Introduction


The latest Samsung Galaxy J7 was unveiled in Europe just over a month ago, and since then AT&T has started selling its own Galaxy J7 2017 – with specs and styling much more akin to the J7 V released for Verizon in March. In fact, the outward appearance of the phone shows that this is the same phone but with slightly tweaked internals. The J7 actually has many variants, all in the mid-range field. This particular one seems to blend elements from Verizon’s J7 V, released in March, and the unlocked 2016 Galaxy J7, which was released in April of last year. Selling for $240 off-contract, AT&T’s new J7 2017 has a lot of competition. This price and configuration lands it in the company of the higher spec’d 2016 J7, Motorola’s consistent and reliable G series, and even some solidly spec’d Chinese brands, like the well-received Honor 6X. Leaving aside screen size, the iPhone SE also competes in this price range. So, does this mix-n-match remix offer enough of Samsung’s flair and capability to win out decisively over these highly competitive, unlocked, and AT&T-friendly mid-rangers?

Design

Plainly put, it looks like a Samsung Galaxy Note 2


Samsung has certainly shown strength and innovation in designing flagships like the Galaxy S8, so we know they’re more than capable in this area. Unfortunately, little, if any innovation has gone into the design of their mid-rangers, up to this point. At face value, the J7 looks a lot like a Galaxy Note 2 (minus some sensors) – a nearly five-year-old phone. The large metallic “Samsung” lettering and silver earpiece grille combine with the also silver, non-backlit haptic buttons, and silver bezel surrounding the home button – which lacks a fingerprint scanner – altogether giving this phone an aged look, evoking a throwback to Samsung’s days of plastic smartphones with silver plastic accents. Fortunately, the silver accents end there, as rubberized plastic coats the edges and backing of the phone.

In back is a lone horizontal metal stripe, about a half-inch wide, which encompasses the 8 MP camera and single-LED flash – neither of which is raised from the backing. On the right side, you’ll find the phone's metal speaker grille, also encased in the metal stripe. Although an unusual placement, it’s one we didn’t mind, as we never found ourselves covering it, and projecting the sound forward is always a plus. Lower down on the right side, you’ll find the very clicky, even loud, lock button, placed exactly where it should be for accessibility. The similarly loud and clicky volume rocker on the left side, however, is slightly higher on the edge of the phone, requiring you to inch your fingers up the side to access it when using the phone with one hand. Looks aside, the thick rounded edges coupled with the intermediate 159-gram weight, lend the J7 to a solid in-hand feel. Thinner large-screened phones can often feel slippery in the hand, but the thicker, curved edges at least afford this handset a better grip.

Samsung Galaxy J7 (2017) AT&T

Samsung Galaxy J7 (2017) AT&T

Dimensions

5.96 x 3.01 x 0.34 inches

151.5 x 76.4 x 8.6 mm

Weight

5.6 oz (159 g)

Samsung Galaxy J5 (2017)

Samsung Galaxy J5 (2017)

Dimensions

5.76 x 2.81 x 0.31 inches

146.3 x 71.3 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.64 oz (160 g)

Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017)

Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017)

Dimensions

5.75 x 2.81 x 0.31 inches

146.1 x 71.4 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.61 oz (159 g)

Honor 6x

Honor 6x

Dimensions

5.94 x 3 x 0.32 inches

150.9 x 76.2 x 8.2 mm

Weight

5.71 oz (162 g)

Samsung Galaxy J7 (2017) AT&T

Samsung Galaxy J7 (2017) AT&T

Dimensions

5.96 x 3.01 x 0.34 inches

151.5 x 76.4 x 8.6 mm

Weight

5.6 oz (159 g)

Samsung Galaxy J5 (2017)

Samsung Galaxy J5 (2017)

Dimensions

5.76 x 2.81 x 0.31 inches

146.3 x 71.3 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.64 oz (160 g)

Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017)

Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017)

Dimensions

5.75 x 2.81 x 0.31 inches

146.1 x 71.4 x 7.9 mm

Weight

5.61 oz (159 g)

Honor 6x

Honor 6x

Dimensions

5.94 x 3 x 0.32 inches

150.9 x 76.2 x 8.2 mm

Weight

5.71 oz (162 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page



Display

Surprisingly good clarity in most situations. For what the screen lacks in color range, it overcompensates with brightness


The company opted for an LCD panel rather than AMOLED, for which most Samsungs are known. The J7 still pulls off some vibrant, and decently accurate colors in most situations. The display does lean quite noticeably toward the colder/bluish side, though, an affect that is seen most easily in its representation of purple, white, and some blues.

We were surprised by the absence of our longing for a 1080p screen, though. Clocking in at 1280x720 and 267 ppi, this TFT display actually does a good job with detail. Zooming in on high-resolution photos produces none of the grain or pixelation we were dreading. We don’t mean to sound so surprised, but a 5.5-inch, 720p, TFT screen had us worried. The display is also a very bright one; maxing out at 628 nits, we had to keep the brightness way under the 25% mark just to make the screen easier to look at. No ambient light sensor exists, so you don’t have the option for auto-brightness, but rather the not-so-well-thought-out “outdoor mode” which raises the screens brightness for 15 minutes when enabled, or indefinitely if the screen remains on.



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2 Comments

1. rdaex

Posts: 152; Member since: Oct 24, 2012

Id like to see a comparison between things like this, the K20, the Stylo3 Plus, the Moto G4, and like... a LG G3 or Galaxy S4. Thats a common situation for a lot of folks. Keep an older flagship phone, or upgrade to a modern mid-ranger.

2. StuffIHad

Posts: 1; Member since: Mar 30, 2018

Wow, does the author have stocks so Apple or is just an Apple fanboy. This article while it starts alright it finishes with a very biased suggestions and misses a lot of points. Saying things like you better off with an iPhone is a fanboy only comment. The J7 has a user replaceable battery and a micro SD card slot. That alone makes any iPhone a harder sell. I imagine that the people looking at a J7 are likely to be previous Android owners (since iPhone are premium only priced phones). Therefore they are used to Android and likely to have chargers (car & home), plus applications. It mentions some insignificant advantages like better rear camera video capabilities, or finger scanner. You know what is awesome to have a functioning phone one that is alive and running The J7 has a pretty amazing battery life (only 8 phones are listed by phone arena with longer battery life) with 3 to 4 hours of longer battery life than the iPhones suggested by the fanboy author. In addition it has an micro SD card slot you can have up to 262GB (265 + 16) of storage with you (unlike the either of the suggested iPhones) something that anyone techies and "dads" can use. They are smart PHONES. That means if it can't be a freaking phone who cares what else it can do. Who cares if the phones "looks dated" (which I disagree), or "feels cheap" (it has a gorilla glass 4 so is harder to get the "modern" crack or scratch screen look). Is this phone great. Well the phone part is pretty good talk time around 40 hours (or multiple times what the iPhones can do). Sound quality is good and reception seems b alright. Pros + Great battery life + User replaceable battery + up to 262GB of storage + Gorilla glass + very good front camera Now what is annoying about the phone. -No NFC -No notification LED -No light sensor for the screen -Dual unlock screens (or 2 steps to unlock screen with pin/swipe) -Poor low light camera performance (using stock app)
Galaxy J7 (2017) AT&T
  • Display 5.5" 720 x 1280 pixels
  • Camera 8 MP / 5 MP front
  • Processor Samsung Exynos 7 Octa, Octa-core, 1600 MHz
  • Storage 16 GB + microSDXC
  • Battery 3300 mAh(40h talk time)

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