The Galaxy S10 Lite will have unmatched image stabilization, according to leakster

The Galaxy S10 Lite will have unmatched image stabilization, according to leakster
Alleged renders of the Galaxy Note 10 Lite (left) and the Galaxy S10 Lite (right)

The year has barely started but there’s no time to lose as the first smartphone releases of 2020 are just days away. So far, the quickest on the draw is poised to be Samsung. For the first time, the company is planning to release “lite” versions of its 2019 flagships, the Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy Note 10 and the expected date is January 10.

Tons of information about the two devices has already been revealed through the usual unofficial channels, and now we have the latest scoop. IceUniverse, the prominent leaker, shares a tidbit about the upcoming Galaxy S10 Lite in his typical manner:


The tweet, concise as usual, states that the new phone will have “unprecedented OIS technology on a phone, even better than any current flagship phone.” Now that is a bold statement! It raises several thoughts and questions, but before we delve into those, first we must assume that Galaxy S10 Lite will indeed have some advanced OIS tech. (Update: OnLeaks adds that Samsung calls it Super Steady OIS)

Let’s begin with “on a phone”. This likely means that the technology is nothing we haven’t seen before but it will be the first time we’ll see it shrunk enough to be on a smartphone. GoPro action cameras are notorious for their image stabilization which is essential for their functionality so perhaps Samsung has taken a page from that book when designing its new camera.

Another notable part is “any current smartphone flagship”. This, of course, includes the iPhone 11 Pro. The iPhone’s video capture capability is one of its best features large because of the good image stabilization and if a “lite” Samsung phone can beat that, it would be a big step forward for the South Korean manufacturer.

This raises the question of “why”. It’s obvious why Samsung would want amazing OIS, the question is why would it introduce it with the Galaxy S10 Lite? The next Galaxy S series should be released towards the end of February, not even two months from now. It’s safe to assume they’ll have the same tech, which is obviously a very desirable feature. So having it on a much cheaper phone released a month prior seems illogical.

One potential positive is that if the OIS is really as good as the leaker makes it sound it is, the Galaxy S10 Lite will create hype before the release of the S11 (S20?) models. Considering the price and design differences, perhaps Samsung thinks the two devices target separate market segments and won’t hinder each other’s sales.

If the rumors are true, we won’t have to wait long before we find out what’s what. Hopefully, in 2020 cheaper smartphones continue to receive features until recently reserved for flagships.

FEATURED VIDEO

7 Comments

1. yonith

Posts: 230; Member since: Sep 11, 2012

You repeatedly say IOS instead of OIS. Nice post though.

4. osterrich21

Posts: 190; Member since: Apr 14, 2017

IPhone arena thinking in iPhone.

2. JMartin22

Posts: 2413; Member since: Apr 30, 2013

Edit: wrong article

3. Methlab

Posts: 32; Member since: Apr 19, 2019

This is all just hype.

7. Epicness1o1

Posts: 326; Member since: May 30, 2013

Why they calling it s10 lite, 2 months before S20, wtf hahahaha

8. peschiera

Posts: 65; Member since: Sep 17, 2017

On December 20th PH reported about a leak that "Apple is looking to implement a more advanced image stabilization solution inside the iPhone 12 Pro and Pro Max that’d see the existing optical image stabilization technology replaced by new sensor-shift hardware". I commented: "The usual game: each time the release of a new technology by a competitor is imminent or got known to Apple, Apple leaks such rumors in order to link the technology to themselves". I bet Samsung S10 lite would come with exactly this or similar technology.

9. Cat97

Posts: 2021; Member since: Mar 02, 2017

I suspect it's just a fancy name for a midrange, non-optical IS system using the phone's tilt sensor/accelerometer.

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.
FCC OKs Cingular's purchase of AT&T Wireless