Samsung Galaxy Note5 Q&A: your questions get answered

It's been merely a few days after Samsung unveiled its newest top-tier devices, the Samsung Galaxy Note5 and the S6 edge+. The newest superphones in town pair powerful hardware with exterior design to die for, which creates a pretty enticing package. They are powerful, they are good-looking, and they are already available for pre-order and will ship on August 21 for all those who have decided that they're worth the money Samsung is asking for them.

Our review of the Galaxy Note5 is already here: we commended Samsung for the design, screen-to-body size ratio, camera to die for, the fast charging, and the surprisingly good battery life. Still, we feel like Samsung could have done a better job in certain aspects: while its the missing removable battery, microSD card slot, and IR blaster, it's also a fingerprint magnet that has an odd-sounding internal speaker.

As we might have left a number of not-so-important questions unanswered, we decided to let you ask us anything you wanted to know about the new Galaxy Note5. You embraced the idea and quickly came up with some rather interesting questions. These will be answered right now!


We are mostly content with the Note5's audio-reproduction qualities. True, the headphone jacks provides higher voltage output than the one on the Note 4 and this is clearly perceptible. Although it largely depends on the headphones you'll use, the ones that come along with the headset are pretty decent. Even at loud volume levels, audio remains clear and with a high level fidelity. Additionally, Samsung has thrown in a host of audio-centric features that enable you to finely tune a whole lot of things. In general, we feel like the Note5 is better than the Note 4, all things considered. 


Right from the get-go, the user has close to 24GB of storage available at hand.



The S Pen stylus of the Note5 is smoother and feels slick when handled, which makes it a bit uncomfortable to use for longer periods of time. The S Pen of the Note 4 has more grip because of its groove. 

 

All plastic.


Yes, if you don't care about the S Pen stylus. Otherwise, they are similar similar in terms of hardware, software, and performance. 


With apps, you can open up to 7 apps before the Note5 starts auto-refreshing them. With the web browser, we've been able to load 14 pages without the phone refreshing them.


There is no significant difference between the performance of the Note5 and the Galaxy S6; in fact, they perform very similar in real life. 

 

The rear camera of the Note5 uses a 1/2.6" Sony Exmor IMX 240 sensor. However, the 5MP front-facing camera uses a Samsung-made ISOCELL sensor.

As far as the UI performance of the Note5, it's mostly identical to the one you get with the iPhone 6 Plus.


So far, we are quite content with the front-facing camera on the Galaxy Note5. If the lighting is good, then you're in for some good-looking selfies! We also like that it's a wide-angle one, allowing you to squeeze in more people in the photo. It might not the very best around, but is definitely among the better ones.


A tough question. The Note 4 matches the Note5 on some levels, plus it's more versatile with the microSD card slot, IR blaster, and removable battery it flaunts. If these stand higher in your book than the improved performance and posh new design, then the Note 4 would be a better buy. Otherwise, go the Note5 way.

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Galaxy Note5
  • Display 5.7 inches 2560 x 1440 pixels
  • Camera 16 MP (Single camera) 5 MP front
  • Hardware Samsung Exynos 7 Octa 4GB RAM
  • Storage 64GB, not expandable
  • Battery 3000 mAh
  • OS Android 7.0 Nougat Samsung TouchWiz UI

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