Thanks to Samsung's new models, heat-pipes might become popular in smartphones

Thanks to Samsung's new models, heat-pipes might become popular in smartphones
Samsung apparently wasn't convinced that the Snapdragon 820 chipset wouldn't overheat like its predecessor, the Snapdragon 810 chipset. After all, it was Samsung that practically led manufacturers to avoid the Snapdragon 810 SoC whenever possible last year. For Samsung, this led the company to employ their own Exynos 7420 chipset on all of its high end models, even in regions like the U.S. where traditionally a Snapdragon solution was used.

Manufacturers didn't have too many options to replace the Snapdragon 810 with last year. Some turned to the Snapdragon 808 SoC with its hexa-core CPU. Some phone vendors focusing on the Asian markets went with MediaTek. Others throttled down the Snapdragon 810 in an attempt to turn down the heat.

Samsung decided that for its new handsets, the Samsung Galaxy S7 and Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, those in the U.S. and China will get the phones powered by the Snapdragon 820. Others will find the Exynos 8890 chipset under the hood of their new Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 edge unit. But as we said, Sammy might not have been totally comfortable with the heat generated by Qualcomm's latest and greatest chip. We say this because there is speculation that those Samsung Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge units powered by the Snapdragon 820 feature a heat-pipe.

Adding a heat-pipe to a smartphone improves the device's ability to cool down. According to a report published today, this is a cooling solution that might be employed in more units in the near future. The report notes that most producers still tend to use graphite in combination with a phone's metal chassis to keep a phone from overheating. Other handsets use software to throttle the CPU when the phone gets too hot.

The majority of suppliers that produce smartphone heat-pipes are so conservative about demand for the product, they have yet to spend the money needed to build a mold. Most handsets require a custom design for the pipe; combined with the short life cycle that smartphones have, heat-pipe makers don't see the point in producing a mold. But if Samsung reveals that there is a heat-pipe inside some of its new flagship phones, perhaps demand for the part rises.

Watch the suppliers, because they will tell the story. Once you see them spending money on molds for heat-pipes, you can be sure that other smartphone manufacturers are using the pipes in order to offer better thermal management for their handsets.

source: Digitimes

Related phones

Galaxy S7
  • Display 5.1" 1440 x 2560 pixels
  • Camera 12 MP / 5 MP front
  • Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 820, Quad-core, 2200 MHz
  • Storage 32 GB + microSDXC
  • Battery 3000 mAh(28h 3G talk time)
Galaxy S7 edge
  • Display 5.5" 1440 x 2560 pixels
  • Camera 12 MP / 5 MP front
  • Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 820, Quad-core, 2200 MHz
  • Storage 32 GB + microSDXC
  • Battery 3600 mAh(36h 3G talk time)

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106 Comments

1. BradyCrack

Posts: 835; Member since: Dec 29, 2015

Would that thicken the devic?

27. vincelongman

Posts: 5732; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

These devices already had thin aluminum plates Replacing those with thin heat pipes would have a thickness difference of probably about 0.3-0.5mm tops I'm wondering when we will see Fujitsu's heat pipe sytsem There one would be no different in terms of thicknesshttp://www.fujitsu.com/global/about/resources/news/press-releases/2015/0312-01.html And their one would actually improve thermals noticeably Unlike the current ones which are pretty useless except for glass/plastic phones

87. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

NO! It won't if done right. The Latest S I think are thicker because of the battery. Even if it does make it thicker, SO WHAT! How thin do you want a phone to be. They are all already too thin or thin enough. We don't need cheap bending phones, which we saw last year.

99. j2001m

Posts: 3061; Member since: Apr 28, 2014

This full post is crap phone area, both Samsung own CPU and the sd 820 got the heat pipes due to SAMSUNG VR

90. xondk

Posts: 1904; Member since: Mar 25, 2014

Not to any horrific degree, depending on how much extra cooling needed maybe 0.3-0.5 mm as also written below, which is not something you will notice, the whole 'thin' race is a bad thing anyway. Phones are getting so thin picking them up from a flat surface can be tricky, if you have larger hands + slick metal designs.

103. HighOnAndroidFTW

Posts: 185; Member since: Apr 26, 2015

PHONE ARENA... Is not "speculation" that there is a heat pipe inside the s7/s7 edge with the 820 in them. Samsung announced it in their unpacked event that there was a great dissipating pipe in the new s7 and s7 edge that used an evaporation technique...

104. HighOnAndroidFTW

Posts: 185; Member since: Apr 26, 2015

Heat* dissipation pipe

2. submar

Posts: 713; Member since: Sep 19, 2014

Z5P is using dual heat pipe.

