Introduction


This year, we’ve seen a huge shift towards delivering ‘low-cost’ premium smartphones – you know, high-end spec’d things under the $500 threshold. Traditionally speaking, phones positioned in the upper end of the spectrum have been priced at around $600 at the very least, but with these two smartphones in this comparison, they’re radically redefining the expectations.

The Google Nexus 6P is undoubtedly impressive taking into account its premium metal design, which is unprecedented given the fact it’s attached with a starting cost of $499.00. Equally on the same pedestal, the Moto X Pure Edition comes at us with a highly customizable design at an even lower, $399.99 cost of ownership. Combining killer specs with price points that undercut the competition, it’ll be intriguing to find out exactly how they stack up against one another.

Design


Yet another testament to what can be achieved on such a strict budget, it’s almost unfathomable that they both have attractive and compelling designs. The Nexus 6P, in particular, is stunning looking and it’s the more premium one between the two – attributed to its originality, svelte profile, and aluminum construction. Yes, it’s considerably longer, but its sturdy feel in the hand can’t be matched by its rival.

While it’s thicker and slightly heavier, the Moto X Pure Edition offers a bit more flair with its highly customizable design. In fact, no other phone can compete with the diversity and color combinations that the Moto X Pure Edition offers via Moto Maker – the online portal that allows buyers to select various colors, finishes, and accents for the phone. And on top of that, the arch to its casing gives it a slightly more ergonomic feel in the hand.

We’ll certainly applaud the two for their solid efforts, showing that beautiful designs are obtainable even on a budget. If premium and sturdiness are more your forte, go with the Nexus 6P. However, if flair and style are what matters to you more, then the Moto X Pure Edition is the no-brainer selection.

The Google Nexus 6P’s main distinction, aside from its premium design, is the handy fingerprint sensor slapped on its back. Having it on board enables it for Android Pay, in addition to the added level of security it offers. As for the Moto X Pure Edition, it lacks the modern convenience of a fingerprint sensor, but it comes with a microSD slot for expandable storage.


Google Nexus 6P

Google Nexus 6P

Dimensions

6.27 x 3.06 x 0.29 inches

159.3 x 77.8 x 7.3 mm

Weight

6.28 oz (178 g)

Motorola Moto X Pure Edition (2015)

Motorola Moto X Pure Edition (2015)

Dimensions

6.06 x 3 x 0.44 inches

153.9 x 76.2 x 11.06 mm

Weight

6.31 oz (179 g)

Google Nexus 6P

Google Nexus 6P

Dimensions

6.27 x 3.06 x 0.29 inches

159.3 x 77.8 x 7.3 mm

Weight

6.28 oz (178 g)

Motorola Moto X Pure Edition (2015)

Motorola Moto X Pure Edition (2015)

Dimensions

6.06 x 3 x 0.44 inches

153.9 x 76.2 x 11.06 mm

Weight

6.31 oz (179 g)

To see the phones in real size or compare them with other models, visit our Visual Phone Size Comparison page



Display


They settle for nothing less than Quad-HD display! That’s certainly an impressive accomplishment considering how they undercut many other phones with their low lost, but it merely indicates that it’s obtainable. Details are no different with the two, since they’re both endowed with 5.7-inch panels, but the Moto X Pure Edition opts to go with IPS-LCD technology – while it’s AMOLED for the Nexus 6P.

On the surface, there shouldn’t be any complaints about the two. As we use them day-to-day, though, we notice some superiority to the Moto X Pure Edition's display. Not only is it significantly brighter at a staggering 715 nits, making it one of the brightest screens around, but it produces colors accurately in the sRGB color gamut chart.

In comparison, the Nexus 6P achieves a maximum luminance of 356 nits, which is far from its rivals’ output – making it tougher to view outdoors. At the same time, too, its color reproduction is skewed by its intense saturation on the default setting. That’s unless you tinker around with the developer settings to enable the sRGB color mode, which then gives the same accuracy as its competitor.

We’re mostly leaning toward the Moto X Pure Edition with this one, mainly because its potent brightness output is unmatched.



FEATURED VIDEO

19 Comments

1. Kumar123 unregistered

My two favorite android phone this year. Moto X style is really a compelling device with a killer price tag. If only they would go with FHD display and put a OIS in their camera that would make the moto X style even better. SD 808's gpu is definitely not great for running QHD display all the time and as a result Style feels hotter than other android device . My wish list for next year moto x style- 1. A custom made Sony sensor with OIS ( OIS is a must for next year phone) 2. Bigger battery than 3000mAh ( Come on moto X play has bigger battery than flagship moto x style which I find unacceptable) 3. A fingerprint scanner. ( Great one like iPhones/Nexuses not like Sony's inconsistent fingerprint scanner) 3. I know they are not going back to FHD but I really want they put FHD display instead of QHD for battery saving purpose. ( But unfortunately I know its not going to happen that's why I want bigger battery) 4. At least one version with full metal body. ( magnesium alloy body would be great) DO IT MOTO

2. Ajlal3

Posts: 23; Member since: Aug 03, 2012

Sonys fingerprint scanner is consistent. Dont listen to rumours

3. rubyonrails3

Posts: 375; Member since: Oct 01, 2014

Nexus 6p have better more reliable and consistent ;) and Apple iPhone 6s has THE best fingerprint scanner

4. Commentator

Posts: 3723; Member since: Aug 16, 2011

Get a (different) room, you two.

