Take this survey from Motorola to see if you own your phone, or if it owns you



Motorola has produced a survey for smartphone users to take. Made up of simple questions like "which would be easier to stay away from for one week, your family or your phone?," the survey helps decide where you stand in what the manufacturer calls the "phone-life balance." There are five potential categories ranging from the phonosapian, who uses his phone just for the basics, to the phonatic. The latter is on his phone 24-hours a day, from the time he gets up in the morning to right before he falls asleep at night. In between there are three other levels, mindfully mobile, phone-prone and phonophile.

To build a better relationship with your phone, Motorola suggests installing the Space app on your iOS or Android handset. Based on research from top universities, Space is a personalized digital behavior change program that is designed to end your phone addiction. After taking a quiz, you'll set some goals. Tools like a notification blocker and a screen dimmer start you on your path toward a life where your phone isn't as important to you. Currently, 80,000 monthly active users are employing the Space app.

If you really have become addicted to your smartphone, the Space app might not be a bad thing to install on your handset. Simply click on the appropriate link: (iOS|Android).

To take Motorola's quiz to see where you stand with your phone-life balance, tap on the sourcelink below. And if you want to see real life people using their smartphone in the middle of their vacation, tap the video at the top of this story.

source: Motorola

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