Google drops more hints on which Nexus devices will be getting Android N and O: here's a cheatsheet

Google drops more hints on which Nexus devices will be getting Android N and O: here's a cheatsheet
One of the biggest strengths of Google's Nexus lineup of devices is the fact that they are usually the first ones to receive a new Android update and are also the ones with the lengthiest software support. There's hardly anything not to like about this, except the fact that the support is not indefinite.

Google clearly states that its Nexus devices will receive any new Android versions two years after the device has hit the Play Store, while security patches and hotfixes will be sent to compatible devices up to three years after the specific Nexus phone was last available on the Play Store.

While that's a pretty сlear statement, it's still rather hard to put things in perspective, but thankfully, Google recently introduced a handy sheet with some of it latest Nexus devices and the end-date by which they will no longer receive any new Android version updates.

DeviceNo guaranteed Android version updates after
Nexus 5XSeptember 2017
Nexus 6PSeptember 2017
Nexus 9October 2016
Nexus 6 October 2016
Nexus 5 October 2015
Nexus 7 (2013)July 2015
Nexus 10November 2014

The Nexus 6P and 5X, being the latest additions to the stock Android gang, will get both Android N and most likely next year's Android O (Oreo, anyone?). Moreover, the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 will not get any updates after October 2016 - this means that we are not entirely sure whether Android N will be released for these. If past Android releases have taught us something, it's that Google releases Android in late October or early November, which means that the Nexus 6 and 9 could just hit the jackpot.

Sadly, owners of older Nexus phones and tablets will have to resort to non-official methods to flash any upcoming Android flavors on their devices, but having the large community in mind, that wouldn't be a big issue.

source: Google via Reddit

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93 Comments

1. Feanor

Posts: 1362; Member since: Jun 20, 2012

Not all that impressive for stock Android devices. Xperia Z2 was released more than 2 years ago and it has moved up also two major Android versions, from Kit Kat to Lollipop and from Lollipop to Marshmallow. And it's not a Nexus phone. So, it's true that Nexus phones will get the updates sooner, but not true that they are supported longer.

3. sergeroyal

Posts: 1; Member since: Jun 21, 2016

What are you talking about??? Nexus 5 was released 3 years ago and was officially updated to MM long before Xperia Z2. Wonder how many phones last more than 3 years nowadays anyway.

5. Scott93274

Posts: 6033; Member since: Aug 06, 2013

The Nexus 5 was released on Oct. 31, 2013, and Marshmallow came out on October 22, 2015 so it was within the support window, so naturally it has Marshmallow.

25. NexusPhan

Posts: 632; Member since: Jul 11, 2013

Nexus 5 was released with 4.4 It currently is on it's 7th release of 6.0.1 where the latest update was this month. It's still being fully support long after the promised 24 months.

30. Scott93274

Posts: 6033; Member since: Aug 06, 2013

And that's cool that it's continuing to receive updates, by my statement was to emphasis that it's not all that surprising that the Nexus 5 got Marshmallow because the new OS was released within the support window for a Nexus device. Sergeroyal made it sound impressive that it got the update because the phone was released "3 years ago" (not quite).

58. vincelongman

Posts: 5688; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

The Nexus 7 (2013) got Marshmallow, despite its guaranteed support window ending July 2015, several months before Marshmallow So there's still a decent chance the Nexus 5 will get N

26. Schmao

Posts: 365; Member since: Jul 05, 2009

My 4 year old galaxy note 2 is still chugging along :)

29. Mxyzptlk unregistered

slowly of course

44. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

i doubt it! -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHk6gCFAGxs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSICzbenUVo Though both are using custom roms, as you can see they are feature packed and still the phone is fast. Stop being a hater because a 3 year old iPhone can't handle it. Quadcore still are more powerful than dualcore.

48. Mxyzptlk unregistered

"Though both are using custom roms," That pretty much invalidates your entire argument.

54. aegislash

Posts: 1492; Member since: Jan 27, 2015

At least Android users have the option of using custom roms if their devices become void of updates.

68. Mxyzptlk unregistered

That's an excuse and custom ROMs aren't as good as the stock software.

