New data shows Chromebooks are struggling, Windows RT is doing better

New data shows Chromebooks are struggling, Windows RT is doing better
Despite their low cost, “instant-on” nature and always-connected style, Chromebooks account for such a small amount of web traffic that it does not even warrant an asterisk on NetMarketShare’s report.

Web traffic from Chromebooks accounted for two-one-hundredths of one-percent (0.02% or 0.0002). Since its launch in 2011, the Chromebook has been marching to its own tune but hard sales figures have not been making much news.

OEMs that have been manufacturing Chromebooks have not been bragging about their sales performance either. It has been reported that Acer has only sold about 5,000 Chromebooks since last summer. That has not stopped Google however, in fact, Google doubled-down with the recent introduction of the high-definition touch screen Chromebook Pixel. Samsung’s Chromebook was also a hot item on Amazon this past holiday season.

By comparison, Windows RT statistics are not any better, however, Windows RT was able to achieve parity in only a few months. Its popularity may grow now that manufacturers are cutting prices on Windows RT devices.

What does this really mean to Chromebooks and Chrome OS? Nothing. Google is clearly invested in this horse for the long haul. That is a good thing, because over 90% of the world is in a Windows environment and a lot of people are not on board with the whole cloud computing scheme.

Chrome is a solid OS, it came out of the Pwnium 3 conference unhacked which is a major accomplishment. Microsoft is equally all-in with Windows RT and its path also certainly includes a heavy dose of cloud computing in the future as well. So while Chrome is off to a slower-than-molasses-in-winter-time start, Google’s vision is long and its pockets are deep.

source: ZDNet

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16 Comments

1. xperiaDROID

Posts: 5629; Member since: Mar 08, 2013

Chromebook is ok, but I've already bought a Windows 8 laptop, so sorry Google! :)

3. biophone

Posts: 1994; Member since: Jun 15, 2011

It's a good secondary computer. You can use your windows 8 laptop on your chromebook if you want something lighter and more portable that isn't burdened by a fan.

4. naveenstuns

Posts: 184; Member since: Feb 19, 2012

secondary computer ?????? wtf.... then what is the use of smartphones????

6. protozeloz

Posts: 5396; Member since: Sep 16, 2010

Portable devices? Social hub? Camera? I can think of a million use for a smartphone that's not related with the average computer

5. protozeloz

Posts: 5396; Member since: Sep 16, 2010

I have a tablet for my secondary computing device so for me is a windows laptop or a gaming desktop... At least until we see more progress with apps, and I think this should be enough of a reason to fuse chrome OS and android into a single powerful tool, the power of the web plus native applications... Would make a chrome book totally worth it

12. EXkurogane

Posts: 863; Member since: Mar 07, 2013

Chromebook is a waste of money itself, whether it can be a secondary or tertiary computer (I have 3 laptops), windows is still the one to go because of higher productivity potential. Just pay a bit more but you can do a lot more on windows 8 than chrome OS. RT? If the price is similar or lower than chromebook i'd buy one, because for $500 i'd rather buy something like Acer W510 which runs full windows 8 over Surface RT.

14. xperiaDROID

Posts: 5629; Member since: Mar 08, 2013

Secondary computer??? Nuh-uh, I'm all ok with Windows 8! :)

9. anywherehome

Posts: 971; Member since: Dec 13, 2011

Chromebook had been doomed before the launch, should have asked me :) .....W8 is just a habit slowly dumping

2. shikroi

Posts: 187; Member since: Sep 24, 2012

I have zero interest in either platforms. They are both useless imo.

7. cezarepc

Posts: 718; Member since: Nov 23, 2012

Same here. If you want something free just get Ubuntu (or any Linux-based OS). Started using Ubuntu when I sort of got MS OS damaged. I couldn't afford a new CD then, so I decided to try out Ubuntu temporarily but truth is I haven't looked back since.

8. UrbanPhantom

Posts: 949; Member since: Oct 30, 2012

"Chrome is a solid OS, it came out of the Pwnium 3 conference unhacked which is a major accomplishment." Of course it came out unhacked - there's nothing to hack! Chromebooks are basically dumb mobile terminals that can't do anything other than turn on and connect to the internet. How can you call Chrome a solid OS when it does nothing else? My motherboard bios can access a web browzer without booting up the hard-drive - so, does that make it a solid OS too? Chromebooks are nothing more than a screen, keyboard & trackpad, and wi-fi receiver and transmitter. It may be solid, but it's still just an empty box...

13. gaurang

Posts: 94; Member since: Nov 16, 2012

you spoke my feeling about the chrbooks,,,

10. Andrewtst

Posts: 697; Member since: Jan 25, 2009

Obvious, I know Chromebook Pixel look damn sexy, but the OS itself was too blank and boring and nothing much can do...

11. lubba

Posts: 1313; Member since: Jan 17, 2011

Funny how tech sites glorify this chromebooks. But reality shows the truth.

15. dhmcop

Posts: 11; Member since: Dec 12, 2012

I love my little $200 Acer chrome book. I can easily hook up to my HDTVs and it is very portable throughout the house. I'm getting 41.46 Mbps download which is far better than my iPad or my G7. Yes there were limitations but this is just the start of what chrome OS will be able to do.

16. downphoenix

Posts: 3165; Member since: Jun 19, 2010

I've actually considered getting a chromebook because they are pretty neat, but Google hasnt really "sold" us on the chromebook yet. There is really little incentive to get a chromebook vs a similarly priced android tablet. Maybe if Google can incentiveize it should be good to go.

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