Introduction


The super-slim, 0.19" (4.85mm) Oppo R5 was announced at the end of October and was quickly proclaimed the thinnest smartphone in the world - an impressively elegant handset, obviously meant to please users who place aesthetics as a top factor when picking a smartphone. To round off the package, Oppo equipped the R5 with a 64-bit Snapdragon 615, 2 GB of RAM, and a generous 13 MP / 5 MP camera sensor combo.

So how does this combo of elegance and top-of-the-midrange hardware work? Let's check it out!

Design

A delicate smartphone for the style-conscious

There is no denying that the Oppo R5 is a pleasure to look at. The manufacturer did not rely just on the slim profile for aesthetics, but on a beautifully crafted matte silver-finished metal frame and back, intertwined with the white, non-glossy plastic bezels. Indeed, the R5 looks and feels like a well-built, premium handset; despite its thickness, it is absolutely sturdy, with no bends and creaks. As every slim handset to come out these days, this one also has a protruding camera on the back, though, it is housed in a nicely looking, rectangular bulge, so as long as one is used to this "feature" on modern smartphones, it will be a non-issue.

Measuring at 5.86 x 2.93 x 0.19 inches (148.9 x 74.5 x 4.85 mm) and weighing 5.47 oz (155 g), the R5 does not feel very different to hold, compared to other top-line handsets in the market – its footprint is familiar to the hand, and, while the slender profile does make it feel less bulky, the device still weighs just about the same as other, more traditional phones. Accessing the power button and volume rocker is easy, as both are placed in a comfortable spot on the right side of the frame, and while their feedback is not the best, they still feel clicky enough to not be awkward to use.

Due to the size constraints, Oppo was unable to pack a 3.5mm headphone jack on the device and hasn't equipped it with a dedicated speaker for audio – its earpiece doubles as a loudspeaker. The lack of these components actually contributes to the device's uniform look, as there are no excessive grilles or openings to disrupt its solid lines. Fear not, the phone comes with its own proprietary headset, which connects via micro USB.


OPPO R5

OPPO R5

Dimensions

5.86 x 2.93 x 0.19 inches

148.9 x 74.5 x 4.85 mm

Weight

5.47 oz (155 g)

HTC Desire 820

HTC Desire 820

Dimensions

6.21 x 3.1 x 0.3 inches

157.7 x 78.74 x 7.74 mm

Weight

5.47 oz (155 g)

Xiaomi Mi 4

Xiaomi Mi 4

Dimensions

5.48 x 2.7 x 0.35 inches

139.2 x 68.5 x 8.9 mm

Weight

5.26 oz (149 g)

Apple iPhone 6

Apple iPhone 6

Dimensions

5.44 x 2.64 x 0.27 inches

138.1 x 67 x 6.9 mm

Weight

4.55 oz (129 g)

OPPO R5

OPPO R5

Dimensions

5.86 x 2.93 x 0.19 inches

148.9 x 74.5 x 4.85 mm

Weight

5.47 oz (155 g)

HTC Desire 820

HTC Desire 820

Dimensions

6.21 x 3.1 x 0.3 inches

157.7 x 78.74 x 7.74 mm

Weight

5.47 oz (155 g)

Xiaomi Mi 4

Xiaomi Mi 4

Dimensions

5.48 x 2.7 x 0.35 inches

139.2 x 68.5 x 8.9 mm

Weight

5.26 oz (149 g)

Apple iPhone 6

Apple iPhone 6

Dimensions

5.44 x 2.64 x 0.27 inches

138.1 x 67 x 6.9 mm

Weight

4.55 oz (129 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page


Display

Punchy and crisp, though, inaccurate

The Oppo R5 has a 5.2" display with a 1080 x 1920 resolution, which results in a 424 ppi density, giving us a clear and crisp image. The panel uses AMOLED technology, which results in vivid, punchy, though, also – rather inaccurate colors. Its brightness levels range between a minimum of 2 nits, to a maximum of 339, making it comfortable to view in pitch-darkness, but troublesome when out in the sun.

The display's color temperature measures at 8011 K, quite a ways off from the reference value of 6,500 K. That, combined with an apparently skewed color reproduction, results in the picture looking cold, with a bluish/greenish tint visible throughout. The typical for AMOLED screens color over-saturation is also present here.



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16 Comments

1. SuperAndroidEvo

Posts: 4888; Member since: Apr 15, 2011

B U S T E D !

2. hafini_27

Posts: 951; Member since: Oct 31, 2013

Too thin was never an option.

3. Pattyface

Posts: 1658; Member since: Aug 20, 2014

The idea that you have to use a mini USB for the headphone jack is absurd. Also the protruding camera is a sign that it's too thin.

4. DeusExCellula

Posts: 1390; Member since: Oct 05, 2014

Super Slim is not a Pro its a con..

