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Wi-Fi bug affecting your HTC One X or HTC One S? Here's a solution

Wi-Fi bug affecting your HTC One X or HTC One S? Here's a solution
The HTC One X

The HTC One X

There is some word making the rounds that particular HTC One X and HTC One S units are having problems with Wi-Fi connectivity. Apparently, when the flawed units go idle, the Wi-Fi connection is broken and will not reconnect when the phone wakes up from its sleep. HTC does have a software fix coming as firmware version 1.28 for the HTC One X does not have the same problem with Wi-Fi. Until the fix is disseminated, there is a way that you can work around the bug by manually assigning an IP address on your Wi-Fi  network. By doing this instead of using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), you will be able to keep your Wi-Fi connection running even when the phone awakens from a beauty sleep.
  1. First, go to Settings > Wifi and tell your phone to disconnect from your network if you're already connected to it.
     
  2. Select your network once again from the list, and enter your password as usual.
     
  3. Tick "Show advanced options" and some extra options will appear. Select "IP settings" and choose "Static" instead of "DHCP."
     
  4. IP Address: The IP address you want to assign to your phone. This should normally be taken from the pool of IPs available for devices to claim via DHCP (check your router's admin page if in doubt). Usually something on the same subnet as your router will do. For example, if your router is 192.168.0.1, then 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254 should be good.
     
  5. Gateway: The IP address of your router, usually 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.254.
     
  6. Network prefix length: This is a different way of specifying your network's subnet mask (check a conversion table here). For most, the default "24" will work just fine.
     
  7. DNS1/DNS2: Your ISP's primary and secondary DNS servers. If you're not sure, you can always use Google's public DNS service by entering 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4, as we've done in our screenshots above.
     
  8. Click "Connect" and you should be good to go!

The site suggests that if you are still experiencing problems with your Wi-Fi connection after this workaround, go to advanced Wi-Fi setting and enable "Best Wi-Fi performance". If all of this doesn't work, check your settings and if everything checks out right, you just might have to wait for HTC to send out its firmware update. Or, you can just connect using your carrier's pipeline.

source: AndroidCentral

5 Comments
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posted on 17 Apr 2012, 00:18

1. AL_FHD (Posts: 1; Member since: 17 Apr 2012)


s_f_f_alajmi

posted on 17 Apr 2012, 04:44 1

2. Forsaken77 (Posts: 547; Member since: 09 Jun 2011)


Damn! What's with all the new phones having bad glitches lately? I think the manufacturers are rushing the product out the door before testing is properly concluded.

posted on 17 Apr 2012, 05:45

3. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5465; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


Agree!

posted on 17 Apr 2012, 09:23

4. Bangthering_007 (Posts: 36; Member since: 21 Feb 2012)


No they are opting for larger testing pool!!

posted on 07 May 2012, 11:51

5. OneXRule (Posts: 2; Member since: 07 May 2012)


Just restart your phone
Btw I write this comment after 5minutes solving this problem

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