The U.S. government has asked Apple to unlock 15 iPhones over the last four months

The U.S. government has asked Apple to unlock 15 iPhones over the last four months
One reason why Apple has refused to follow the court order demanding that it unlock Syed Farook's Apple iPhone 5c, is the fear that doing it once will give the government ammunition to continue asking it to unlock other iPhones. As it turns out, a new report says that the Justice Department has asked Apple to unlock 15 iPhone units over the last four months.

Apple wrote in a letter to a federal judge in Brooklyn which was unsealed yesterday, that it had been asked to help law enforcement access 13 other iPhones. In its response, the prosecution said it was aware of a 15th request, which was for a case open in Massachusetts. All of these requests took place in October or later. Some of the other iPhones that Apple has been requested to unlock are older models that are not as hard to access as Farook's handset.

Of the 15 requests, Apple has given thumbs down to 12 of them so far. That includes the iPhone 5c used by Farook. He and his wife burst into an office building in San Bernardino on December 2nd after leaving an event in that very same office, and killed 14 people. Law enforcement officials believe that Farook's iPhone could contain a treasure trove of information about others that might have guided the couple through the planning of the attack. More importantly, the phone could contain future targets.

In an open letter to Apple customers written last week, Apple CEO Tim Cook explained that since iOS 8 was launched, the software required to unlock an iPhone does not exist and would have to be built by Apple. But the company is concerned that once this new version of iOS is built, it could end up in the wrong hands threatening the privacy of iPhone users around the world.
 
source: Reuters

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57 Comments

1. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

it doesnt matter. Apple was working with NSA before and now they are acting like a hero. Ppl has a very short term memory, they forget what apple was doing before.

2. Ninetysix

Posts: 2962; Member since: Oct 08, 2012

Pre iOS 8. Sleep tight pupper.

8. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

when ever it was. Why not forget this moron Farok then? it was pre 2016. Lets forget this whole case and stop the investigation. You have given a brilliant idea to bury whole world's problems. Now I can sleep really tight ;)

53. grbrao

Posts: 294; Member since: Nov 23, 2012

Its simply a trick around the sleevs of apple to promot its next coming iphone5se in march...

3. maherk

Posts: 6768; Member since: Feb 10, 2012

You said it best, BEFORE. I think we should respect Apple for fixing that, and now having a strong stance against the government's will to violate their customers privacy.

46. S.R.K.

Posts: 678; Member since: Feb 11, 2016

When Apple was a feebler company, even in the early years of CEO Steve Jobs’ return — the Second Coming before the Jesus Phone — someone in some tech circle of mine would ask: What if Apple was as big and powerful as Microsoft? Wouldn’t we all be better off? I usually heard that question answered “Yes” — that Apple would never be as aggressive or anticompetitive as Microsoft was during its PC supremacy in the late 1980s throughout the 1990s. I always answered “No”. As a corporate culture, Apple seeks to control everything in its supply chain and is secretive about everything else. I saw Apple as being a harsh dictator if ever growing to dominate any part of the tech industry. That’s rapidly proving to be the case — only much more severely than I expected. The company now resorts to competition by litigation, using its patent portfolio to attack competitors in the hot, mobile market. There’s a platform war underway, and the winner could come to dominate smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices the way Microsoft did with the PC. "respect Apple?" BS. They deserve.

4. newuser1

Posts: 276; Member since: Dec 10, 2010

Yep. Apple saying not cooperating with government in the madia, but actually doing it secretly.

11. maherk

Posts: 6768; Member since: Feb 10, 2012

Your source for such a claim? A valid one please

19. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

thats just a proposition and the source of propositions are some ppl's brain.

23. Unordinary unregistered

I feel bad for your spawn

27. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

thats not a problem. Please dont bother yourself to feel bad about other ppl's stuff. Its not your problem. Han, if you are in a same boat and feel bad about your own self then you can feel for others too. I think you are the same, right?

