Google X labs working on next-gen battery for mobile devices

Google X labs working on next-gen battery for mobile devices
According to a story in Friday's Wall Street Journal, a small four person group inside Google X labs shifted in 2013 from testing third party batteries, to looking at new technologies that Google could use itself on devices like smartphones, wearables, tablets and more. The group, led by former Apple battery expert Dr. Ramesh Bhardwaj, was originally formed back in 2012. 

One concept that Google is working on is a flexible solid-state battery similar to the project that Dyson recently invested $15 million in. These batteries replace liquid chemicals with a solid that current is transmitted over. This would lead to smaller and safer batteries that could be produced in thin layers, making them perfect for mobile and wearable devices. 

The solid state batteries that Google is working on could also be used to power flexible products and would even be implantable in the human body. For Google Glass, these batteries could power a feature like video, which uses plenty of battery power. For Google's blood glucose measuring contact lens, these batteries could provide safer power that is non-flammable.

Other tech giants are also working on tomorrow's new batteries. Whichever one is first with a longer lasting, affordable, safer and smaller replacement to the current lithium-ion cells in use today, will have a huge advantage over other consumer tech companies. Back in 2013, Google CEO Larry Page said that battery life for mobile devices is a "huge issue" that has the "real potential to invent new and better experiences." Two years later, we are probably just a tad closer to a solution for this issue.

source: WSJ

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12 Comments

1. kaikuheadhunterz

Posts: 1157; Member since: Jul 18, 2013

"New battery technology found in smartphones right now" Said no website ever

3. brunelian92

Posts: 79; Member since: Feb 04, 2015

Battery technology is usually delayed or even stopped from entering the market because of manufaturing issues. If the manufacturing method, such as nano coatings, and low yield due to defective part, increase cost dramatically then it will never reach the market without heavy investment.

7. vincelongman

Posts: 5653; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

This us true unfortunately As much as I want new battery tech, rushing untested battery tech could be disastrous for OEMs Just Google exploding batteries for an idea of what I mean

9. wargreymon

Posts: 764; Member since: Nov 05, 2013

Don't forget oil giants buying and burying projects because it could be implemented in cars. Not everyone is for new technology sadly, and I wonder how far ahead we would be if no one tried to stop it.

10. brunelian92

Posts: 79; Member since: Feb 04, 2015

Please keep your conspiracy theories to yourself. As a person who works in a research field, I can assure you thata a load of crap. Most people researching this technology are not doing it to make money. They do it for passion and the bettering of man kind. Most people just find it easy to blame the guys that make a lot of money.

2. Antimio

Posts: 313; Member since: Nov 11, 2013

It was expected. I'm hoping every single company is doing the same. Battery is one of the main issues plaguing phones, and with new technology being even smaller (smartwatches) all efforts should be to improve not only battery capacity but duration as well.

4. JohnK

Posts: 117; Member since: Mar 03, 2015

An Apple battery expert is leading it, well... maybe it's too soon to start talking about this, give them a decade or 2.

5. BattleBrat

Posts: 1476; Member since: Oct 26, 2011

ZING!

6. kevin91202

Posts: 642; Member since: Jun 08, 2014

"According to a story in Friday's Wall Street Journal, a small four person group inside Google X labs shifted in 2013 from testing third party batteries, to looking at new technologies that Google could use itself on devices like smartphones, wearables, tablets and more." -PA (Alan F.) Commas, commas, and more commas. Do PA writers get paid more for adding unnecessary and grammatically incorrect commas? This is why nobody takes PA seriously: the inability to publish grammatically correct articles.

8. LikeMyself

Posts: 631; Member since: Sep 23, 2013

Seriously???

11. PootisMan

Posts: 266; Member since: Aug 02, 2013

Just get over it.

12. AlikMalix unregistered

Kevin, do you get paid, for counting, commas? This is, a tech site - the means, to get info across..,..,.,,,, Who, the hell, cares. Besides given, that most of these, guys, aren't from, English speaking, countries - the, writing, is, pretty, damn, good! And just in case you need a bonus this Christmas ,,,,, ,,,, ,, ,,,,,, ,,, ,,,, ,,,, ,,, .... You're welcome.

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