81. yoghibawono

Posts: 240; Member since: May 04, 2016

who says? clearly you have no idea of android ecosystem ;)

60. IT-Engineer

Posts: 540; Member since: Feb 26, 2015

For once your comment makes common sense

38. Mrmark

Posts: 391; Member since: Jan 26, 2013

I got a oneplus one for sale lol

31. Leo_MC

Posts: 7432; Member since: Dec 02, 2011

One of my phones is older than that (well, it's almost 3 years old :)), runs the latest version of OS (I have it run the latest beta) and it should be fully supported until 2018 (a total of 5 years), but it's not Android based. I'm happy to see Android devices are getting all the support they deserve, this way the products mature and the manufacturer will be forced to innovate and not release the same product with only marginal hardware upgrades (a better CPU, faster ram, higher ppi and such); maybe this way they will compel me to change my 3 years old device faster than I plan to.

4. ashrafalhujaili

Posts: 73; Member since: Oct 03, 2014

xperia z2 was released sep 2014 , so it's not more than 2 years nexus 5 was released nov 2013 , and both on MM so yes nexus devices supported longer not to mention that nexus 5 got it before xperia z2 by almost 6 months !!

8. Feanor

Posts: 1362; Member since: Jun 20, 2012

You're both wrong. The Z2 was released in April 2014, so over two years ago. It's support has (probably, no official Sony news, just my speculation) stopped exactly two years after and with its Marshmallow update. According to the document displayed by this article, the support for the Nexus 5 has ended already last October, also exactly two years after it was released. So, it's pretty much the same as the Z2, a non Nexus phone. Read carefully what I write and do the maths also a bit more carefully.

21. Commentator

Posts: 3723; Member since: Aug 16, 2011

Kind of cheating to say "two year support" since Marshmallow was close to half-a-year old in April. Suppose they put Marshmallow on it in 2024. They would have supported it for ten years, but would it really matter? To be fair, it's not like they could install a NEWER version of Android than M.

10. anglosaxonengland

Posts: 64; Member since: Sep 11, 2013

The point isn't that. For a Nexus device with software coming from Google, you'd expect Apple-level software support else it's completely pointless getting a Nexus in the first place.

24. dazed1

Posts: 796; Member since: Jul 28, 2015

Your logic is completely pointless.

42. marorun

Posts: 5029; Member since: Mar 30, 2015

I tend to agree nexus device should be supported 3 to 4 years not 2 years. Quite sad for my nexus 7 :(

6. sgodsell

Posts: 7327; Member since: Mar 16, 2013

What kills me is even though Google might not continue with the offical ROM updates. Users can still get ROM updates from other sources. Or roll and compile it them selves, which is no light undertaking. However there is lots of life left. Especially when I see devices like the Nexus S (2010) have the latest Android 6.

34. arenanew

Posts: 286; Member since: Dec 30, 2013

rip google very soon

7. .KRATOS.

Posts: 442; Member since: Mar 15, 2013

That's where iphone is king

9. Scott93274

Posts: 6033; Member since: Aug 06, 2013

So they're king in an area that's only relevant if you keep your phone for more than three years? I can't speak for everyone here but I typically upgrade every two years to a new device... Though I think my Nexus 6P might convince me to go an additional year before I consider upgrading it.

14. der_damo

Posts: 213; Member since: Sep 16, 2014

You must be new to device-loyality. There are people walking around with their iPhone 4/4S and they're pretty happy with it. So your device-loyality means nothing compared to the masses.

20. Scott93274

Posts: 6033; Member since: Aug 06, 2013

I know a few people that still have odd school iPhones, but they're also unaware of update schedules or anything of the sort, and I cannot particularly see them caring all that much about not getting the latest and greatest phone/OS. I also know several people that're the same way with Android devices, so I guess it just goes to show that those who really care about getting the latest OS, and not typically those who hold onto a phone for more that 3 years.

63. AlikMalix unregistered

Scott, you're kid of correct on this. Yes, I see loads of iPhone 4 and 4s (and I can bet money that I'll see another 3GS before the year is over - saw a proud owner of a white one in February), but people that carry 4-5 year old devices don't care about latest updates. For me, I was exctatic to still see a security update 6.x.x for my old 3GS months after I bought iPhone 5s with iOS 7 already out for a few months. (That puts 5 year support for the 3GS model). But after carrying 3GS for 4.5 years as primary and only device, I'm now upgrading every two years - so when you hear Apple supporting old 4-5 year old devices the only benefit to me is bragging rights on PA. Lol.

65. Scott93274

Posts: 6033; Member since: Aug 06, 2013

And bragging rights are awesome. I'm not criticizing Apple one bit about their efforts to keep dated hardware relevant, but it's something I cannot personally appreciate, even if I were an avid iOS user simply because I would never be in a situation where it would be relevant to me because I upgrade phones too frequently, as do a majority of the people on this site so it's somewhat of a irrelevant argument, because it's not going to change anyone else's mind around here one way or the other.

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