36. Skimshaddy

Posts: 126; Member since: Feb 23, 2016

They been working with them for the last 4 months and we finally just heard this? So they wasn't honest the whole times? Lying Apple bitch lol.

5. janis

Posts: 397; Member since: Mar 10, 2014

i am not living in USA, i am wondering is this some marketing campaign from apple? sounds like complete BS.

18. another1

Posts: 157; Member since: Dec 25, 2015

So basically, you alluded that you are not well versed in the current state of US national security, then proceed to call Apple's stance BS? Dude shut the hell up.

6. newuser1

Posts: 276; Member since: Dec 10, 2010

Is iPhone security really that tough? then what happens when iPhone users got their phones locked out? throw it away ?

9. jellmoo

Posts: 2562; Member since: Oct 31, 2011

Start from scratch? The issue isn't that this bricks the phone, the issue is that the government wants the personal information on it. Too many invalid security entries wipes the data. The phone is still usable though.

10. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

no, it is not. I remember recent history of apple's so called tight security. Ppl tends to forget past very quickly.

20. therealestmc

Posts: 679; Member since: Jul 23, 2012

My guess is they can reset it but they will lose any personal data on it, which the government doesn't not want to happen. Essentially, they want to bypass the reset without losing data.

42. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

bring it to nearest apple store, show identity card and answer some simple question, and they'll factory reset that phone, wipe all data, and restore whatever available from cloud backup (and then restore your own backup at home) or to make your life easier, try these step 1 burn that phone 2 buy android

51. nithyakr

Posts: 161; Member since: Jun 20, 2014

So basically what you are suggesting is to Buy an Android because it is easy to hack even if you forgot your pin pattern or passcode? Or because of that Android is not secure as iOS? Jeez. People are getting dumber by the day. Why would anyone forget their passcode? Use the damn fingerprint reader people (Android or iOS for that matter). If your device doesnt have it, Backup to iCloud whenever you can and if you had to reset your phone, then you can restore it easily.

7. jellmoo

Posts: 2562; Member since: Oct 31, 2011

Apple honestly can't win here, can they? They do the right thing and stand up for privacy rights and they still get flak for this being a PR stunt or a marketing move. I don't care *why* Apple is taking this stand, I'm just glad that somebody is, and I'm prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt so long as they continue to be the good guys in this.

12. maherk

Posts: 6768; Member since: Feb 10, 2012

Exactly my thoughts

14. another1

Posts: 157; Member since: Dec 25, 2015

I don't know why people think Apple is bad for doing what they are doing. It's not that Apple doesn't want to help. But, if Apple complies with the Government, the slippery slope will begin. Other phone manufacturers will follow suit to provide back door access for major crime related info. But that's just the start. If you aren't with Apple here, you basically are saying you don't give a damn about privacy. And if that's the case, feel free to post nudes of your wife or Gf immediately (jk)..

15. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

I couldn't have said it better. Right is right no matter who is doing it right. Even the Devil does good things.

16. another1

Posts: 157; Member since: Dec 25, 2015

"Even the devil does good things" Just had thrown in that Apple jab didn't you?

40. MrElectrifyer

Posts: 3960; Member since: Oct 21, 2014

Why not? Just 'cause apple is being a hero now doesn't automatically make them a saint and erase all their years of hypocrisy (bit.ly/1si5DVX)...

47. S.R.K.

Posts: 678; Member since: Feb 11, 2016

Majority of Americans are supporting FBI and not Apple.

43. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

they can win, if they can "somehow", close this case ASAP, since their current presedent didnt really force them to unlock it.. if they continue to drag it until election season, presidential candidate can do campaign about how they want to fight terorism and stuff by forcing apple to unlock it.. (I'ts not like I even care about that, since I'm not there)

13. ZeneticX

Posts: 63; Member since: Feb 27, 2014

This is all marketing ploy by Apple to increase sales for their 5se and 7 models. Especially 7 since it's going to lose the headphone jack

17. another1

Posts: 157; Member since: Dec 25, 2015

You are truly an idiot if you think this is in any shape or form a marketing ploy.

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