Do you use your cell phone while driving and for what: Poll results

Do you use your cell phone while driving and for what: Poll results
In light of the NTSB's (National Transportation Safety Board) recent request for a ban on all electronic device usage (yes, phones included) behind the wheel, we asked you last week if you have the unhealthy habit of using your cellphone while driving. Now, we're ready to share the results of the poll with you, and we have to say that we're delighted to see that almost all of our readers are exceptionally strict, and taking safety very seriously!

To be more specific - our readers always make sure that all the doors of the vehicle are tightly closed, and that they have their seat belts on, before they set off. If they are driving during the night and it's dark outside, headlights are an absolute must - no compromise whatsoever! Young drivers? They always have an experienced one next to them, just in case. All of this comes to show that we fully understand our responsibilities on the road and are always putting safety first.

We guess this would have allowed the participants in our poll to be some very responsible drivers... if they actually weren't totally obsessed by their smartphones, to the point of being unable to get their eyes off the screen, and set them on the road. That's right, maybe we would have had a bit socio-friendlier results if we were a food-recipe site, but since we aren't, PhoneArena readers made a clear statement, with a majority of 36.25% saying they use their handsets for whatever they want — including calling and texting — while in the car (we do appreciate your honesty). Now that we've recognized how badly we need a change in our habits, feel free to check out what else our readers are using their phones for while driving below.

What do you use your phone for while driving?

Calling, texting... whatever I want.
36.25%
Texting... (guilty face).
2.91%
Calling via a Bluetooth headset.
14.4%
Navigation.
15.37%
Listening to music.
16.34%
No phone usage at all. Safety first!
14.72%

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14 Comments

1. roldefol

Posts: 4744; Member since: Jan 28, 2011

Eyes on the road? Pfft. That's what seat belts, side airbags and insurance are for.

2. Birds

Posts: 1172; Member since: Nov 21, 2011

Idiot, I hope it all fails while you are texting or whatever and you are flung over a cliff and fall 1000 feet to you likely demise!

5. roldefol

Posts: 4744; Member since: Jan 28, 2011

That's why I stay away from 1000-ft cliffs at all costs while updating my Myspace profile at 70 mph.

9. Synack

Posts: 688; Member since: Jul 05, 2011

Dude, don't wish death upon somebody. Cmon.

12. nak1017

Posts: 328; Member since: Jan 08, 2010

How serious are you taking a comment with the sound "Pfft" written out?

3. Sniggly

Posts: 7305; Member since: Dec 05, 2009

Well, this article is a little unfair. I picked the first option, but my eyes are almost always glued to the road when I'm moving. I will only do an occasional glance in the phone's direction while I'm driving.

4. quakan

Posts: 1418; Member since: Mar 02, 2011

same here

10. Penny

Posts: 1844; Member since: Feb 04, 2011

Same with everybody else who's gotten into an accident because of it. Not saying you aren't a good driver, but everybody feels like they are invincible until something goes wrong...

6. cybervlad81

Posts: 89; Member since: Apr 04, 2011

Using your phone in a vehicle is not an absolute safety issue. I use mine every day, to listen to podcast and music, but I set it up through my car speakers and before i start driving... I also text, i can't justify that one, and make calls - which is no worse than talking to a passenger. The out pour of vehicle accidents involving cells is just because so many people use them... the same people that are distracted by their phone would most likely just be distracted by some other object or daydreaming otherwise. Bad drivers are bad drivers no mater what you put in the car with them, Blaming it on a phone is like blaming MCDonalds for making fat people.

7. cfprelude

Posts: 140; Member since: Oct 27, 2011

needed to be able to pick multiple options... like navigation and listening to music. that'd be 90% of my usage. although i have to admit i was sitting at a stop waiting on a train to pass by (for over 10mins) when i filled out the survey via phone :P

8. roldefol

Posts: 4744; Member since: Jan 28, 2011

I text and call (usually hands-free but depends on whether I'm expecting a call) and while I'll admit it's distracting, I don't feel it's any more distracting than fiddling with the radio, flipping through an iPod, looking for my sunglasses or *gasp* eating fast food. I imagine those of you with small children can add another dozen distractions to that list. If they're out to avoid distractions entirely, the only solution is to institute a "hands at 10&2" law. Don't single out phones just because they're the latest culprit.

11. ZayZay

Posts: 571; Member since: Feb 26, 2011

They just need to plant magnets in everyone's hands and magnets all over the car so you can only use your hands for all the cars devices (AC, steering wheel, etc...) And when you try and use your phone it reacts negatively and makes it impossible to use... Yeah that's what they should do...

13. Kmack

Posts: 26; Member since: Nov 15, 2011

Unfortunately, i think touchscreens probably increased the number of car accidents. T9 flips made it easy to text without looking, and physical keys help guide you around your keypad. I'm still using mine for calling/texting/checking email etc.

14. daniel_bargs

Posts: 325; Member since: Nov 27, 2010

there are really people who dont care about someone's safety. their hands itch if they dont hold their phones while driving. i feel sorry for the million casualties caused by happy-go-lucky drivers.

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