Are Seton Hall's incoming freshmen learning that 2+2=5?

Are Seton Hall's incoming freshmen learning that 2+2=5?
The Seton Hall incoming freshmen group, the Class of 2016, is getting rewarded from their school's partnership with Microsoft and Nokia. As part of what the school calls it's Mobile Computing Initiative, each student is receiving a Nokia Lumia 900. This is nothing new for Seton Hall which in 2008-09 handed students in various programs an Amazon Kindle or a Nokia handset. In 2009-2010, students in selected majors received an Apple iPad or an Android tablet.

While all of the sides to the deal refuse to disclose the terms, it is the first time that an entire class is receiving a mobile gadget. And of course, the school wants all the recipients to download the University's SHU app. The app allows a student to look at his/her schedule, tuition balance, financial aid offers and also shows a map of the campus and surrounding area. It also allows students and advisors to communicate with each other. The one strange thing is that the app is compatible with iOS, BlackBerry and Android, and none of those platforms runs the Nokia Lumia 900 that the freshmen are receiving. Either the new phones will have access to the mobile app as it expands into the Windows Phone marketplace, or else the students are learning that 2+2=5.

source: SetonHallUniversity, PCWorld via Gizmodo


Related phones

Lumia 900
  • Display 4.3 inches 800 x 480 pixels
  • Camera 8 MP (Single camera) 1.3 MP front
  • Hardware Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 APQ8055 0.5GB RAM
  • Storage 16GB,
  • Battery 1830 mAh
  • OS Windows Phone 7.8

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