BlackBerry's shares moving to the New York Stock Exchange on October 16th

BlackBerry's shares moving to the New York Stock Exchange on October 16th
In what can be interpreted as another sign of BlackBerry's turnaround, the company announced today that it is moving the listing of the company's shares from NASDAQ to the New York Stock Exchange. The switch will take place on October 16th and the company's symbol will change from the current BBRY to BB. This should make BlackBerry more visible to the investor community.

The announcement comes days after BlackBerry reported a net profit of 5 cents a share for its fiscal second quarter. Unlike the company's glory days, the company no longer manufactures handsets. Instead, BlackBerry licenses the BlackBerry Secure version of the Android operating system, its name, logo, and proprietary applications to phone makers like China's TCL and Indonesia’s BB Merah Putih. In return, BlackBerry receives royalty payments from these firms. In addition, BlackBerry sells software to auto manufacturers and others.

BlackBerry originally went public as part of Research In Motion back on October 28th, 1997. When the BlackBerry two-way pager became a must-have among executives and sales personnel, the stock started rising. Taking into account past stock splits, the shares peaked at $147.50 (the equivalent of $885 before stock splits) on June 23rd, 2008. From that point on, the shares continued a free fall. By 2013, the stock price had dropped to $5. Earlier that year, with the debut of the BlackBerry 10 OS, the company changed its name from Research in Motion to BlackBerry. The ticker symbol was revised from RIMM to the current BBRY.


Anyone who purchased the stock when things looked bleak back in 2013, is now sitting with a nice profit as the stock is currently trading over $11 a share.

The rise and fall of BlackBerry

The rise and fall of BlackBerry


source: BlackBerry

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38 Comments

1. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Blackberry is turning themselves around completely via software. They are perfect for software, but hardware is another story.

2. Crispin_Gatieza

Posts: 3089; Member since: Jan 23, 2014

Their foot's in the door and the name is slowly returning to prominence. It's a shame HP jettisoned the Palm/webOS brand to LG instead of developing the software properly and ditching the horrible handsets that nobody missed. With few exceptions (Passport, Z30 & Bold) BlackBerry had some forgettable hardware (Storm anyone?).

3. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Don't forget the Priv because it seems like that one has been forgotten as well.

7. Crispin_Gatieza

Posts: 3089; Member since: Jan 23, 2014

Even though I never personally experienced it, the Priv is another one of those devices that suffered from the dreaded double-typing. I've read many user complaints about it so I'll give them the benefit of the doubt. The Q10 was absolutely horrible in this respect and the Classic did do it to me more than once. For this reason I left the Priv off the list of recent stellar devices.

9. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

It suffered a lot of things from my understanding from consumer feedback and some indirect experience. I wouldn't call it a stellar device, more like a test of a new platform. Just my two cents on the matter.

5. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Exactly, Crispin. BlackBerry has proven that a company can be reinvented and become successful again. A whole lot of people wrote then off for dead (even people who have commented here), but BlackBerry has proven otherwise.

4. PhoneInQuestion

Posts: 496; Member since: Aug 20, 2017

Holy crap, what a good year for BB.

6. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Awesome news. BlackBerry has been having a great run of things as of late. Kudos to Chen and company for doing such a great job.

8. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

The question to ask is this a slow resurgence or a beating of a very dead horse?

10. Crispin_Gatieza

Posts: 3089; Member since: Jan 23, 2014

I wouldn't call it a resurgence. They've always been known for industry-leading Enterprise software solutions. They're just doing it with Android which was unheard of just a few years ago. Their QNX offerings are getting a 2nd look as well due to their "resurgence". Couple that with Microsoft punting on mobile (for Enterprise) with first and goal from the 2-yard line and you have the makings of a mobile software juggernaut. For their core constituency, not your average consumer who only cares about emojis and live pictures.

11. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Exactly, Crispin. BlackBerry's software has always been top notch, and aimed at a specific set of clientele. This is something that's always been evident, if one has actual knowledge of BlackBerry beyond handsets.

14. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Sometimes it's hard to look past something that is associated with a brand name, blackberry and the blackberry handsets. I think most smartphone users that follow the market more than the average user are probably aware of blackberry and their software offerings if they are familiar with the likes of Palm and Nokia from back in the day.

16. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

It shouldn't be hard if it's something that's been explained numerous times, is a verifiable fact, and has been in the news ever since they have left the smartphone hardware market last year. This was a huge deal. Most smartphone users don't even know the difference between which Android smartphone that they are using. For example, most don't know the difference between the Galaxy J and the Galaxy S line. Most don't know whether the iPhone can send a file via Bluetooth to a non Apple product or not. So no, most are not aware of BlackBerry's software offerings. You're referring to the Geeks and Nerds and tech enthusiasts, and that number is extremely small.

19. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

I think you're maybe going about it the wrong way. I'm not saying that it isn't common knowledge or an unverifiable fact. Like Samsung for instance. When you think of Samsung, you think of the Galaxy and Note phones, but truth be told, Samsung has business in many different segments such as the oil and medical industry. Depends on which users you are referring to, the average joe or the educated smartphone user. In any case, I blame the manufacturer for not being able to differentiate their different products. Uh I'm not sure what that has to do with anything, but OK? I think most Apple smartphone users probably won't care about that particular feature. When I say most, I mean the very ones you named, and that number isn't entirely small.

22. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Actually, I’m going about it the correct way. BlackBerry is no longer a handset maker, and that’s literally been drilled into readers heads on several sites, and was even on the news. Being that this information has been so thoroughly disseminated through several media outlets, it should be easy to understand. You said “most smartphone users....”. Most smartphone users are the “average joe/Josephine”. I don’t blame the manufacturer, I blame the user for not even attempting to do their due diligence. It’s pretty easy to distinguish between a Galaxy Note and a Galaxy J. And if you don’t know, then you really shouldn’t be using it, IMO. I was making a point to further back up what I was saying about the lack of knowledge of “most Smartphone users”. It’s not about whether they care or not, it’s the fact that they don’t even know to begin with.

27. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Again, I understand that. What I am trying to say is that in some people's minds, they will associate a particular brand with a particular product. It's not anything bad or negative. It's just something that's common. That's all I am trying to say. I think that's a particular ignorant thing to say. Obviously, most people can probably tell the difference between the Note and the Galaxy J. I don't think it's fair to pin all of the blame on the user if the manufacturer isn't doing their job to get the message out to the consumers or if they are putting too many eggs in one basket. I think that's just an assumption. I was making a point that most educated smartphone users are probably aware of the subject in question.

32. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

And what I’m saying is, people should associate the brand with what they do in the proper context. That’s all I’m saying. How is it ignorant? I responded to you based on how you worded it. And I can almost guarantee that most average consumers don’t know the difference between flagship and mid tier Samsung devices, or those types of devices from many other OEM’s, like LG. I think it’s absolutely fair to blame the user, because why on earth would you buy something and you don’t even know what it is or what it’s fully capable of? The OEM’s are doing their part to distinguish between their handsets via specs, advertising, build quality (although, the latter is being blurred as of late). I made no assumptions. You’re making an assumption that I made one. You didn’t initially say most “educated” smartphone users, you said “most smartphone users”. I responded based on what you initially said.

37. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Perhaps we should just agree to disagree? Clearly we aren't going to convince each other to change our minds from our perspective points. And for the record, I wasn't trying to make assumptions.

15. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Couldn't have said it any better. I think it's great that they are able to capitalize off their software offerings and keep themselves in the game.

12. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

I think the real question is "how are you been, mxyzptlk/flash/mxyzptlkZ/Wario/Wario2/Alphageek2?" At this point, it's pretty obvious to spot your new accounts, lol.

13. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

??? You talking to me or Crispin?

17. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Why would I say that to Crispin?

18. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

Why would you say it to me?

20. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Because that’s who you are.

21. PhoneInQuestion

Posts: 496; Member since: Aug 20, 2017

These Blackberry article comment sections are now the "weird parts" of PA...

23. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Lol, I know. I was just asking him how he was doing, and making him aware that it’s pretty obvious who he really is.

25. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

I don't think that's what you were doing because you started dropping names that I am not even familiar with.

28. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

I merely mentioned the names you’ve gone by. That’s all.

30. Spigen

Posts: 21; Member since: Oct 03, 2017

I'm sorry, but I don't know what you are talking about. Perhaps you should consider staying on the subject at hand.

34. meanestgenius

Posts: 21353; Member since: May 28, 2014

Lol, this is the subject at hand. But I’m done with the back and forth. I’m just going to patiently wait for the mods now.

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