The "no smartphone" phobia is a growing issue and it has little to do with being unable to make or receive calls

The "no smartphone" phobia is a growing issue and it has little to do with being unable to make or receive calls

Nowadays, we spend insane amounts of time on our smartphones. It's the first thing we reach for in the morning, it's the last thing we touch before going to sleep. Users happily report when they manage to achieve 8 hours of screen on time with their handset, lauding the amazing battery life, but the connotation that this means you were facing down with your nose buried in the small screen for 8 hours that day is often left overlooked.

Smartphone addiction and phone separation anxiety are often being thrown around in discussions about the list of millennial issues. Scientists are doing all sorts of tests and social experiments to try and determine the dangers of getting too attached to our little box, and what to do to prevent that. In a recent study, researchers from the City University of Hong Kong have tried to take a deeper look into the “nomophobia” (the anxiety one feels when one is separated from their smartphone) issue. Previously, it was believed that the main reason for the stress reaction is that we start fearing that we might miss a very important call. However, now, researchers are arguing there's something else at play that has absolutely nothing to do with making or receiving actual calls.

The "no smartphone" phobia is a growing issue and it has little to do with being unable to make or receive calls
Over the past few years, smartphones have become an integral part of our lives and, like it or not, a central tool with which we project our personality into the world. We take pictures of the cool things in our lives and immediately share them on Facebook; we get rated by likes, hearts, retweets, and comments; we follow our personal heroes and may even interact with them straight from the phone. Handsets have become, the researchers say, a sort of “scrapbooks of our lives”.

Studies have shown that when we post a life event over social media, the act of capturing it becomes an actual part of the overall experience, and may even change the way we remember the story. For many users, it has become second nature to reach for the phone whenever anything interesting happens to them. Thus, the device feels like an extension of one's self, storing all of our memories and allowing us to instantly share our perspective of the human experience with others.

Dr Ki Joon Kim of the City University of Hong Kong said he fears that users' attachment to their handsets will only grow in the future, and hopes that people can be more conscious of their usage — make great use of the “smart” features of a smartphone, but don't become entangled with their endless customization and personalization features.

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14 Comments

1. Nine1Sickness

Posts: 896; Member since: Jan 30, 2011

Another Samsung article?! Samsungarena!!!

2. TeriusRose

Posts: 108; Member since: May 12, 2017

.... what?

3. TeriusRose

Posts: 108; Member since: May 12, 2017

Any insight as to why this doesn't fall under the general category of addiction?

12. L0n3n1nja

Posts: 1521; Member since: Jul 12, 2016

I think it's an internet/social media addiction and not a phone addiction.

5. sissy246

Posts: 7002; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

What the hell are you talking about troll.

9. GoGoGalaxyNexus

Posts: 80; Member since: Nov 01, 2013

Ha ha, just because Iphones cannot achieve 8 hours of battery life does not mean the article is about Samsung phones, troll

4. Jacksie66 unregistered

When I sold my v20 and was waiting a week for my xz premium I just used a boring old Sony Ericsson I had lying around. It was actually great. No Facebook or social media. No annoyances. Just like the old days. I'm half thinking of going back to a dumb phone just for the peace and quiet.

6. Klinton

Posts: 1408; Member since: Oct 24, 2016

This has nothing to do with some 'smartphones'. This is about internet and multi media. All the internet-multimedia devices are basically SAME device. No matter that the marketing call them with different names. They do same job and only the size is different. This that we call 'smartphone' is most pocketable, and those what we call tablets or laptops have bigger screen. Ppl that stay mostly in one room will prefer larger screens, those who are on the move will use more 'smatphones' .

7. PhoneCritic

Posts: 1345; Member since: Oct 05, 2011

it is just as I observed and fear. People tend to see their smartphone as a projection of themselves and even some sort of tribalism. If I am a Android user then I either feel superior to an iOS user and vise Versa. Then there is another layer if I am a Samsung user than I Feel superior to a HTC user etc.. IF I am a Mobile user in the USA I am superior to a user in Europe or Africa etc.. This is becoming really absurd and dangerous we need to all put down our mobile device for a moment and take time to enjoy what is presently in front of us. Our families and friends. Social media can wait for one day.

8. Jacksie66 unregistered

Spot on. You especially see it on this site with the constant bickering and arguments. People fighting over brands that don't give a toss about you.

10. mrmessma

Posts: 271; Member since: Mar 28, 2012

I agree with most of your points, but I think a majority of people don't feel that strongly about OSs. When I was younger, I was adamantly Android and I still prefer it, but if some prefer iOS, then that's just fine, not a big deal. I still feel like it's not the best value, but many people don't spend hours a week pouring over tech stuff so they likely don't know better. It comes down to "let people enjoy things".

11. PhoneCritic

Posts: 1345; Member since: Oct 05, 2011

I just think that some time people take these mobile devices too seriously and almost to the point that they will give their life for them ( some sell body part like Kidneys for them) which is so scary at times. As I have said before in other post. Google, Apple Samsung, LG, etc.. are reaping in the benefits in dollars while we ( the users ) get nothing so why the name calling and berating others for getting what they like. I have no issues with people giving opinions but at least give some facts to support why you like or don't like something and above all don't be hypocritical. If a manufacture produces something and it pushes tech forward don't call it a useless gimmick and then when another manufacture implements it too say "wow!!! Innovation now this is done right" I will gladly say when Apple introduced the dual telescopic lens on the iPhone model that was really pushing tech forward and innovating on a mobile level and not a gimmick. Now that Samsung will also be implementing it on the Note 8 I am happy about that. So now that the iPhone is getting oled display and wireless charging etc.. Apple fans should also give credit where credit is due not say well we did it right or now its not a gimmick. that is being unfair and hypocritical. it reeks of tribalism.

13. L0n3n1nja

Posts: 1521; Member since: Jul 12, 2016

If your phone is the last thing you touch before going to bed I hope you're single....cause you shouldn't be cuddling a phone at night while ignoring your SO.

14. Anchor

Posts: 160; Member since: Jun 16, 2017

All this is happening because Mankind has become plain stupid. Everybody wants to be a celebrity, they wanna have the most likes on fb, most re-tweets, most views and so on. Social Media addiction is what's really the problem, and some even more stupid people think that your phone brand makes you richer or more knowledgeable than the other. I just think people ran out of ideas for discrimination/show of class/racism or whatever that makes you feel like you're better or brighter than your fellow. Humanity has hit a new low and the social media is the queen bee.

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