Best Buy stops selling overpriced iPhone X units after customer backlash

Best Buy stops selling overpriced iPhone X units after customer backlash

Best Buy announced last week that it will sell the iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus devices at a higher price, but didn't exactly specify why. Customers who would buy either the three Apple smartphones mentioned would be charged an extra $100 when paying the full price upfront.

Well, that's not the case anymore since Best Buy announced that it had to halt the sales of iPhone X and iPhone 8 after customers complained about the $100 premium charge. However, the US retailers continue to sell Apple's iPhones, but only via carrier installment plans.

In a short statement, Best Buy said that even though there was clearly a high demand for the unlocked iPhone X, it has decided to stop selling it for a higher price because it would basically affect the company's image.


Initially, Best Buy claimed that the $100 premium charge was intentional since offering different purchasing options for the iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus “has a cost.” Well, I guess that didn't work so well in the end.

source: Bloomberg

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iPhone X
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  • Camera 12 MP / 7 MP front
  • Processor Apple A11 Bionic, Hexa-core, 2390 MHz
  • Storage 256 GB
  • Battery 2716 mAh(21h 3G talk time)

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37 Comments

2. Kibzara

Posts: 120; Member since: Feb 24, 2016

lol, this whole iPhone X fiasco is turning into a circus...

4. palmguy

Posts: 955; Member since: Mar 22, 2011

Funny!!! Also if you have to have payments for a freaking mobile phone, you can't afford or need a phone. The borrower is a slave to the loaner.

7. You_Dont_Say

Posts: 431; Member since: Jan 26, 2015

ROFL not true. It's smarter to utilize a loan with 0% interest than to pay everything upfront.

13. Awalker

Posts: 1958; Member since: Aug 15, 2013

Yeah, why would you pay full price if you can get 0% financing?

14. palmguy

Posts: 955; Member since: Mar 22, 2011

If you have to finance anything you can't afford it. 0% doesn't matter. When you give your hard earned(that you could be using to build wealth) income to a bank you don't have it anymore. I like toys also. But if it ties my money up, I don't need it.

15. tedkord

Posts: 17094; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

It's not about having to finance, it's just good sense to finance at 0% versus paying all up front. You can keep the balance in an interest bearing account.

17. BuffaloSouce

Posts: 1175; Member since: May 01, 2017

Saying financing something means you can’t afford it is beyond stupid especially when it comes to phones. Depending on what deals are going on, someone can do monthly installments, pay that sh!t off anytime and save a couple hundred off retail price. It sounds like you’re the one who’s having trouble keeping their money up to where you can’t afford something and projecting your problems on everyone else

20. Awalker

Posts: 1958; Member since: Aug 15, 2013

I can assure you that I can afford a $1000 phone but if financing is available I would choose that option. There is no downside to it.

23. VZWuser76

Posts: 4974; Member since: Mar 04, 2010

So at that rate, you can't finance your home, car, medical bills, etc. And you can't rent or lease either, because you'd be beholden to someone just the same. So if you believe what you say and follow it, then you're either independently wealthy and can afford any and everything, or you live in a cardboard box and are using some public computer your to post your comments. I'm gonna go with the latter.

24. sissy246

Posts: 6959; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

What about you car and ypur house, are they financed. Guess you shouldn't have bought them. I bet ypu are also paying finance charges on them, now how stupid was that.

32. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

SO that means you are either a millionaire or you don't; own a car or a home. Got it. FYI. Rich people even millionaires don't pay cash for everything. If I buy a home, the chances of me having $200K in cash is very slim unless I save my income for a couple years. But why wait when I can go to a bank and get a loan and just pay 20% and move right in? And if I want too I can stil pay it off in 2 years or I can take all 5/7/15 if I want? If you have a car payment, home mortgage or any credit card, then you are a hypocrite and should just be quiet. According to you, you can't afford those things so you should give them back.

36. Roboric

Posts: 3; Member since: Jun 27, 2017

I don't think you fully understand/appreciate the time value of money. Financing a phone has nothing to do with not being able to "afford it". But hey you stick with your Palms.

37. el33t626

Posts: 28; Member since: Dec 18, 2013

says the guy still rocking a Palm trio XD !

30. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Because not everyone wants to pay for a phone over time. Also so they can be able to sell it right away as a unlocked phone will sell faster than a locked one. Does Apple charge more to buy a phone carrier unlocked? My experience is 3rd party sellers do for sure and I know Samsung does.

31. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

False. So I guess because you make monthly payments on a car that means you can't afford it? I guess mortagage payments means you cn't afford a house too. Right? You sir win the most stupid post of the day. First off, not everyone wants to pay $1000 upfront for a phone. Also 0% on 24 payments is cheaper than putting the whole $1000 on a credit card that isn't an AMEX Gold. Also, if I only had $1000 in my pocket and I want the phone and other things too, why should I put all $1000 on one purchase? Have you ever purchased anything on credit? If so then you are a hypocrite because that means you can't afford it according to you. What a dummy! When you "ACTUALLY" can't afford something, monthly payments won't make it any more affordable if you still don't have the money. The point of monthly payment is making it easy to pay. It doesn't mean you can't afford it. OMG!!!!! STUUUUUPIDDD!

33. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Here is what makes phone financing awesome. One, I can get a new phone every year and will only need to pay %0% the cost of the phone, as long as when I bring back the device to trade its in 100% good condition, which they always are. That means my rate on the return will not be less than 50%. If you buy a phone outright and then use it to trade next year for another phone, you won't get 50% of its value. Many live from check to check. They can't spend $1000 on to many things ay any one given time. So an example. A person with a $4000 a month salary could afford this phone, as long as their monthly expenses are not ,ore than 1/3 of their income. But just because I can pay $1000 in cash, doesn't mean its smart. One issue is, example, the Note 8 is $930 this year. When you sell it next year, if you. get $500 for it, you will be very lucky. The chances of getting more than 50% are slim. 0% is lower than any rate on any credit card, because no one has a 0% interest credit card. Banks will give you zero percent as a promo on purchases, but they usually don't last more than 12 months in most cases. I know because I worked for Citicards. I use to pay cash for phones and stopped in 2013 because its just not feasible. I buy a new phone sometimes 3 times in one year. So if I buy 3 phones, and I pay cash, in 3 months, my experience is, its not so easy to sell a $800 in 3 months for $700. It can be done, but I said it isn't easy. If you have a credit card (not debit card) and you go to McDonald's and but 10.00 in food and you don't pay the bill off within 30 days, then paying 20% interested on a hamburger is kinda dumb, but still no big deal. But 0% over 24 is wayyyy better than $1000 upfront. If you don't think so, then its OK. But if you have and credit card or loan on any purchase, you are a hypocrite. Or you must be under the age of 18 and you are jealous because you aren't even old enough to make the purchase unless you have cash.

8. truthbetold

Posts: 42; Member since: Oct 16, 2015

That's the way execs think in big business - if someone doesn't mind dropping $1000+ in cash for a smartphone, why should they care about giving $100 atop of that? It's the same line of thinking car dealers use when they charge you for extras and color options. They tried to rake in some quick profit, but they got called out on it and failed. They'll learn from it and try something less obviously dirty next time around.

34. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

No it is not the same. The extra $100 isn't giving you any benefit. That is the issue. The retailer is trying to make extra, because you paid cash. Best Buy gets paid commissions by carriers for activation they get in the store. Because how else will they make any money? Best Buy buys the phone from Apple, just as carriers do. So if you buy the phone, Best Buy is only getting their original money back. Now I don't know what carriers and retailers pay for a devices vs its retail price. I am assuming they pay full price, because they only charge you full price. When you choose a payment plan, they give you a discount only because they get the money from other means. Like Data Plans. When carrier use to give you an iPhone that costs $650 for $199, it is because they subsidized the cost for you and rolled the rest up into your plan (data charge). Which is why if you cancelled early you had to pay a certain fee which lowered each month you had the phone. That fee what usually the balnce of the phone price. But they lose money that way because, if you leave, you just pay a fee. Many times it was less than what you really owed on the phone. Example. Buy a phone for $650. Cancel service 60 days later. Pay an ETF (early termination fee) of $375. So they lost month. You paid 199 + the 375 fee. Still less than $650 Now you can leave but you must pay the full retail cost or whats left. If you buy a phone cash, they don't get the commission, so they gain nothing from the sale.

11. SIGPRO

Posts: 2810; Member since: Oct 03, 2012

X most crappy overpriced behind the market phone!

12. skymitch89

Posts: 1451; Member since: Nov 05, 2010

It's called an MSRP for a reason, and most people are smart enough to pay no more than that, even if that MSRP is way above what it should be. Those that are even smarter would take advantage of special offers that are offered through carriers.

21. MobileNico

Posts: 94; Member since: Aug 26, 2012

Best Buy's been doing this with unactivated iPhones for years. The real reason they do it is they make zero profit on them selling them outright (source: I quit Best Buy Mobile two wks ago) and only make money through installment billing because of a kickback from the carriers. I'm surprised they finally caved to customer complaints.

26. BuffaloSouce

Posts: 1175; Member since: May 01, 2017

That’s why I always check to see if there’s any deals on the phone I’m interested in. I’d rather pay so and so every month and save a couple hundred at the end instead of shelling out full retail price or in Best Buys case, be overcharged. I laugh and those people who’ll sit there and believe installment billing is an instant scam

29. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

I never understood why the unlocked phone cost more. Same phone, same hardware, simply isn't locked to a specific carriers. That seems wrong on all levels. Carriers don't charge you more if you pay cash for a phone, or even if you use monthly payments and by law, once you've paid for the phone, it must be unlocked if you want it to be. I remember when carriers charged to unlock a phone you own. That was BS. They don't anymore.

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