DoT may allow phone calls on flights, are you on board? (poll results)

DoT may allow phone calls on flights, are you on board? (poll results)
Тhe US Department of Transportation and aviation experts will be taking passenger input as part of the discussion process on the way to a final decision whether to lift the in-flight phone calls ban or not. That is why we asked you last week whether you consider this a good idea, and just 27% of our respondents say it's no biggie, while the rest are either accommodatingly or firmly against the initiative. Food for thought, DoT.

The Department of Transportation considers waiving its restrictions on in-flight phone calls, and is looking for industry, as well as passenger input on the matter. Needless to say, it will be left up to the airline, and even up to the particular flight in more granular detail to decide whether they will lift the ban on airborne calls, plus there will have to be an announcement before take-off whether that flight permits calls.

Even then, it might take many months and even a year or two until the process of lifting call restrictions is complete, but, still, the reactions are pretty telling. Comments range from the level-headed "I'll have to invest in noise cancelling headphones" through the realistic "you'll have to listen to..."We're about to land...Were flying over our neighborhood... Can you see me waving?" to the more ominous "You are stuck in an aluminum tube 5 miles above the earth listening to an a**hole for 5 hours." 

US Department of Transportation may allow phone calls on flights, are you on board?

Not worried, who talks instead of chats these days
27.37%
I hope the ban stays in place, or I'm noise-canceling it all
21.85%
Noooooo
50.77%

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7 Comments

1. FlySheikh

Posts: 443; Member since: Oct 02, 2015

No! I like the plane mostly silent not rowdy like a marketplace.

2. trojan_horse

Posts: 5868; Member since: May 06, 2016

Option 3 for me: Nooooo, I'm not onboard. Shouldn't the aircraft be quiet, and without noise? So no, just NO.

5. j_grouchy

Posts: 163; Member since: Nov 08, 2016

Wow...show me where these "quiet aircraft" are...those without noise...and I'll definitely buy a ticket!

3. lyndon420

Posts: 6452; Member since: Jul 11, 2012

Thank goodness I don't fly often. I think texting and access to 911 should be good enough to start with...start small and go from there.

4. Tanii

Posts: 132; Member since: Apr 30, 2015

I am against it :( it'll create lots of noise, I can't sleep even though when I'm tired in coach or ven due to noise created by people :( flights should be noise free. Texting should allowed (in case it's not allowed yet).

6. Modest_Moze

Posts: 184; Member since: Mar 23, 2015

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

7. schultzter

Posts: 16; Member since: Oct 20, 2015

1st of all, who's ever been on a quiet flight? Alone in a glider maybe, but on a plane with motors and AC and food carts and a hundred other breathing, rustling, munching, chatting people?! One more noise isn't going to make a difference. It might even be entertaining!!! 2nd of all, this is not mobile phone calls, this is for wi-fi calling!!! And probably not your carrier's wi-fi calling or your favourite chat or SIP client. Most likely you will have to install the airline's wi-fi calling client, with invasive permissions and horrible functionality (if your phone is even supported). Every second question to the stewardess will be for tech support and they'll be grumpy as hell by the end of flight. The pre-flight safety message will probably now include "and if you don't know how to use your phone the flight attendants can't help you - they're only here to distribute cardboard based snacks and over-priced drinks." And no one said it would be free either!!! Remember, this is airlines we're talking about!!!

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