Why Google's secret attempt to settle with the EU Competitive Commission failed

Why Google's secret attempt to settle with the EU Competitive Commission failed
Last week, we told you that Google had been fined the princely sum of $5.04 billion by the EU. The EU Competition Commission found that Google violated antitrust regulations by  requiring that phone manufacturers install certain Google apps on Android phones (like Search and Chrome), pay these manufacturers to limit the installation of Search apps on their phones to Google Search, and ban the release of handsets using unapproved versions of Android. According to a report published today, Google's secret attempt to settle with the EU failed because the company waited too long to offer a settlement plan.

The dispatch from Bloomberg reveals that last August, after being fined a then-record $2.4 billion euros ($2.7 billion USD) in a separate case involving the EU, Google attempted to reach out to the European Union Competition Commission headed by Commissioner Margrethe Vestager. In a letter sent to the Commission, the company outlined some broad ideas to make the antitrust case go away. In the letter, Google said that it would make changes to its contracts with phone manufacturers giving them more options in regard to their use of Android. This would make these pacts less restrictive in line with the EU's thinking. The letter also contained two plans to distribute apps to the manufacturers in new ways.

Google never received a response from the EU about the possibility of settling. According to Commissioner Vestager, Google had sent its letter about a year too late. She said that the company should have responded immediately after it received the initial complaint from the EU. "That didn’t happen in this case and then of course it takes the route that it has now taken. So no surprises," the commissioner said. In addition, the EU Competition Commission felt that the letter was not convincing. 

Google has announced that it will appeal the fine, which amounts to a little more than 10% of Google's annual take from mobile ad sales.

source: Bloomberg

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6 Comments

1. Papa_Ji

Posts: 855; Member since: Jun 27, 2016

Now every country should start fine google.... for it's dirty tricks. We need something new... iOS and Android feels boring. Want to see new OS like YunOS (2nd largest OS in china...google don't want the world to know about it) and TIZEN to be at next level. WE NEED NEW MOBILE OS.

2. gigicoaste

Posts: 457; Member since: Feb 21, 2016

like seriously, who are "we"?? Are there a group of people behind you? There are many OS, that developers are not supporting the platforms, that is something else.

4. AbhiD

Posts: 844; Member since: Apr 06, 2012

This guy is a retard. Only thoughts of Samsung make him go wet. This moron doesn't even know OS's like YunOS are pathetically coded and are possible malware/spamware. According to this idiot every country should extort money from google to fund their budgets because he feels so! This dumba$$ doesn't even know what Israeli security researcher said about his daddy Samsung's Tizen OS - " It may be the worst code I’ve ever seen.Everything you can do wrong there, they do it. You can see that nobody with any understanding of security looked at this code or wrote it. It’s like taking an undergraduate and letting him program your software...You can update a Tizen system with any malicious code you want. " https://www.phonearena.com/news/Samsungs-Tizen-OS-is-a-hackers-dream-security-researcher-exposes-40-unknown-vulnerabilities_id92721

3. RebelwithoutaClue unregistered

I find the title misleading, a secret attempt makes it sound unethical. While you can always file for a settlement in these situations. Nothing secret about it.

5. MartyK

Posts: 1043; Member since: Apr 11, 2012

Now, the truth comes out. It's not about the people of EU; it's all about the money. Google needs to just pull out those markets.

10. tokuzumi

Posts: 1927; Member since: Aug 27, 2009

Somehow, Microsoft survived this same thing back in the 90s. Google will be OK.

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