10. TerryTerius unregistered

The difference being that Samsung is a far larger and arguably more influental manufacturer, and thus they have a much better chance of popularizing it.

28. vincelongman

Posts: 5732; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

Sony have been using heat pipes since the Xperia Z2 AFAIK But yea TerryTerius is right, Samsung are more influential

72. magnanimus

Posts: 565; Member since: Mar 29, 2013

You guys mention this fact now but throw a fit when people say the same about Apple. They might not be the first to do some stuff but they certainly used their influential power to make it popular.

74. vincelongman

Posts: 5732; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

Really? Anyone but fanboys/haters would agree Apple is the most influential, followed by Samsung

78. TerryTerius unregistered

I've never taken credit away from Apple for popularizing the modern smartphone or certain other ideas. So I'm not sure what you're talking about.

80. magnanimus

Posts: 565; Member since: Mar 29, 2013

I'm not talking about you in particular. Its just one of the norms of the site. Lots of commenters don't giving Apple credit where due.

79. submar

Posts: 713; Member since: Sep 19, 2014

You're right. But many ppl will then claim that it is Apple's innovation and bash the others

89. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

No one throws a fit when its Apple, you just see it that way.

108. magnanimus

Posts: 565; Member since: Mar 29, 2013

Quite ironic you'll reply to this techie despite the fact you're one of the people I'm referring to. I've seen countless comment from you downplaying touch ID, 64 bit processing and many other features Apple made popular.

88. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

yep and it still a suck phone from Sony.

111. romeo1

Posts: 819; Member since: Jan 06, 2012

At least it can multi task

3. insyt

Posts: 52; Member since: Sep 16, 2015

Yeah this article is amazing. The truth is Samsung just copied this feature from devices that used the S810.

8. manojmcn

Posts: 634; Member since: Jul 16, 2015

The difference here is, those manufacturers lied about the heat issue. They kept justifying SD810 and later were forced to switch to S808 to save face. Samsung genuinely explained the design in their presentation.

70. Subie

Posts: 2398; Member since: Aug 01, 2015

Microsoft was upfront with their liquid cooling of the sd810 last year.

100. mitchytan92

Posts: 92; Member since: Mar 02, 2015

93. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Not every device that had an S810 used this. Even if they did, Samsung is doing what is needed to insure, what happened to those other lazy OEM's won't happen to them which is why they were smart enough to not even use the S810. Even phone that did have a cheap-pipe, they still ran too hot and required a sofwtare updated to lower the clock to help prevent overheating. Are they copying? Sure! but yes its so easy to choose the ignorant side of the situation. Copy of not, for such a device this is the only solution to deal with heat. After all PC's and GPU's have been using heat pipes for years. How is moving it to a phone copying? It is simply the only solution for a phone. Also those other OEM's I dont think uses a liquid cooling solutions. They just through some copper rods in the case and hoped for the best and they all got burned...LITERALLY. So what OEM copy each other. If the copy provides me a benefit, do it. Samsung isnt taking any credit from any OEM, like Apple typically does. So what's you beef? EVERYONE COPIES> When is the last time you saw an original idea on a phone? Last time i saw one, it appeared on several Samsung devices first. #justsayin.

4. Shuhailnp

Posts: 8; Member since: Apr 19, 2013

i thought the exynos version is using heat pipes in s7!

12. hakn5897

Posts: 21; Member since: Dec 19, 2015

exynos version also has a heat pipe

37. rd_nest

Posts: 1656; Member since: Jun 06, 2010

You don't want heat pipes. If it uses heat pipes, it means there is throttling issues. Like Anandtech reported in Mi5 hand-on: "A bit worrisome was the rather high 1 core power load but it’s still too early to determine if this is CPU-core related or rather power from another SoC block." "820’s GPU is yet again oversized for smartphone form-factors as power figures are well above sustainable thermal envelope of phones such as the Mi5, so significant long-term throttling should be expected."

77. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

No plz. Not again. I dont want any heat issue. I didnt purchase any phone in 2015 due to sd810/808. I dont want it happen again.

101. mitchytan92

Posts: 92; Member since: Mar 02, 2015

At least the heat pipes make the situation better than without heat pipes.

5. Sidewinder

Posts: 515; Member since: Jan 15, 2015

So that would only make the Exynos chipset better as less heat would mean less waster energy which translates to better battery savings. Sd820 many jot overheat thanks to the heatpipe but still all that generated heat is wasted energy which is a sign of inefficiency. I sure hope the Indian market gets the Exynos variant if this is the case.

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