEM's would end up eating the costs which would cut into their profits, making the iOS vs. Android fight even more lopsided on the profits-end of things!

* Some comments have been hidden, because they don't meet the discussions rules.

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.