Samsung Milk Music has finally hit its expiration date in the US

Samsung Milk Music has finally hit its expiration date in the US
Music streaming services seem to be a dime a dozen nowadays. While the most notable stars in this market are Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play Music, services like Pandora, Slacker, Deezer, and others are still fighting to have some considerable share of the market. Samsung tried breaking into this field just about two years ago with Milk Music with the though that it'd catch on with promoting and marketing with their ultra-popular Galaxy handsets. The service had a fair run, but as of yesterday on September 22, Milk Music has finally expired in the United States.

We knew this date was coming, as Samsung made the official announcement about a month ago that the service had an end date in sight, but it's still a bit sad to see it finally shut down for good. I personally used Milk Music off and on in between Spotify and Google Play Music, and while it certainly was more akin to services like Pandora than anything else, the app itself was fun to use and the music selections were actually quite good. While I wouldn't consider myself a loyal user of Milk Music, I did enjoy my time with with the service when I did use it.


For those who don't know, Milk Music was powered by Slacker Radio. With the expiration of Milk Music, Samsung is looking to keep its partnership with Slacker in order to allow their users of Milk for a smooth transition between services. If you'd been a user of Milk Music up until now, Samsung will be giving you access to Slack Plus for 14-days for free. However, once those 14 days are up, you'll have to shell over $3.99/month in order to keep getting the benefits that come along with Slacker Plus. The benefits that you get there are quite similar to what was offered with the paid version of Milk Music, so if you were previously a paying subscriber for that, the transition should be quite easy for you.

Slacker's CEO Duncan Orrell-Jones appears to be hopeful amidst the shutdown of Milk Music, saying -


If you were a user of Milk Music, will you be navigating over to Slacker Radio, or will you be setting your sights elsewhere?

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16 Comments

1. ctdog4748

Posts: 797; Member since: Mar 05, 2016

Too bad, so sad. Another failed Samsung venture, not supported by loyal Samsung fans.

7. xondk

Posts: 1904; Member since: Mar 25, 2014

I want to bring up a slightly alternative wording. Those that enjoy and use Samsung products are not going to buy a product if it is inferior.. As for it being 'failed' it is an insane uphill battle for anyone that starts it even Apple Music isn't doing that great, or at least as great as predicted initially.

8. truthwins unregistered

Such a foolish thing to bring apple into a non- apple article. This shows that samsung fanboy suffers from inferiority complex.

14. xondk

Posts: 1904; Member since: Mar 25, 2014

How...exactly does that work? I'm mentioning a fact, that is it, people were expecting Apple Music to gain more then it has, and I use it to point out that if Apple of all people have it tough, then is it really a surprised this didn't work? I'm using Apple in a positive light, saying that they normally can charge to the top of sales? so you decide to say I have an inferiority complex?....I do wonder why you feel the need to say that, since isn't that normally something...you know those with said complex have do?

12. tedkord

Posts: 17318; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

If it's not good, we don't support it. That's how we differ from folks like yourself.

2. Unordinary unregistered

R.I.Pieces

3. bubbadoes

Posts: 1225; Member since: May 03, 2012

another failed product

4. bubbadoes

Posts: 1225; Member since: May 03, 2012

while apple music rolls on

13. tedkord

Posts: 17318; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

Apple Music, second place, just like their other products.

5. truthwins unregistered

first losing market share in china then nuke 6 and this milk music expiration samsung mobile division end is near

6. JunitoNH

Posts: 1946; Member since: Feb 15, 2012

We did not need another music app, especially one with such a weird name for music. Samsung has some good tech devices, but the US division should have some input in branding. I remember years ago when GM introduce the Chev Nova to Latin America, and all the hurdles they faced, cause someone forgot to do their homework. Ultimately, it forced GM to pull the vehicle. Lets not forget MS with its Lumia fiasco. Everything is branding and presentation, like a good dish.

9. Commentator

Posts: 3722; Member since: Aug 16, 2011

Maybe if they had named it Samsung Music or Galaxy Music or something... What user ISN'T going to think something named Milk Music is some random third-party bloatware?

10. aegislash

Posts: 1479; Member since: Jan 27, 2015

Yeah, I didn't even know it was Samsung's music service until last year. I had just assumed it was carrier bloat. Is there a story behind the name? Were S Music and/or Samsung Music/Galaxy Music already patented by a patent troll or something?

11. joe.m

Posts: 8; Member since: Sep 17, 2016

When the service first launched, Samsung gave a very Samsung-like answer by saying they named it because their music was "fresh and organic" like milk.

15. Fona13A unregistered

S U C K I T D O W N

16. Planterz

Posts: 2120; Member since: Apr 30, 2012

I really liked Milk. Way better than Rhapsody. Put in old metal like Dio or Iron Maiden and it'd play Nu metal and metalcore. Ask it to play Otis Redding and it'll play R. Kelly. Milk was fantastic though. It wouldn't stray outside the genre, and it introduced me to artists and bands I wasn't familiar with. I guess I'll check out Slacker. I've never actually paid for a subscription music service, but $4/mo is pretty dang cheap.

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