After the N1 tablet, should Nokia also make an Android phone?

When Nokia announced that it would sell its Devices and Services unit to Microsoft, it was pretty clear that the company would completely give up on manufacturing and selling mobile devices. However, it turned out that what’s left of Nokia didn’t really abandon the idea of being a gadget maker. Last month, the Finnish company announced the N1, its very first Android tablet.

While the Nokia N1 looks a bit too much like an iPad mini, customers are really excited about it. And for a good reason: this is a high-end, aluminum-made Android Lollipop tablet that will cost just $249.

Seeing that Nokia isn’t afraid to experiment, we were wondering: should the company also want to make Android smartphones? And by that we don’t mean handsets like those included in the Nokia X line (which can hardly be considered Android devices anyway, since they only promote Microsoft apps and services), but something similar to the N1 slate: high-end Lollipop smartphones with accessible prices.

It should be noted that, following its deal with Microsoft, Nokia isn't allowed to commercialize phones under its own name - not for 30 months after the deal was signed. But it will be able to do it once this agreement expires. So, what do you think? Should Nokia someday consider testing the waters with a true Android smartphone? Cast your votes in the poll below.

P.S.: the Nokia smartphone pictured above isn’t real, it’s a concept design from DeviantArt.

Should Nokia try to make an Android phone?

Yes. The result could be very interesting.
95.46%
No, I don't think it would be a good idea.
4.54%

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