Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750

Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Over the past few months, we have seen an influx of new smartphones come avaliable for Verizon Wireless, most notably those featuring the Android OS, and since the upcoming Windows Phone 7 platform is still half a year away from any consumer devices, most WinMo users may be asking "what about me?" The last WinMo phone that Verizon released was the Samsung Omnia II i920 near the end of '09, and even though it had a large AMOLED display, the device had noticeable menu lag and lacked a physical keyboard, which kept it from being a success with business professionals. Now comes the LG Fathom VS750.

Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750

Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750


The LG Fathom VS750 is the first WinMo smartphone that LG has designed for Verizon, just like the Ally VS740 is LG's first Android device for the carrier. The Fathom uses the stock Windows Mobile Professional 6.5.3 OS (no LG S-Class interface here), but it has a few Verizon extras, such as Visual Voice Mail, Mobile Email, City ID, Mobile IM, and VZ Navigator. All the menus and apps seem to run smoothly, thanks to the 1GHz processor the device is packing. The 3.2" 480x800 pixel WVGA touch-sensitive display uses resistive technology (not capacitive like the Ally), which means that it requires a firm press by your finger or the included stylus to get a response. There is also a 3.2MP autofocus camera, though it lacks an LED flash. The device overall is made out plastic and has a dark (very dark) blue color to it, but we found the LG Fathom to feel more durable and better constructed than the Samsung Omnia II.

Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750
Hands-on with the Verizon LG Fathom VS750


We also like that the LG Fathom comes equipped with a sliding 4-row QWERTY keyboard. It is designed slightly different than the keyboard on the Ally, as the Fathom's keys are a bit more square, aligned in perfect rows, and are flatter to the surface. Between the two, we like the keyboard on the Ally better as it feels more comfortable to use, but we are still glad to see one included on the Fathom, since the on-screen keyboard is almost useless.

So does the LG Fathom VS750 have what it takes to snatch up some potential smartphone buyers, or does it fall-short next to Android and Windows Phone 7?

Check back for our Full Review of the LG Fathom VS750!

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5 Comments

1. tuminatr

Posts: 1090; Member since: Feb 23, 2009

kind of a strange set of specs

2. K3N422

Posts: 10; Member since: Jun 25, 2009

I just want to know who was up at between 12am and 1am taking pictures of phones...

5. narley

Posts: 357; Member since: May 14, 2009

someone who gets paid money to do it....

3. testman22

Posts: 339; Member since: Nov 03, 2009

This seems like a pretty plain phone, but after playing it for awhile, I was very impressed at how easy it is to use. My biggest gripe with WinMo is that they are somewhat difficult to navigate and perform simple tasks. The Fathom has a great interface and will definitely appeal to people that need windows on their phone

4. narley

Posts: 357; Member since: May 14, 2009

pointless phone

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