FBI to assist Arkansas authorities unlock an Apple iPad and iPod in double murder case

FBI to assist Arkansas authorities unlock an Apple iPad and iPod in double murder case
No sooner did the FBI successfully find a way to unlock Syed Farook's Apple iPhone 5c without help from the company, than the law enforcement agency has started lending its new found expertise to other Police Departments. For example, the FBI has just approved a request from the Conway PD in Arkansas to use its computing acumen to unlock an Apple iPhone and Apple iPod that are important in a murder case involving two teenagers.

It isn't clear whether the FBI plans on using the same technique it employed to unlock the infamous iPhone 5c used by Fayed. Originally, the government was stymied by Apple's inability to open the phone because of changes made with iOS 8. A court order was issued to try to compel Apple to unlock the phone, but the company resisted because opening it would require a new version of iOS that was dubbed "Govt.OS." What kept Apple CEO Tim Cook up at night was the fear that the code for such an OS would end up in the wrong hands, potentially threatening the security of content kept on every iPhone on the planet.

Now, Apple is demanding that the FBI reveal to it the method it used to open the phone so that it can close the opening with a software update. Good luck having the FBI agree to that. But we digress.

In the new case in Arkansas, a judge put the trial of 18-year-old Hunter Drexler on hold so that prosecutors could request help from the FBI in opening the defendant's iPhone and iPod. Prosecutors say that those two devices could contain evidence related to the murders last July of Robert and Patricia Cogdell. The pair were raising the second defendant, 15-year old Justin Staton, as their grandson.

Now that the FBI has agreed to help, the trial should resume shortly.


source: CNET

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23 Comments

1. Jango

Posts: 372; Member since: Oct 24, 2014

Apple really need to sort out security on iOS.

7. GreenMan

Posts: 2694; Member since: Nov 09, 2015

It seems like Apple has secretly given FBI a backdoor to the iOS... iPhans, you're being watched by gMen! You've been warned... Better get a Windows Phone or a Nokia 3310! Or perhaps a good old Blackberry Bold?

34. Xperia14

Posts: 1205; Member since: Sep 01, 2015

So what, as long as you're no terrorist or doesn't murder anyone, the FBI doesn't give a f**k about you.

14. Emzie

Posts: 22; Member since: Mar 28, 2016

Hahaha FBI splashing backdoors around TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

4. bugsbunny00

Posts: 2260; Member since: Jun 07, 2013

FBI is the "GO TO" for unlocking.hehe

8. darkkjedii

Posts: 30836; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

This is fast becoming the new method of investigating.

10. Shocky unregistered

Apple forced them down this route, was inevitable really. Were Apple really so deluded that they thought they couldn't be unlocked? I guess that's what happens when you drink too much of the kool-aid.

33. Emzie

Posts: 22; Member since: Mar 28, 2016

Got any Apple Sh@*t to unlock just call the FBI

11. newbey123

Posts: 699; Member since: Mar 19, 2012

Apple can suck it! It's fine that they didn't want to help the FBI, but the FBI in no way shape or form, tell Apple how they are unlocking the phones. It's call karma. Deal with Apple, figure it our yourselves, the FBI did!

15. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Now all of a sudden everyone wants to invade the privacy simply because a person was arrested. Just because a person committed a crime, doesn't mean he has evidence on his tablet or phone. This is what Apple was worried about and now it begins. Glad I don't have an iPhone, and my device is encrypted. The FBI can drop dead.

20. Shocky unregistered

Right, Apple should have helped them out in the first instance. Protecting the data on a terrorists or murders phone is not the right thing to do, in these instances Apple should have offered to unlock the devices. Apple refused and now the FBI can access all iPhone's, that worked out really well for Apple and privacy. Do you really think the FBI wouldn't be able to to do the same with an Android device? You must be as deluded as Apple.

29. marorun

Posts: 5029; Member since: Mar 30, 2015

Yeah do it in house with your own tool so you can control what happening. Now they can open any iphone thats they physically have its not as worst as them been able to access any iphone wirelessly and push update using apple signature and custom OS but still its not very good. To respond to willard12 an android phone thats is encrypted can be broken too but its not google thats has the key so its be quite hard as well but not impossible.

22. willard12 unregistered

"Glad I don't have an iPhone, and my device is encrypted." If you are clueless about this, just think of all the other things you are clueless about. http://www.androidauthority.com/google-fbi-pressure-war-on-encryption-683079/

16. Wiencon

Posts: 2278; Member since: Aug 06, 2014

"Just this one phone"

23. xondk

Posts: 1904; Member since: Mar 25, 2014

Yup, pretty much proves what we all knew would happen if Apple had given, and it happens anyway when they find a hole, from what various other sites say it is quite similar to the previous methods of breaking into the phones. Like how for iOS 8 you could get a little box that did the whole unlocking for you.

24. jas0n

Posts: 54; Member since: Mar 01, 2016

thats when they were asking.

17. zeppo

Posts: 200; Member since: Jul 21, 2015

hahahaa !!! From now on, All bad guys will switch to Blackphone 2 which is based on Android for more security.

19. Wiencon

Posts: 2278; Member since: Aug 06, 2014

You mean the phone that got rooted within one week?

31. marorun

Posts: 5029; Member since: Mar 30, 2015

Yeah you can root it but cannot access the business side of the data its protected by a special signature embeded on a chip just like on newer iphone. If you try to access the business side of the blackphone 2 you will have all heavily encrypted files thats you cannot use. Its also delete everything by using a secure deletion when you try too many time to enter the password basically its write random 1 and 0 on all the memory of the phone after thats its game over to get the info again ( even iphone dont do thats last part only blackberry do it ) So yeah he mean Blackphone 2 wich is almost impossible to hack ( its much more secure than any other phone no matter what OS on the market ) Root it all you want its still fully encrypted!

21. jas0n

Posts: 54; Member since: Mar 01, 2016

so now everyone that took apples side claiming this would be a death sentence for privacy now has to deal with 1.) the FBI now having the very thing you didnt want them to, and 2.) Apple having no idea how it was done and therefore no way to patch it. Bravo. Oh yeah, and now there is a third party out there with no responsibility to either the public (in the FBIs case) or consumers (in Apple's case) to keep that method a secret.

25. palmguy

Posts: 965; Member since: Mar 22, 2011

Crime done. Laptop from possible criminal acquired. Authorities hack laptop. Why is this different? Because it's Apple?

32. insanity99

Posts: 104; Member since: Feb 28, 2015

I agree with you.

37. tokuzumi

Posts: 1827; Member since: Aug 27, 2009

This will work for a little while, and will no longer work in future OS updates. It's the big cat and mouse game.

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