16. siduaoisud

Posts: 9; Member since: Nov 26, 2015

"Apple iPhone 6s has THE best fingerprint scanner" No, it does not. If you look at any comparison videos or any pure statistic the Nexus 6P has a superior fingerprint scanner. Not only that, but you do not have to wake the phone in order to use it.

8. TerryTerius unregistered

When multiple outlets reviewing the device say exactly the same thing, that's not exactly a rumor.

5. Arch_Fiend

Posts: 3951; Member since: Oct 03, 2015

Nexus 6P Hands Down. The Sd808 And QHD Just Doesn't Make Sense To Me.

11. combatmedic870

Posts: 986; Member since: Sep 02, 2015

The SD808 doesn't make sense. Why did they dumb down the GPU at all!?!?

13. Arch_Fiend

Posts: 3951; Member since: Oct 03, 2015

I Guess Because Qualcomm Though The 810 Would Be Amazing And That The 808 Would Mostly Be Put In Mid-High End Devices And Not Flagships. But Because Of The 810's Failure The 808 Got More Screen Time Than It Could Have Dreamed For.

14. VZWuser76

Posts: 4974; Member since: Mar 04, 2010

Agreed. If the 810 didn't have the early issues it did, the 808 would've been nothing more than a cheaper alternative to the 810. But since it did, OEMS saw it as the safer choice but at the cost of performance. Now that OEMS seem to have found a way to work around the 810's issues, it is the clearer choice of the two.

15. Arch_Fiend

Posts: 3951; Member since: Oct 03, 2015

Yep..

6. xq10xa

Posts: 810; Member since: Dec 07, 2010

"If premium and sturdiness are more your forte, go with the Nexus 6P." LOL, what the heck? Has the John V held the Nexus 6P? No way in hell is that thing sturdy. It's easily bent and some of the glass on the cameras have broken. The sensor gets permanently damaged if you block it. That's premium and sturdy?

7. VZWuser76

Posts: 4974; Member since: Mar 04, 2010

Have you? I actually have the phone, I've had it now for the last 3 weeks. It doesn't easily bend either. The guy in the video, who incidentally competes in strongman type competitions, you could see his fingers were white while bending the phone. That means it took significant effort, more than just casual wear and tear. As for the glass on the phone breaking, the numbers of those affected are in the single digits and we have no way to verify that they didn't break it themselves and just don't want to pay to fix it themselves. Yes, the laser autofocus can be damaged if it's blocked by a case. Tue same thing would happen if you blocked the laser autofocus on the LG G4. That's not a defect of the phone, but of an improperly designed case. Would you fault a device for having a bad proximity sensor if it's case covered the phone's sensor?

17. siduaoisud

Posts: 9; Member since: Nov 26, 2015

As VZW said, have you held it? It is sturdy. Do you even own one? I do. It's sturdy, has an excellent build, and the camera glass does not even have a scratch on it after two weeks of heavy usage. It has been sat on, been in pockets, and etc and it hasn't bent at all. It does not even have any scratches on it so what are you talking about? Permanently damaged? When you block a sensor it is blocked on any phone. It doesn't get damaged and the sensor is really accurate. Do you somehow think that your opinion is more valid than people who actually own the phone instead of getting their opinions from a fallacious YouTube video? You really are gullible. Two words: It's premium. You do not know what you're talking about.

9. Joshing4fun

Posts: 1245; Member since: Aug 13, 2010

Moto X unless you rather pay more just to have a metal phone.

10. VZWuser76

Posts: 4974; Member since: Mar 04, 2010

That, and a fingerprint scanner and guaranteed fast updates.

12. fitnesspro

Posts: 27; Member since: Mar 07, 2015

A biased article, which fails to compare the performance of the two phones, most likely because there is no comparison to be made. The NEXUS 6P is a premium phone far superior to the Moto with a fingerprint scanner unmatched by any other de device, including the iPhone 6+. Also no mention of the Pure Android advantage.

18. wonkman

Posts: 7; Member since: Dec 22, 2015

You're going to see a lot of fan boy endorsements for the 6P. It has an 810 which is modestly improved over the previous 810 and a "gee wizz" finger print scanner. It also has a better low light camera than the Moto, which everyone seems to agree. But I'll take SD storage until a FP scanner proves itself to be useful and necessary. I'll also take Motos richer and fuller speakers and call quality, brighter display and whiter whites over the 6Ps more saturated colors and deeper blacks. It seems no phone is perfect. The biggest appeal of Google phones is fast updates. But Marshmallow for Moto X P came out almost immediately after the release of Googles phones. Since Moto changes nothing to the UI (except an additional camera app, meh, and Moto assist apps which are actually useful), future updates should be quick too. Plenty of people are remarking on the "premium feel" of the 6P (can we stop saying that finally. Its starting to sound so cliche as to be moronic) but I personally don't like the look of it with the visor on top and plastic 'door' on the bottom. Oh and the guy who bent the two 6Ps couldn't bend the Moto X Pure (he has a video assaulting that phone too) but I don't know anyone who would apply full force to bending their phone so there's that. But if you want to see the internal build quality, there are plenty of youtube disassembly videos on both phones. I was more impressed with the Moto's internals which also suggested it has a more rigid internal structure including 3 times as many screws holding the unit together (6 vs 20).

19. wonkman

Posts: 7; Member since: Dec 22, 2015

One other thing, many reviews were done when the 6P had Marshmallow and Moto still had Lollipop. Now that they both have 6, which has battery and UI improvements, the battery time has much improved as well as the UI snappiness on the Moto. Its a more level comparison to read reviews after the Marshmallow upgrade.

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