5. vuyonc

Posts: 1091; Member since: Feb 24, 2014

Oppo, you are so much better than this.

6. Symon_Fleece

Posts: 351; Member since: May 30, 2014

6.5 score Hmmm it's a bit ...

7. Funmap

Posts: 5; Member since: Dec 16, 2014

Clearly this review must have been the work of some Oppo hater. Good camera, amazing design and built quality, no word about what is in the box (free cover, right now you even get an external power bank for free). Yes, there are trade-offs (battery life, no expansion slot, 3.5 mm headphone jack), but there are people (like me) who are willing to compromise e.g. only use Blutooth headsetss, so I feel the phone should also be judged for what it is, an amzing piece of design work. Looking at the N3 review, I cannot help but think that Oppo is not reviewed fairly on PA.

8. alexvv

Posts: 165; Member since: Oct 16, 2013

You are not entirely wrong, but think for a moment that it costs almost double a g2 costs at the moment. Design, camera, feel, construction and soc are all fine but i think i would be too frustrated to live with the absence of a 3.5mm jack. And the storage is too low.

9. paul.k

Posts: 297; Member since: Jul 17, 2014

While it is a well-built, good looking, and strikingly thin phone, the fact remains that it performs badly in four main areas - sound, display, call quality, and battery life. Keeping its rather hefty price-tag in mind - these flaws brought its score down to what you see in the review.

15. TerryTerius unregistered

11.5 gigs of non expandable storage A highly inaccurate and dim screen No headphone jack No NFC Muffled & distorted call quality Short Battery life $600 - $800 You honestly think a phone with all those shortcomings is equal to the similarly priced Sony Xperia Z3/Z4, LG G3, Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC One, iPhone 6 or Galaxy Note 4? That score is more than fair. The same amount of money will get you a better phone with literally none of those shortcomings. I could understand if this phone was $300 or so. But it isn't. And asking flagship money without flagship kit isn't a strong selling point for 99% of people.

10. Funmap

Posts: 5; Member since: Dec 16, 2014

Sorry, I disagree on a few points - not on battery life though: - Display: In other reviews they seem to really like the display. - I paid 359 Euro (they seem to have a special extra discount at the moment) incl. shipping and the VOOC POWERBANK, whereas the price for a new LG G2 is around 300 Euro, so the difference is not too big. - Storage: Yes, it is great to be able to expand by up to 128 GB, but how much do you actually use? My current phone as 32 GB internal storage of which 23 are still available. - 3.5 mm headjack - I think this depends on personal taste - for some it may be a deal breaker, but I have been using only BT headsets for years. - Finally, battery life, which definitely could be better, but this is the price you pay for such slim waistline I suspect.

16. TerryTerius unregistered

1. The average person will use up 11 gigs of storage in no time. Between music, videos, apps & photos that will vanish ridiculously fast. That simply isn't enough for 90% of consumers. 2. It wasn't about personal taste about liking the display, it was about it being inaccurate. Whether one likes that or not is subjective, but objectively it is off the mark. 3. You're paying flagship money for a phone that doesn't even have the same features, specs or capabilities as its competitors of last year, let alone the current generation. In other words it has a handful of shortcomings and absolutely no advantage except for its thinness for the same price as more complete and fully featured phones.

11. MickLuvHP

Posts: 23; Member since: Oct 26, 2011

I just find that the absent of 3.5mm headphone jack is just too weird. I believe the other area like sound , call quality isn't a big issue , display is subjective to personal preference , battery life is kinda like iPhone 6 , which to me is okay after getting used to it . Though i believe the main issue is the 16GB & 3.5mm jack , if they include a 3.5mm jack & at least 32 GB internal memory will make the device sell more! As I believe alot of people are willing to pay for a slim phone with nice design and do not need super good specs.

12. greenelektron

Posts: 537; Member since: Sep 10, 2014

Design fail. Nope nope nope.

13. Moose

Posts: 418; Member since: Jan 05, 2015

Battery is way too weak. Slim may look good but who wants a battery that needs charging 3 times a day.

14. Funmap

Posts: 5; Member since: Dec 16, 2014

Does anbody of you actually own the phone. I do and with normal use - some calls, regular mail checking, LT/WiFi on, Bluetooth audio on for a couple of hourse, full screen brightness, some pictures etc. and the phone easily gets me through the day - and then again, I get it charged to 50% in 15 minutes. I use the headset adapter or Bluetooth audio and it works well. On the other hand - all my colleagues, especially iPhone users, Marvel about the phone and say, that is the first Android they like, but hey, they are used to shorter battery life and no expandable storage :-)
R5
  • Display 5.2" 1080 x 1920 pixels
  • Camera 13 MP / 5 MP front
  • Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 615, Octa-core, 1500 MHz
  • Storage 16 GB
  • Battery 2000 mAh

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